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Today became GREAT when YOU arrived!. Welcome!. Today’s Agenda: I can explain the elements of differentiated instruction. I can use differentiated strategies to meet the diverse interests, learning profiles and readiness levels of my students. Jacque Melin melinj@gvsu.edu

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slide1

Today became GREAT

whenYOUarrived!

welcome
Welcome!

Today’s Agenda:

  • I can explain the elements of differentiated instruction.
  • I can use differentiated strategies to meet the diverse interests, learning profiles and readiness levels of my students.

Jacque Melin

melinj@gvsu.edu

www.formativedifferentiated.com

slide3

Most-Effective Teachers

J.W. Lloyd, E.J. Kameanui, and D. Chard (Eds.) (1997) Issues in educating students with disabilities.

shhhhh share 1 pick an activity 2 write or think quietly 3 be ready to share when time is called
SHHHHH/SHARE….1. Pick an activity 2. Write or think quietly 3. Be ready to share when time is called.
  • Explain to a new student teacher what differentiation is in terms of what he/she would be doing in the classroom – and why. The definition should help the new student teacher develop an image of differentiation in action.
  • Write a definition of differentiation you feel clarifies its key intent, elements and principles.
  • Develop a metaphor, analogy, or visual symbol that you think represents and clarifies what’s important to understand about differentiation.

From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

target
TARGET
  • I can explain the key elements of differentiated instruction.
slide7

Elements of Differentiation

Community

Curriculum

  • Teacher/Student Connections
  • Safe Environment
  • Shared Partnership

Assessment

  • Essential KUDs (Targets)
  • Engagement
  • Teaching up

Instruction

  • Pre-Assessments
  • Formative (on-going)
  • Assessments to inform instruction
  • 3-P Grading
  • Addressing Readiness, Interests, Learning Profiles
  • Multiple strategies
  • Flexible management

From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

common sense differentiation
Common Sense Differentiation
  • Create a learning environment that supports

the hard work of learning.

  • Be clear about the learning destination (TARGETS)
  • Know where students are in relation to the destination (FORMATIVE ASSESSMENTS)
  • Adjust teaching to make sure that students arrive at the destination (and move beyond it) (DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCITON)

COMMUNITY

CURRICULUM

ASSESSMENT

INSTRUCTION

From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

slide9

Differentiating Instruction…

IS…

is NOT…

Individualizing instruction

for each student

Providing instruction

to meet the range

of student needs

From Katie Ellis

slide10

Differentiating Instruction…

is NOT…

IS…

Using varied strategies that address students’ readiness, interests, and learning styles

Assigning all students

the same activities

all of the time

From Katie Ellis

slide11

Differentiating Instruction…

is NOT…

IS…

Using varied resources

for varied learners

Using the same instructional

materials for all students

From Katie Ellis

slide12

Differentiating Instruction…

is

is NOT…

IS…

Using multiple

means of assessment

Assessing all students’

learning in the same way

From Katie Ellis

slide13

Differentiation is NOT a set of strategies….

  • It’s a way of thinking about teaching and learning

Strategies are TOOLS

to accomplish the goals of DI.

They are no more differentiation

than a hammer and saw

are the house they help to build.

From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

1 quality di paving the way to learning
#1QUALITY DIPaving the way to learning
  • Mindset Connections Community

Quality DI Begins with a

growth mindset, moves to student-teacher connections, & evolves to community.

From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

the predictive power of mindset
The Predictive power of mindset
  • Fixed
    • Success comes from being smart
    • Genetics, environment determine what we can do
    • Some students are smart – some aren’t
    • Teachers cannot override students’ learning profiles.
  • Growth
    • Success comes from effort
    • With hard work, most students can do most things
    • Teachers can override students’ learning profiles
    • A key role of the teacher is to set high goals, provide high support, ensure student focus – to find the things that makes school work for a student.
    • C. Tomlinson, August 2010

Wildly Exciting Education

slide16

Fixed Mindset Growth Mindset

  • Challenges
    • Avoid challenges
  • Obstacles
    • Give up easily
  • Effort
    • See effort as fruitless or worse
  • Criticism
    • Ignore useful negative feedback
  • Success of Others
    • Feel threatened by the success of others
  • As a result, they may plateau early and achieve less than their full potential.
  • Challenges
    • Embrace challenges
  • Obstacles
    • Persist in the face of setbacks
  • Effort
    • See effort as a path to mastery
  • Criticism
    • Learn from criticism
  • Success of Others
    • Find lessons and inspiration in the success of others
  • As a result, they reach ever higher levels of achievement.

