Download
living nonliving characteristics n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
LIVING & NONLIVING CHARACTERISTICS PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
LIVING & NONLIVING CHARACTERISTICS

LIVING & NONLIVING CHARACTERISTICS

140 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

LIVING & NONLIVING CHARACTERISTICS

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. LIVING&NONLIVINGCHARACTERISTICS

  2. Characteristics of Living Things 1. Made of cells-- microscope invention

  3. …or just one cell.

  4. 2. Reproduce - The way organisms make new ones. • Asexual reproduction - single individual that produces offspring that are identical to the parent. E.g. new cells, bacteria, yeast

  5. Sexual reproduction - Two parents and the offspring are not identical to their parents. E.g. Sperm and egg during fertilization.

  6. 3. Universal genetic code- DNA structure is the same for all organisms.

  7. 4. Growth and Development -cells differentiating and then getting bigger • synthesis--making new molecules

  8. 5. Obtain and use materials and energy-- • Metabolism--chemical reactions that build up and break down substances • Respiration--production of energy • Autotrophs--make their own food (plants) • Heterotrophs--must consume food (animals)

  9. 6. Respond to their environment- Direct and immediate response to stimuli.

  10. 7. Change over time-Adaptation to environment--prolonged response.

  11. 8. Homeostasis--maintain a stable internal environment • Body regulation is controlled by hormones

  12. For thousands of years….. • People believed that living organisms could arise spontaneously, or naturally, in a few ays or weeks from nonliving matter. This idea is called spontaneous generation, or abiogenesis. Belief in spontaneous generation was based on common observations and intuitions: The ancient Egyptians, seeing frogs and snakes coming out of the mud of the Nile River, concluded that these animals were formed from the mud.

  13. The Greek philosopher Aristotle reasoned that an “active principle” was responsible for life. This active principle was thought to be present in that mud.

  14. History • 1600’s--Jan Baptista van Helmont believed wheat grains were changed into mice with a “sweaty shirt active principle”. Did early experiments. • Mid 1600’s--Anton van Leeuwenhoek looked at microorganisms “spontaneously” grow from dirt using the microscope. • Meanwhile--Francesco Redi experimented to see if maggots really arose from rotting meat.

  15. http://phschool.com/webcodes10/index.cfm?wcprefix=cbp&wcsuffix=1012&fuseaction=home.gotoWebCode&x=15&y=15http://phschool.com/webcodes10/index.cfm?wcprefix=cbp&wcsuffix=1012&fuseaction=home.gotoWebCode&x=15&y=15 • http://phschool.com/webcodes10/index.cfm?wcprefix=cbp&wcsuffix=1012&fuseaction=home.gotoWebCode&x=15&y=15

  16. Many tried to show that organisms would not grow if meat was boiled, etc…but it was claimed that the “active principle” was killed off. • Enter…… • 1860’s--Louis Pasteur • http://phschool.com/webcodes10/index.cfm?wcprefix=cbp&wcsuffix=1012&fuseaction=home.gotoWebCode&x=15&y=15

  17. Abiogenesis- the thought that life can come from nonliving things. Also known as “spontaneous generation”. • Biogenesis- Life arising from living things. What did Redi’s experiment bring to the science community?

  18. The Scientific Method Controlled experiments where one variable at a time is tested.

  19. http://www.ucsd.tv/miller-urey/