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Hepatitis for the young doctors
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  1. Hepatitisfor the young doctors Salem M. Bazarah, MD, M.Ed. FACP, FRCPC, FRCPC (GI) & PhD Department of Medicine KAU

  2. We are here to listen to our speaker not to the mauled of your cell phone

  3. Objectives • What is hepatitis? • What are the causes? • What is the pathophysiology? • How does it present clinically? • How do we diagnose it? • How do we treat it? • What is the out come?

  4. What is hepatitis? • Inflammation of the liver parenchyma that leads to variable degree of damage to liver cells (hepatocytes) and architecture • Acute and/or Chronic

  5. What is the pathophysiology? • Know it from the expert

  6. What are the causes? • Viral infection: hepatitis A, B, (D), C, E, EBV, CMV, & others • Non viral infection: Toxoplasmagondii, Leptospira, Coxellaburnetii (Q fever) • Drugs: Paractamol, alcohol, mushrooms, aflatoxins, Carbon tetra chloride • Autoimmune: AIH, PBC • Others: Pregnancy, Circulatory inuficiency

  7. How does it present clinically • Fever:

  8. Clinical presentation • Jaundice:

  9. Clinical Presentation • RUQ Pain:

  10. Clinical Presentation • Nausea & Vomiting:

  11. Physical examination • Ill looking • Jaundice • RUQ tenderness • High temperature • Hepatomegally (tender)

  12. How do we diagnose it? • Knowing the pathophysiology helps a lot • Two main investigation component • Blood work • immaging

  13. Blood work • Liver function test • Cell injury: transaminases (ALT & AST) • Billiary damage: ALP & GGT • Excretory dysfunction: Bilirubin (T, C, Un C) • Synthetic dysfunction: Albumin, Coagulation profile (INR, PT & PTT)

  14. Blood work • Serology: viral Abs and Agse.g HAV IgA & IgG, HBsAg, HBcAb, HCV Ab • Autoimmune profile: ANA, ASMA, AMA • Drug levels • CBC • Urea, Createnine & electrolytes • Body fluid cultures

  15. Imaging • Abdominal ultrasound • CT/MRI/MRCP

  16. Examples

  17. Viral Hepatitis - Historical Perspectives Enterically transmitted “Infectious” A E Viral hepatitis NANB Parenterally transmitted B D C “Serum” F, G, TTV ? other

  18. Type of Hepatitis A B C D E Source of feces blood/ blood/ blood/ feces virus blood-derived blood-derived blood-derived body fluids body fluids body fluids Route of fecal-oral percutaneous percutaneous percutaneous fecal-oral transmission permucosal permucosal permucosal Chronic no yes yes yes no infection Prevention pre/post- pre/post- blood donor pre/post- ensure safe exposure exposure screening; exposure drinking immunization immunization risk behavior immunization; water modification risk behavior modification

  19. Hepatitis A Virus • Naked RNA virus • Related to enteroviruses, formerly known as enterovirus 72, now put in its own family: heptovirus • One stable serotype only

  20. Hepatitis A - Clinical Features • Incubation period: Average 30 days Range 15-50 days • Jaundice by <6 yrs, <10%age group: 6-14 yrs, 40%-50% >14 yrs, 70%-80% • Complications: Fulminant hepatitis Cholestatic hepatitis Relapsing hepatitis • Chronic sequelae: None

  21. Hepatitis A Infection Typical Serological Course Total anti-HAV Symptoms Titre ALT Fecal HAV IgM anti-HAV 4 5 6 12 24 0 1 2 3 Months after exposure

  22. Hepatitis A Virus Transmission • Close personal contact(e.g., household contact, sex contact, child day care centers) • Contaminated food, water(e.g., infected food handlers, raw shellfish) • Blood exposure (rare)(e.g., injecting drug use, transfusion)

  23. Hepatitis B Virus - Virology • Double stranded DNA virus • Replication involves a reverse transcriptase. • Complete Dane particle 42 nm, 28 nm electron dense core, containing HBcAg and HBeAg. The coat and the 22 nm free particles contain HBsAg • At least 4 phenotypes of HBsAg are recognized; adw, adr, ayw and ayr. • The HBcAg is of a single serotype • Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been classified into 8 genotypes (A-H). • It has not yet been possible to propagate the virus in cell culture.