Carol Dweck, Ph.D

katie couric interview with captain sully sullenberger
Katie Couric interview with Captain Sully Sullenberger

Captain Sully Sullenberger

What do you find to be the most compelling thing he has to say? Why does it strike you as the most important?

What does any of this have to do with teaching?

2 quality di paving the way to learning
#2QUALITY DIPaving the way to learning

Is Rooted in Meaningful Curriculum

slide22
Clear Learning Targets shift us away from what we, as teachers, are covering towards what our students are learning.
slide23

Frayer Model

Definition

Facts/Characteristics

  • Measureable & attainable
  • Focus on intended learning
  • Focus on “chunks” of a standard
  • Clear, specific language
  • congruent to standard

Clear description

of what is to be learned;

Provides a clear vision

of the ‘destination’ for

student learning

Learning Target

Examples

Nonexamples

Adding Fractions

Do Exercise 3.7 on pg 148

Learning Activities

Tasks

Pre-Requisites

Assessments

I can add fractions with

unlike denominators.

I can identify the parts of a plant.

3 quality di paving the way to learning
#3QUALITY DIPaving the way to learning

Is guided by on-going assessment for planning and feedback (not grades)

4 quality di paving the way to learning
#4QUALITY DIPaving the way to learning

Addresses student readiness, interest and learning profile.

slide28

Steps to Create a Choice Lesson Differentiated

  • by Learning Preference, Interest or Readiness
  • Identify the subject and topic of study (unit).
  • Use curriculum documents to determine what you want the students to know, understand and be able to do (TARGETS).
  • Decide on an activity structure that will allow students to choose a task that interests them (e.g., choice boards, RAFT, cubing or thinkdot activity, learning contract, WebQuest, etc.)
  • Brainstorm a variety of tasks based on what you know about the learning preferences of your students.
  • Eliminate tasks that will not lead the students to TARGETS.
  • Choose the activities that will be the most engaging for your students and best match their learning preferences.
  • Check to see that all students will reach the same TARGETS, no matter which task(s) they complete.
  • Describe the learning activities in detail. Create student handouts, if appropriate.
  • Determine how student work will be assessed.
  • Decide how you will facilitate sharing and bring closure to the lesson.
slide29

Don’t Bother Differentiating FLUFF

If you are going to spend time planning to differentiate by interest, learning profile, or readiness, be sure to use key understanding!!!

shhhhh share 1 pick an activity 2 write or think quietly 3 be ready to share when time is called31
SHHHHH/SHARE….1. Pick an activity 2. Write or think quietly 3. Be ready to share when time is called.
  • Explain to a new student teacher what differentiation is in terms of what he/she would be doing in the classroom – and why. The definition should help the new student teacher develop an image of differentiation in action.
  • Write a definition of differentiation you feel clarifies its key intent, elements and principles.
  • Develop a metaphor, analogy, or visual symbol that you think represents and clarifies what’s important to understand about differentiation.

From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

slide32

Thinking About the Sternberg Intelligences

ANALYTICAL

Linear – Schoolhouse Smart - Sequential

Show the parts of _________ and how they work.

Explain why _______ works the way it does.

Diagram how __________ affects __________________.

Identify the key parts of _____________________.

Present a step-by-step approach to _________________.

Streetsmart – Contextual – Focus on Use

PRACTICAL

Demonstrate how someone uses ________ in their life or work.

Show how we could apply _____ to solve this real life problem ____.

Based on your own experience, explain how _____ can be used.

Here’s a problem at school, ________. Using your knowledge of ______________, develop a plan to address the problem.

