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  1. Using Literacy Data Tulsa Public Schools

  2. DIBELs Subtests • Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF) • Word Use Fluency (WUF) • Oral Reading Fluency (ORF) • Retell Fluency (RTF) • Phoneme Segmentation Fluency (PSF) • Initial Sound Fluency (ISF) • Letter Naming Fluency (LNF)

  3. DIBELs Data • Principals: • Completion Reports • Compare Report • Teachers: • Small group advisor • Send Home reports

  4. Completion Report

  5. Comparing Measures Report

  6. Small groups

  7. Small group activities

  8. Item level advisor

  9. Item-level advisor

  10. DIBELS are Indicators • DIBELS is a toothpick • DIBELS are not designed to provide an exhaustive assessment • DIBELS provides an efficient indicator of essential literacy skills acquisition like a toothpick provides an efficient way to tell if the cake is baked. • If the toothpick has dough on it, what should we do?

  11. Bake the Whole Cake, Don’t Just Cook One Place! • Using a torch to cook only the place we checked with the toothpick would not produce a very satisfying cake!

  12. Alphabetic Principle:Torching the cake Artificial ways to raise the NWF score without actually teaching the skill are like torching the cake – they don’t lead to better reading outcomes. • Memorizing and practicing the nonsense words on the next DIBELS assessment. Knowing tob dos et tuj kej does not help children learn to read better. • Telling children not to recode (read the words as a word) but instead just to say the letter sounds as fast as they can. (Recoding is the point of NWF) • Giving extra time or assistance

  13. Accuracy and Fluency with Connected Text:Torching the cake Artificial ways to raise the ORF score without actually teaching the skill are like torching the cake – they don’t lead to better reading outcomes. • Practicing the next DIBELS probe so they can read it fast does not help children learn to read better. • Encouraging children to read only the words they know: The and a an …. • Telling children to read as fast as they can. • Sending the passage home to practice. • Start reading the passage at the third sentence. • Giving extra time or assistance.

  14. Instructional Progression for Decoding

  15. Progress Monitoring • Weekly or biweekly assessments for those students who scored below benchmark and are receiving an intervention • Progress monitoring provides data regarding the intervention and allows for immediate changes in instruction, if necessary. • What to do when a students flat lines red • Starting at a lower level, administer subtests to identify deficiencies • Plan instruction to fill in gaps • Progress monitor that subtest to measure growth

  16. Instructional Progression for Decoding

  17. Lexile Data

  18. What is the Lexile Framework? • An educational tool that links text and readers under a common metric known as Lexiles. • Allows educators to forecast the level of comprehension a reader is expected to experience with a particular text • Most commonly used reading measure • Over 19 million students receive Lexile scores through commercial and state assessments • Over 100,000 books and tens of millions of article have Lexile measures

  19. Lexile Measure • A Lexile is a standard score developed by MetaMetrics • Matches a student’s reading ability with difficulty of text material • Interpreted as the level of book that a student can read with 75% comprehension • 75% comprehension is the level identified by experts as offering the reader a certain amount of comfort and yet still offering a challenge Reading Ability Text Complexity

  20. The Lexile Scale • Lexiles typically range from 200 for beginning readers to 1700 for advanced readers • Lexile text below 200L represents beginning-reading material, and a student’s Lexile score may have a number in the 100s or the code of BR. BR is a code that stands for Beginning Reading. • Applies to both reader ability and text difficulty • When reader and text measures are the same, the student is expected to read with 75% comprehension Can be used to track reading growth over time

  21. SRI (Lexile) Identifies • Identify struggling readers. • Apply as a universal screener and progress monitoring tool. • Monitor progress toward AYP goals. • Monitor effectiveness of instruction. • Establish obtainable and realistic growth goals for students. • Indicate expected performances on state tests.

  22. How to Use Lexiles • It is recommended that readers choose texts within their Lexile range. • A Lexile range is 50L above and 100L below a student’s reported Lexile measure. • Practice with a variety of texts. • Use Lexiles to set goals.

