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Introduction to Thermodynamics. So what kind of intuition do we have about heat and temperature and energy? Discuss the DCI. Introduction to Thermodynamics. Introduction to Thermodynamics.

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Introduction to Thermodynamics


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    1. Introduction to Thermodynamics So what kind of intuition do we have about heat and temperature and energy? Discuss the DCI.

    2. Introduction to Thermodynamics

    3. Introduction to Thermodynamics Same amount of heat to both beakers, but different mass. ∆T = 30˚ for beaker on the left, so ∆T is half or 15˚. Mass  1/∆T

    4. Introduction to Thermodynamics

    5. Introduction to Thermodynamics Both beakers contain the same amount of water. Twice the heat to one. ∆T is 10˚ for smaller amount of heat, than ∆T = 20˚ for larger amount. Q(heat)  ∆T

    6. Introduction to Thermodynamics

    7. Introduction to Thermodynamics Twice the heat is added to one beaker to reach the same final temperature (∆T). So the beaker must have twice the mass. Q(heat)  Mass

    8. Introduction to Thermodynamics So we have established the following relationships; Mass  1/∆T q(heat)  ∆T q(heat)  mass So q(heat)  mass · ∆T Heat is directly proportional to the mass times the change in temperature.

    9. Introduction to Thermodynamics

    10. Introduction to Thermodynamics

    11. Introduction to Thermodynamics qhot water + qcold water = 0 qhot water = –qcold water masshot water · ∆Thot water = –masscold water · ∆Tcold water 50. g· ∆Thot water = –50. g· ∆Tcold water 50. g· (Tfinal – 80.0˚) = –50. g· (Tfinal – 20.0˚) 2Tfinal = 100˚ Tfinal = 50˚

    12. Introduction to Thermodynamics

    13. Introduction to Thermodynamics

    14. Introduction to Thermodynamics qhot water = –qcold water masshot water · ∆Thot water = –masscold water · ∆Tcold water 50. g· ∆Thot water = –100. g· ∆Tcold water 50. g· (Tfinal – 80.0˚) = –100. g· (Tfinal – 20.0˚) (Tfinal – 80.0˚) = –2· (Tfinal – 20.0˚) 3Tfinal = 120˚ Tfinal = 40˚

    15. Introduction to Thermodynamics

    16. Introduction to Thermodynamics TWO DIFFERENT SUBSTANCES! Experimentally the final temperature is determined to be close to 60˚.

    17. Introduction to Thermodynamics q(heat)  mass · ∆T How do we make this an equality? We must introduce a constant….in this case the constant is called the specific heat, SH, q(heat) = mass · SH · ∆T Specific heat is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of a substance 1 ˚C.

    18. Introduction to Thermodynamics Specific Heats of Substances