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Beefing up your writing. FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE . The following are examples of figurative language and literary devices:. Imagery . Language that appeals to the senses. Descriptions of people or objects stated in terms of our senses. • Sight • Hearing • Touch • Taste • Smell . Simile.

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FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE

  • The following are examples of figurative language and literary devices:
imagery
Imagery
  • Language that appeals to the senses. Descriptions of people or objects stated in terms of our senses.
  • • Sight
  • • Hearing
  • • Touch
  • • Taste
  • • Smell
simile
Simile
  • A figure of speech which involves a direct comparison between two unlike things, usually with the words like or as.

Example: The muscles on his brawny arms are as strong as iron bands.

metaphor
Metaphor
  • A figure of speech which involves an implied comparison between two relatively unlike things using a form of be. The comparison is not announced by like or as.

Example: The road was a ribbon wrapping through the desolate desert.

personification
Personification
  • A figure of speech which gives the qualities of a person to an animal, an object, or an idea.

Example: “The wind screamed its fury as it pushed us down the road with the strength of a bull.”

The wind cannot yell. Only a living thing can yell.

personification1
Personification

Examples:

  • The sleeping water reflected the evening sky.
  • Humidity breathed in the girl's face and ran its greasy fingers through her hair.
  • The tree arrested the oncoming car.

Joyet 2004

onomatopoeia
Onomatopoeia
  • The use of words that mimic sounds.

Example: The firecracker made a loud ka-boom!

alliteration
Alliteration
  • Repeated consonant sounds occurring at the beginning of words or within words.

Example: She was wide-eyed and wondering while she waited for Walter to waken.

hyperbole
Hyperbole
  • An exaggerated statement used to heighten effect. It is not used to mislead the reader, but to emphasize a point.

Example: She’s said so on several million occasions.

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Why is it important to learn about figurative language?

  • Sports
      • “When you get on that field I want you to be a tank- roll through everything on the field to get that touchdown, no matter who’s in your way.”
      • “His team is the underdog in this game.”
      • “The coach encouraged his players to make mincemeat of the other team.”
      • “The batter knocked the stuffing out of the ball.”
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Why is it important to learn about figurative language?

  • Business
      • “That project was a total bomb.”
      • “I want you to go out there and hit a homerun with this presentation.”
      • “Putting him in charge is like having the blind lead the blind.”
      • “Your plan is as easy to follow as a map.”
      • “The instructions you wrote me were as clear as mud.”
      • I found an article for business people about using metaphors to motivate your team: comparing selling a product to baking a cake, playing a sport, or running a marathon.
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Why is it important to learn about figurative language?

  • In the movies
      • Forrest Gump: “Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you’re gonna get.”
      • Mean girls: “I have this theory, that if you cut off all her hair she'd look like a British man.”
      • Toy Story: “That wasn't flying; that was falling with style.”
      • Many movies are even built around a metaphor or personification, like Finding Nemo, where fish are like people.
  • And comedy
      • “My sister wore so much makeup she had to use a chisel to get it off every night.”
      • There’s an article for comedians about making jokes, and two of the tips were about using similes and metaphors.
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Why is it important to learn about figurative language?

  • And music
      • Nelly- “I’m like Sprint and Motorola… no service, out of your range.”
      • ‘N Sync- “Your love is like a river, peaceful and deep. Your soul is like a secret that I could never keep”
      • Outkast- “Shake it like a Polaroid picture”
      • Switchfoot- “Yesterday is a wrinkle on your forehead. Yesterday is a promise that you've broken.”
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Why is it important to learn about figurative language?

  • Music
      • Nelly- “I’m like Sprint and Motorola… no service, out of your range.”
      • ‘N Sync- Your love is like a river, peaceful and deep. Your soul is like a secret that I could never keep”
      • Outkast- “Shake it like a Polaroid picture”
      • Switchfoot- “Yesterday is a wrinkle on your forehead. Yesterday is a promise that you've broken.”
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Lets Review

  • What techniques did we learn first in writing descriptive paragraphs?
    • Using our Senses
      • Sight
      • Sound
      • Smell
      • Taste
      • Touch/ Feeling
    • Using Onomatopoeia
      • Oooh!
      • Tick Tock
      • Kaboom!
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Painting a word picture

  • The dog is carrying a stick.
  • The German Shepherd is carrying a big stick.
  • As he carries the small tree he has just uprooted, the lop-eared German Shepherd tilts his head and walks unsteadily, dragging his heavy burden back to his master and looking like a proud athlete who has just won a trophy.
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Using Figurative Language

  • Similes and Metaphors
    • Making comparisons between two very different objects, feelings, or situations
  • Hyperbole
    • Using exaggeration
  • Show-Don’t-Tell
    • Using descriptive writing to show what happens rather than telling the reader
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Similies and Metaphors

  • Simile
    • Using the words like or as to compare one object or person to another object or person (The 2 things must be very different)
      • Examples:
        • DJ was as fast as a cheetah.
        • The news hit Estevan like a ton of bricks.
  • Metaphor
    • Applying a word or phrase to somebody or something that is not meant literally but to compare.
      • Examples:
        • Joe was an animal on the football field.
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Similies and Metaphors

  • It was a cold day.
  • Chris was so cold that he felt like his nose was frozen and his fingers were going to fall off.
  • Vincent’s mom said, “There’s no way you’re going out there, It’s as cold as ice!”
  • Cindy’s Dad told her she’d be walking into an icebox when she walked outside.
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Hyperbole

  • Using exaggeration to describe a scene
    • Examples:
      • Ms. Crane was so sad she could have cried a river.
      • Irvin was so hungry he could have eaten a horse.
      • Adelene had a million things to do that day.
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Hyperbole

  • The person was happy to get a letter.
  • When Chris got his birthday money in the mail he thought he would burst with joy.
  • Amber was so happy she was walking on air after she read the letter from her best friend.
  • Anessa was so happy she felt like she was on the top of the world.
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Show-Don't-Tell

  • Using descriptive language to paint a picture of the scene rather than telling the reader what is happening.
    • Examples
      • Instead of “Benito was angry…”
      • “Benito stomped up the steps to his room, slammed the door, and sat fuming at his desk.”
      • Instead of “It was a hot day…”
      • “You couldn’t go down the slide unless you wanted to get a third degree burn on your backside. Everyone in Mr. Derose’s class ended up sitting under the trees in the shade.”
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Show-Don't-Tell

  • The Boy was frustrated.
  • Santos crumpled up his third attempt at a descriptive paragraph and threw his pencil down in disgust.
  • Alonso had been writing for the past hour and a half and all he had to show for it was a bad headache and two sentences. “I give up!” he cried.
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Practice Makes Perfect...

Please rewrite the sentences on your worksheet so that they show, rather than tell, the main point. I would like everyone to share their best one with the class.