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Prevention Extension Workshop Series. Community Action to Reduce Binge Drinking. Brought to you by the Community Prevention Institute through its contract with the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs. Definition.

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community action to reduce binge drinking

Prevention Extension Workshop Series

Community Action to Reduce Binge Drinking

Brought to you by the Community Prevention Institute through its contract with the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs

definition
Definition
  • Binge (High risk ) drinking is the consumption of alcohol to the extent that harmful consequences - health, academic, legal, and others - may be expected.
quantity and frequency of alcohol use
Quantity and Frequency ofAlcohol Use
  • In 2002, 51 percent of persons aged 12 or older were current drinkers.
  • Current drinkers aged 12 to 17 and young adults aged 18 to 25 drank more drinks per day on the days they drank alcohol than adults aged 26 or older.
  • Current drinkers aged 18-25 were more likely to drive under the influence of alcohol during the past year than drinkers aged 26 or older.

Source: The National Survey on Drug Use and Health, SAMHSA, Dec, 2003.

alcohol use and risks among young adults
Alcohol Use and Risks amongYoung Adults
  • Almost 2 in 5 young adults, aged 18-24, regardless of college enrollment, reported binge drinking.
  • Full-time students, aged 18-21 had higher rates of binge drinking than nonstudents (c. 40-60%)
  • Nonstudents, aged 18-21, reported binge rates of c. 30%-45%.

Source: The National Survey on Drug Use and Health, SAMHSA, Dec, 2003.

alcohol use and risks among young adults1
Alcohol Use and Risks amongYoung Adults
  • Non students were less likely than full-time students to use seat belts while driving
  • Non students were less likely than full-time students to drive while under the influence of alcohol

Source: The National Survey on Drug Use and Health, SAMHSA, Dec, 2003.

alcohol use and risks among young adults2
Alcohol Use and Risks among Young Adults
  • In 1999, 44% of college students reported binge drinking, the same rate as in 1993.
  • Nearly 70% of binge-drinking college students began binge drinking in high school.

Source: Henry Wechsler, !999 College Alcohol Study, Harvard School of Public Health.

students reporting drinking in the last 30 days
Students Reporting Drinking In The Last 30 Days:
  • 20% of 8th graders
  • 35% of 10th graders
  • 49% of 12th graders

Source: Monitoring the Future national results on adolescent drug use: Overview of key findings, 2002. (NIH Publication No. 03-5374). Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse.

frequent intoxication 5 drinks per occasion within the last two weeks
Frequent intoxication (5+ drinks per occasion within the last two weeks)
  • 12% of 8th graders
  • 22% of 10th graders
  • 29% of 12th graders

Source: Monitoring the Future national results on adolescent drug use: Overview of key findings, 2002. (NIH Publication No. 03-5374). Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse.

second hand effects impact on the individual
Second-hand Effects:Impact on the Individual
  • Unplanned/unprotected sex
  • Fights, sexual assault
  • Traffic & other injuries or fatalities
  • Damage to physical, cognitive & social development
  • School performance
  • Contributes to homicides/suicides
second hand effects impact on the community
Second-hand Effects:Impact on the Community
  • Vandalism and property damage
  • Increased noise, trash
  • Costs related to increased police calls, emergency/medical services, lost productivity, etc.
effective practices at the community level 1
EFFECTIVE PRACTICES AT THE COMMUNITY LEVEL 1
  • Increased enforcement of MLDA (Minimum Legal Drinking Age) laws
  • Implementation, increased publicity, and enforcement of other laws to reduce alcohol-impaired driving
  • Restrictions on alcohol retail density

NIAAA Task Force on College Drinking, (2002),“A Call to Action: Changing the Culture of Drinking at U.S. Colleges.” www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov/

effective practices at the community level 2
EFFECTIVE PRACTICES AT THE COMMUNITY LEVEL 2
  • Increased price and excise taxes on alcoholic beverages
  • Responsible beverage service policies in social and commercial settings
  • Formation of a campus community coalition

NIAAA Task Force on College Drinking, (2002),“A Call to Action: Changing the Culture of Drinking at U.S. Colleges.” www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov/

promising practices
PROMISING PRACTICES
  • Increasing publicity about enforcement of underage drinking laws/eliminating “mixed” messages
  • Provision of “safe rides” programs
  • Regulation of happy hours and sales

NIAAA Task Force on College Drinking, (2002),“A Call to Action: Changing the Culture of Drinking at U.S. Colleges.” www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov/

ineffective practices
INEFFECTIVE PRACTICES
  • Informational, knowledge-based or values clarification interventions when used alone.