  23. Using Lexiles in the Classroom • Teachers can use Lexiles to help them: • Develop individualized or classroom reading lists tailored to provide appropriately challenging reading. • Enhance thematic teaching by building a bank of titles at varying levels that support the theme, but also allows all students to participate successfully in the theme with material at their own reading level. • Sequence materials, for example by increasing the difficulty of read-aloud books throughout the year. • Source: http://www.lexile.com/m/uploads/downloadablepdfs/Lexiles-in-the-Classroom.pdf

  24. Using Lexiles in the Classroom Teachers can use Lexiles to help them: • Develop a reading folder that goes home with students and comes back for weekly review. • Folder might contain: • a reading list of books within the student’s Lexile range • reports of recent assessments • a form for parents to record reading that occurs at home. • Vary reading difficulty of material to the situation: • Choose texts lower in the student’s Lexile range when factors make the reading situation more challenging, threatening or unfamiliar. • Select texts at or above the student’s range to stimulate growth when a topic is of extreme interest to a student, or when you will be giving additional support such as background teaching or discussion. • Source: http://www.lexile.com/m/uploads/downloadablepdfs/Lexiles-in-the-Classroom.pdf

  25. the Find A Book Toolhttp://lexile.com/fab/

  26. What if a book or document isn’t in the Lexile database? • Use the Lexile Analyzer – it’s free, but you must register. • Create a text document (file extension is .txt) with multiple 175-word slices from the book or document. • Submit via the Lexile Analyzer. http://lexile.com/analyzer/

  27. More Instructional Uses of Lexiles Teachers can use Lexiles to: • Set measurable goals for instruction and special intervention programs • Monitor progress of various reading programs • Make parents “partners to the classroom” by giving them a tool for selecting appropriate reading material for their children (e.g., Summer Reading Lists, visiting library, etc.) • Help students set goals for themselves and use annual OCCT results to see if they have progressed towards their goals. • Source: http://www.lexile.com/m/uploads/downloadablepdfs/Lexiles-in-the-Classroom.pdf

  28. More Instructional Uses of Lexiles Lexiles can help teachers: • Adjust materials to the purpose of reading. • For increased fluency and automaticity, teacher selects text that measures well below reader ability. • As a strategy for teaching students how to attack “hard” text, the teacher selects text that measures above reader ability. • Source: http://www.lexile.com/m/uploads/downloadablepdfs/Lexiles-in-the-Classroom.pdf

  29. Using Lexiles in Media Centers and Public Libraries Media specialists and librarians can assist classroom instruction by • Helping to develop individualized or classroom reading lists tailored to provide appropriately challenging reading. • Guiding teachers in selecting a bank of titles at varying levels that support an instructional thematic unit. This allows all students to participate successfully in the theme with material at their own reading level. • Locating and sequencing materials for classroom use. For example, increasing the difficulty of read-aloud books throughout the year. • Source: https://d1jt5u2s0h3gkt.cloudfront.net/m/uploads/downloadablepdfs/Lexiles-in-the-Library.pdf

  30. Relationship of Lexiles & Grade Levels • Column 2 shows the range of Lexiles in which the middle 50% of readers fall at a grade level. 25% of students fall below this range and 25% above. • Column 3 shows the typical range of reading material at a grade level. These are based on a 2009 study. • Column 4 are "stretch" text measures (defined in 2010 through studies related to the development of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts ) and represent the demand of text that students should be reading to be college and career ready by the end of Grade 12.  http://www.lexile.com/about-lexile/grade-equivalent/grade-equivalent-chart/

  31. Comparison of Various Reading Level Models

  32. Influences on student learningJohn Hattie 1999-2009 – research from 180,000 studies covering almost every method of innovation Feedback 0.73 • Teacher-Student Relationships 0.72 • Mastery Learning 0.58 • Challenge of Goals 0.56 • Peer Tutoring 0.55 • Expectations 0.43 • Homework 0.29 • Aims & Policies of the School 0.24 • Ability Grouping 0.12

  33. Setting Goals • There is strong evidence that challenging, achievable goals influence achievement, provided the individual is involved in setting them. • Locke & Latham (1990) found that achievement is enhanced to the degree that teachers set challenging, rather than “do your best” goals, relative to the students’ present competencies. There is a direct linear relationship between the degree of goal difficulty and performance . • Goals have a self-energizing effect if they are appropriately challenging as they can motivate students to exert effort in line with the difficulty or demands of the goal. • Commitment to the goals helps, but is not necessary for goal attainment – except for Special Needs students, where commitment makes a major difference.