  24. Hepatitis B - Clinical Features • Incubation period: Average 60-90 days Range 45-180 days • Clinical illness (jaundice): <5 yrs, <10% 5 yrs, 30%-50% • Acute case-fatality rate: 0.5%-1% • Chronic infection: <5 yrs, 30%-90% 5 yrs, 2%-10% • Premature mortality fromchronic liver disease: 15%-25%

  25. Spectrum of Chronic Hepatitis B Diseases 1Chronic Persistent Hepatitis - asymptomatic 2. Chronic Active Hepatitis - symptomatic exacerbations of hepatitis 3. Cirrhosis of Liver 4. Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  26. Acute Hepatitis B Virus Infection with Recovery Typical Serologic Course Symptoms anti-HBe HBeAg Total anti-HBc Titre anti-HBs IgM anti-HBc HBsAg 0 4 8 12 16 24 28 32 52 100 20 36 Weeks after Exposure

  27. Progression to Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection Typical Serologic Course Acute (6 months) Chronic (Years) HBeAg anti-HBe HBsAg Total anti-HBc Titre IgM anti-HBc Years 0 4 8 16 20 24 28 36 12 32 52 Weeks after Exposure

  28. Outcome of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by Age at Infection 100 100 80 80 Chronic Infection (%) 60 60 Chronic Infection Symptomatic Infection (%) 40 40 Chronic Infection (%) 20 20 Symptomatic Infection 0 0 1-6 months 7-12 months Older Children and Adults Birth 1-4 years Age at Infection

  29. Concentration of Hepatitis B Virus in Various Body Fluids Low/Not High Moderate Detectable blood semen urine serum vaginal fluid feces wound exudates saliva sweat tears breastmilk

  30. Hepatitis B Virus Modes of Transmission • Sexual - sex workers and homosexuals are particular at risk. • Parenteral - IVDA, Health Workers are at increased risk. • Perinatal - Mothers who are HBeAg positive are much more likely to transmit to their offspring than those who are not. Perinatal transmission is the main means of transmission in high prevalence populations.

  31. Hepatitis C Virus • RNA Virus • HCV has been classified into a total of six genotypes (type 1 to 6) on the basis of phylogenetic analysis • Genotype 1 and 4 has a poorer prognosis and response to interferon therapy, • In Hong Kong, genotype 1 accounts for around 67% of cases and genotype 6 around 25%.

  32. Hepatitis C - Clinical Features Incubation period: Average 6-7 wks Range 2-26 wks Clinical illness (jaundice): 30-40% (20-30%) Chronic hepatitis: 70% Persistent infection: 85-100% Immunity: No protective antibody response identif

  33. Hepatitis C Virus Infection Typical Serologic Course anti-HCV Symptoms Titre ALT Normal 6 1 2 3 4 0 1 2 3 4 5 Months Years Time after Exposure

  34. Risk Factors Associated with Transmission of HCV • Transfusion or transplant from infected donor • Injecting drug use • Hemodialysis (yrs on treatment) • Accidental injuries with needles/sharps • Sexual/household exposure to anti-HCV-positive contact • Multiple sex partners • Birth to HCV-infected mother

  35. Treatment

  36. Treatment • Prevention • Treatment

  37. Hepatitis A Prevention - Immune Globulin • Pre-exposure • travelers to intermediate and high HAV-endemic regions • Post-exposure (within 14 days) Routine • household and other intimate contacts Selected situations • institutions (e.g., day care centers) • common source exposure (e.g., food prepared by infected food handler)

  38. Prevention of HBV • Vaccination - highly effective recombinant vaccines are now available. Vaccine can be given to those who are at increased risk of HBV infection such as health care workers. It is also given routinely to neonates as universal vaccination in many countries. • Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin - HBIG may be used to protect persons who are exposed to hepatitis B. It is particular efficacious within 48 hours of the incident. It may also be given to neonates who are at increased risk of contracting hepatitis B i.e. whose mothers are HBsAg and HBeAg positive. • Other measures - screening of blood donors, blood and body fluid precautions.

  39. Prevention of Hepatitis C • Screening of blood, organ, tissue donors • High-risk behavior modification • Blood and body fluid precautions

  40. Specific Treatments • Interferon • Ribaverin • Nucleotides and Nucleosides

  41. Thank You for listening