CREATIVE

Innovator – Outside the Box – What If - Improver

Find a new way to show _____________.

Use unusual materials to explain ________________.

Use humor to show ____________________.

Explain (show) a new and better way to ____________.

Make connections between _____ and _____ to help us understand ____________.

Become a ____ and use your “new” perspectives to help us think about ____________.

slide33

Story Response: Choice Board

(Triarchic Intelligences)

TARGET:

I can describe the theme or message that a writer or author wants to communicate.

slide35

Food Pyramid: Choice Board

(Triarchic Intelligences)

TARGET:

I can explain the changes in the food pyramid.

slide37

Immigration: Choice Board

(Triarchic Intelligences)

TARGET:

I can explain the meaning of “melting pot,” “mosaic,” and “salad bowl” as they relate to immigration in America.

slide39

Dividing Fractions: Choice Board

(Triarchic Intelligences)

TARGET:

I can explain and apply fraction division.

slide41

Spelling: Tic-Tac-Toe Board

(Multiple Intelligences)

TARGET:

I can use spelling patterns to help me spell new words.

slide43

Vocabulary: Tic-Tac-Toe Board

(Multiple Intelligences)

Target:

I can use strategies to help me decode unknown words.

slide45

Story Elements: Tic-Tac-Toe Board

(Auditory, Visual, Kinesthetic)

Target:

I can describe the elements of a story (characters, setting, plot).

slide46

Novel Think Tac-Toe Directions: Select and complete one activity from each horizontal row to help you and others think about your novel. Remember to make your work thoughtful, original, rich with detail, and accurate.

Novel Title: ____________________ Author:_______________________

Activities Selected: _______, _____, _____

Student: ______________________

slide47

Counting Principles & Probability: Tic-Tac-Toe Board

  • (Auditory, Visual, Kinesthetic)
  • Targets:
  • I can write the steps of a math induction proof for a given series.
  • I can apply Pascal’s Triangle to find the coefficients of a binomial expansion.
  • I can apply the Binomial Theorem to expand a binomial.
  • I can find probabilities of mutually exclusive & independent events.
slide49

Paul Revere’s Ride:

  • Tic-Tac-Toe BoardTargets:
  • I can analyze situations that illustrate conflicts between conscience and respect for authority
  • I can identify key terms: King George III, Proclamation of 1763, Quartering Act, revenue, Sugar Act, Stamp Act, Patrick Henry, boycott, Sons of Liberty, Crispus Attucks, the Townshend Acts, writs of assistance, Samuel Adams, Boston Massacre, John Adams, committee of correspondence, Boston Tea Party, militia, Minutemen, Intolerable Acts, First Continental Congress, Paul Revere, Lexington and Concord, Loyalist, Patriot, mercenary
slide51

Early Republic & Expansion:

Tic-Tac-Toe BoardTargets:

Box 1: I can describe the precedents established by the Washington Administration.

Box 2: I can identify the costs and benefits of the Louisiana Purchase, explaining why Americans migrated west, include Lewis and Clark, their group, and their effectiveness in expanding our claim.

Box 3: I can identify the successes and failures of the Jefferson Administration.

Box 4: I can describe the major battles/events of the War of 1812

Box 5: I can identify the successes and failures of the Washington, Adams, Jefferson and Madison Administrations.

Box 6: I can describe the major battles/events of the War of 1812

Box 7: I can describe the foreign policy of the Monroe Administration in relation to Spain, Central and South America, including evaluating the Monroe Doctrine.

Box 9: I can identify the successes and failures of the Washington, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison Administrations.

slide54

Key:

A = advanced or complex activities written at the analysis, evaluation, or synthesis of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

B = basic activities written at the application level.

slide55

Projects are arranged so that any way the student completes the TTT requires they do at least one advanced activity.Non-Fiction Books – I can recall facts from an expository book.

slide56

Establishes the rule that each student’s TTT route must cross through the middle.Fiction Books – I can state the main ideas about the events and characters in a fiction book.

slide57

Multiple Versions –

“Prescribe” particular boards to particular students based on their current learning needs.

slide58

Remember –

ALL students deserve challenging, engaging activities.

basic version solar system i can describe the major heavenly bodies of the solar system
Basic VersionSolar System – I can describe the major heavenly bodies of the solar system.
slide61

Poetry: Learning Menu

Probability: Learning Menu

Music: Learning Menu

Targets:

Not determined

slide66

Show-And-Tell Boards

All students have the same TASK, but have a choice of SHOW AND TELL.

Top row – what they could show

Bottom row – what they could tell

Need 1 SHOW & 1 TELL

slide67
TARGET: I can write in a technical format.TASK: Write a set of directions for a household task or school activity.
slide68

TARGET: I can describe events that occurred during the civil rights movementTASK: Describe a significant event that occurred during the civil rights movement.

slide69

Vocabulary Words: Choice Board

TARGET:

I can define vocabulary terms.

slide70

Language Arts:

Choice Board

Sketch

Definition in own words

Word

Example

Nonexample

Something I can use to help me remember the definition.

Word

Like the word

Unlike the word

Word

A sketch of what the word reminds me of.

What the word means in my own words.

Diagram

Example

slide71

Graphing:

Cubes (novelty)

TARGET:

I can solve a problem in a variety of ways.

slide73

Ancient Civilizations: Cubing

(Multiple Intelligences)

Learning Goals: Students will –

Know: The geographic, political, economic, religious, cultural, and social structures of an ancient civilization.

Understand: Our understanding of why civilizations dominate or decline can be expanded by studying the people and events of ancient civilization.

Do: I can create a product that demonstrates an understanding of aspects of ancient civilizations.

slide74

Ancient Civilizations Topic Cube

Describe the economy

Describe some of the main cultural activities.

Describe the type of government or leadership that was present.

Describe the traditions and beliefs.

Roll the topic cube to determine the topic that will be explored.

Roll the product cube to determine how understanding of the topic will be represented.

Identify the location of the civilization and describe the connections between the geography and development of the civilization.

Describe the social system.

slide75

Ancient Civilizations Product Cube

Brochure

Original song or rhyme adapted from a nursery rhyme

Public Service Announcement

Talk Show

Roll the topic cube to determine the topic that will be explored.

Roll the product cube to determine how understanding of the topic will be represented.

Chart or graphic organizer

Advice Column

slide76

Book Report: Story Events Cube

(Multiple Intelligences)

TARGET:

I can describe the main events of a chosen book.

slide78

Solar System: Cubing

(Visual, Auditory, Kinesthetic)

TARGET:

I can demonstrate an understanding of the objects in our solar system and their path around the sun.

slide79

Create a poster or mural that shows the different objects in the solar system and their path around the sun.

Create a three dimensional model that shows the different objects in the solar system and their path around the sun.

Create a play that shows the different objects in the solar system and their path around the sun.

Create a song, rap or poem that tells about the different objects in the solar system and their path around the sun.

Create a journal from the point of view of the sun. Talk about the different objects that rotate around you.

Create a story (oral or written) about the different objects in the solar system and their path around the sun.

slide80

Parts of Speech: RAFT

TARGET:

I can describe the parts of speech (e.g. nouns, verbs, adverbs, and so on).

hold a parts of speech fair
Hold a “Parts of Speech Fair”
  • ½ the students present their projects simultaneously in different parts of the room.
  • The other ½ are fair-goers who visit each student, who explains or performs his or her project.
  • Fair-goers use the following chart to summarize what they learn.
  • Switch roles and repeat.
slide84

Fahrenheit 451: RAFT

  • TARGET:
  • I can identify specific characteristics of a character.
  • I can write with the voice of a character.
  • I can find evidence to support my perspective and include it in my letter.
  • I can correctly address an envelope.
slide86

Solve absolute value equations and inequalities and justify steps in the solution: RAFT

  • TARGET:
  • I can…
  • Solve absolute value equations.
  • Explain the steps in solving absolute value equations.
  • Identify “no solution” scenarios.
  • Identify extraneous solutions.
  • Solve absolute value inequalities.
  • Explain the steps in solving absolute value inequalities.
  • Tell if an absolute value inequality is always, sometimes, or never true.
review the strategies for interest
Review the strategies for INTEREST
  • Tri-mind choices (Sternberg)
  • Tic Tac Toe choice boards
  • Learning Menus
  • Show and Tell boards
  • Cubes
  • RAFTS

With a partner:

Describe your upcoming unit and a TARGET or 2 that you will be addressing

Choose one of the above strategies and describe how you will use it in your classroom.

How will you connect this learning activity to the TARGET(s)

slide89

Tier by:

  • Readiness
  • Degree of structure
  • Need for support
slide90

Task Cards/Work Cards

Write a letter to yourself stating at least five key points that you would like to remember about this presentation and how you will use these things in your classroom.

Write a letter to your principal comparing what you learned today to what is happening in your school.

Write a persuasive letter to your school board president convincing him/her that your school district must adopt the philosophy of differentiated instruction in your district.

tips for writing task cards work cards
Tips for Writing Task Cards/Work Cards
  • Make sure the directions are clearly stated in student-friendly language.
  • Include specific details (e.g., “Give a minimum of three examples)
  • Include criteria for quality or a rubric so students clearly know your expectations for their work.
  • As appropriate, sequence the steps students need to follow.
  • Include examples or samples of work as necessary.
  • Explain how students will share their work.
  • Double-check that the directions can be followed by students independently.
slide92

Tiered assignments should be:

-Different work, not simply more or less work

-Equally active

-Equally interesting and engaging

-Fair in terms of work expectations and time needed

-Require the use of key concepts, skills, or ideas

-Are used as practice or daily work, NOT as an assessment task to be graded.

-Learn from each other – share work!

tiering by readiness level physical science hs
Tiering by Readiness LevelPhysical Science - HS

TARGET

I can examine sources of energy: fossil fuels, nuclear fission, wind, solar, and tidal energy.

tiering by readiness level physical science hs94
Tiering by Readiness LevelPhysical Science - HS

On-Target Tier for Most Students (grade level)

  • Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of each energy source.
  • Present critical facts in a PowerPoint presentation.
tiering by readiness level physical science hs95
Tiering by Readiness LevelPhysical Science - HS

Advanced Tier for Gifted Students

  • Analyze and evaluate the arguments for each energy source, focusing on the environmental and financial impacts of each choice.
  • Present critical facts and your own analysis in a PowerPoint presentation.
tiering by readiness level physical science hs96
Tiering by Readiness LevelPhysical Science - HS

Modified/Adapted Tier for Special Needs Students

  • Identify critical facts about each energy source that should be considered as we examine our future energy needs as a nation.
  • Present bulleted lists of critical facts in a PowerPoint presentation.
slide97

Experimental Design: Tiered Assignment

Cubes or Think Dots

TARGET:

I can explain the various stages in the experimental design process.

slide98

1. Name and define the 6 steps in the experimental design process.

5. Suppose an experimental design process with several trials showed that chickens lay more eggs when listening to music. What additional questions would a scientist ask about this experiment?

2. Design a question that would have an independent and a dependent variable. Label each variable.

6. Create a data chart for an experiment that has an independent and dependent variable. Graph this data and label the graph properly.

3. Change a question into a hypothesis.

4. Change a hypothesis into a prediction statement using IF…, And…, Then...

slide99

Basic

Basic

.What are the 6 steps of the experimental design process?

.Explain the difference between an independent and dependent variable.

3. Write a hypothesis from this question:

Does listening to music cause chickens to lay more eggs?

.Using If…, And… Then…, write a prediction statement for the following hypothesis:

Listening to music causes chickens to lay more eggs

5. Make a double T chart that would compare an experiment where music is played for one group of chickens and not for another to see if music affects the number of eggs they lay. Label each variable.

6. Make a graph using the following information. Label which axis is the independent and dependent variable.

Not playing music—5 chickens lay 17 eggs.

Playing music—5 chickens lay 25 eggs.

.What are the 6 steps of the experimental design process?

.Explain the difference between an independent and dependent variable.

3. Write a hypothesis from this question:

Does listening to music cause chickens to lay more eggs?

.Using If…, And… Then…, write a prediction statement for the following hypothesis:

Listening to music causes chickens to lay more eggs

5. Make a double T chart that would compare an experiment where music is played for one group of chickens and not for another to see if music affects the number of eggs they lay. Label each variable.

6. Make a graph using the following information. Label which axis is the independent and dependent variable.

Not playing music—5 chickens lay 17 eggs.

Playing music—5 chickens lay 25 eggs.

slide100

Basic Cube Record Sheet

.STEPS

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

.WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

Independent Variable -

Dependent Variable -

.MUSICAL EGGS

Question: Does listening to music cause chickens to lay more eggs?

Hypothesis:

.PREDICTING EGGS

Hypothesis: Listening to music causes chickens to lay more eggs.

Prediction:

If…

And…

Then…

5. DOUBLE “T” 6. GRAPH IT

review the strategies for readiness
Review the strategies for READINESS
  • Task cards
  • Think dots

With a partner:

Describe your upcoming unit and a TARGET or 2 that you will be addressing

Choose one of the above strategies and describe how you will use it in your classroom.

How will you connect this learning activity to the TARGET(s)

what is your preferred learning profile
What is your preferred Learning Profile?
  • Write
  • Draw
  • Act
  • Sing
  • Build

http://www.niehs.nih.gov/kids/music.htm#index

differentiation profiler
Differentiation “Profiler”
  • You have just attended a stimulating workshop on differentiated instruction and you feel motivated to let the world know more about differentiated instruction. Your “world” might be a group of students, parents, fellow teachers, and/or the general public. You will join a group of workshop participants who are as motivated as you are and share your excitement about differentiate instruction to spread the news about this teaching and learning philosophy!

TARGET:

I can explain key elements of differentiated instruction.

differentiation musician
Differentiation “Musician”

Your mission is to write and perform a song (any style of

music) about the experience of observing in a

classroom which is focused on developing units and

using strategies that help to differentiated instruction.

You can make up a new tune or write new lyrics that fit

with an existing melody.

  • You should have at least one verse about each of the FOUR elements that should be the focus of a differentiated classroom.
  • Include a chorus about the goal of differentiated instruction.
  • Make it personal and fun.
differentiation writers
Differentiation “Writers”

Your task is to write an article for USA Today telling the

public how differentiated instruction helps teacher to meet

the needs of diverse learners in their classrooms. You

should minimally include the following information:

  • How students differ as learners.
  • How student learning differences affect how students learn.
  • Evidence you have that explains that students work harder when what they are asked to do connect to something they are interested in doing and/or connects to their learning profile.
  • Identify classroom techniques/strategies that support the achievement of students who have different readiness levels, different interests and/or different learning profiles.
differentiation builders
Differentiation “Builders”
  • Your group has been commissioned to build a model of a differentiated classroom for a local museum featuring best practices in education. Your model must accurately reflect the FOUR elements of differentiated instruction in a classroom where these elements are being practiced. You must be able to explain your model to museum officials.
differentiation actors
Differentiation “Actors”

Your job is to create and perform an episode of a

children's or teenager’s television program. This

episode should be all about differentiated

instruction.

  • Be sure to include the following information:
  • What is differentiated instruction.
  • What it is like being in a classroom where differentiated instruction is practiced.
  • How you (the student) will benefit from being in a classroom where differentiated instruction is practiced.
differentiation artists
Differentiation “Artists”
  • Create a poster – or series of posters – that clearly illustrates the key points of what it means to differentiate instruction. Your poster(s) will be designed for those who are unable to read, so it/they must communicate clearly through pictures and graphics, and should not rely heavily on captions. Your posters should depict the three sets of FOUR elements of differentiated instruction. Poster paper, markers and other materials are available; let your instructor know what else you need.
review the strategies for learning profile
Review the strategies for LEARNING PROFILE
  • The “Profiler”

With a partner:

Describe your upcoming unit and a TARGET or 2 that you will be addressing

Describe how you will use this strategy in your classroom.

How will you connect this learning activity to the TARGET(s)