NIAAA Task Force on College Drinking, (2002),“A Call to Action: Changing the Culture of Drinking at U.S. Colleges.” www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov/

environmental strategy

ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY

CREATE POLICIES, NORMS AND LAWS WHICH AFFECT ENTIRE GROUPS OF PEOPLE WHERE THEY LIVE, WORK OR PLAY

slide16

Environmental policies make it easier to do what’s safe and healthy and harder to do what’s unsafe and unhealthy

environmental policies
Environmental policies

Keep sending the same messages and thus create new norms

individual vs environmental change change
FOCUS: individual behavior

GOAL: personal control of alcohol

TOOLS: education, treatment, small group activities

WHO: professional & client/patient

Lawrence Wallack et al. Media Advocacy and Public Health: Power for Prevention. Sage Publications, Newbury Park, CA, 1993.

FOCUS: policy, laws, norms

GOAL: community control of alcohol

TOOLS: media and policy advocacy, social pressure

WHO: shared/ community power

INDIVIDUAL VS ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE CHANGE
environmental risk factors of alcohol
ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FACTORS OF ALCOHOL
  • Easy access and availability
  • Low cost and taxes
  • Heavy advertising and promotion
  • Weak laws/Unenforced laws
  • High consumption/abusive drinking norms
  • Pro-alcohol media
easy access availability
Easy Access & Availability
  • Sales to minors
  • High density of outlets (stores, bars)
  • Drive-in & gas station sales, home delivery
  • Unmonitored service (to minors or

intoxicated drinkers, open bars)

  • Long sales hours
strategies to keep alcohol cheap and consumption up
Strategies to Keep Alcohol Cheap and Consumption Up
  • Low taxes
  • Cheap drinks: 2-for-1, all you can drink, discounts, free drink coupons
  • No tax on advertising
  • Shifting costs (e.g., to admission, food) - thus making each additional drink seem cheap or free
alcohol advertising and promotion strategies
Alcohol Advertising and Promotion Strategies
  • Equate alcohol with fun, sex, music, sports, adult glamour
  • Ignore harmful consequences
  • Fail to mention abstinence
  • Focus on individual responsibility
  • Present alcohol as a valued product produced by good citizens
actions to target youth
Actions to Target Youth
  • sponsor sports, music, festivals
  • billboards near schools & recreation
  • novelty items: clothing, sports equipment, promotional items, contests, websites
  • help to lower drinking age
norms that increase risk
Norms That Increase Risk
  • It’s only alcohol, not drugs
  • Drink till you drop
  • Hospitality means lots of drinks
  • Kids have always drunk - look at me
  • Socializing and fun = alcohol
  • It’s all the responsibility of the individual drinker
the alcohol industry uses the mass media to
The alcohol industry uses the mass media to:
  • Promote its products and brands
  • Target current and potential drinkers
  • Gain influence (via advertising $$) to promote itself and its viewpoints
  • Blame youth and individual abusers
  • Downplay its role in politics and alcohol-related problems
pricing controls
PRICING CONTROLS
  • RAISE EXCISE TAXES
  • RESTRICT PRICE PROMOTION
  • RESTRICT DISCOUNTS
  • INCREASE LICENSING FEES
  • INCREASE INFRACTION PENALTIES
  • ELIMINATE TAX EXEMPTION FOR ADVERTISING
access controls general
ACCESS CONTROLS - GENERAL
  • LICENSE OUTLETS WITH SERVER REQUIREMENTS
  • ABC LAWS
  • RESTRICT HOURS, DAYS, LOCATIONS, LOCAL PROHIBITION
  • RESTRICT OUTLET TYPES, NUMBER
  • RESTRICT SERVING PRACTICES
access controls general 2
ACCESS CONTROLS - GENERAL 2
  • REQUIRE SERVER AND RETAILER TRAINING
  • SERVER LIABILITY LEGISLATION:

-FOR SERVERS & RETAILERS

-FOR ADULTS SELLING OR PROVIDING ALCOHOL TO MINORS

  • ELIMINATE SALES/SERVICE AT PUBLIC EVENTS OR LOCATIONS
access controls youth
ACCESS CONTROLS - YOUTH
  • MINIMUM DRINKING AGE
  • GRADUATED LICENSING AND “ZERO TOLERANCE” LEGISLATION
  • SERVER LIABILITY
  • MERCHANT EDUCATION
  • ENFORCEMENT OF SELLING RESTRICTIONS
access and use controls driving
ACCESS AND USE CONTROLS - DRIVING
  • DUI LAWS & ENFORCEMENT
  • OPEN CONTAINER LAWS
  • RESTRICT HOURS OF SERVICE
  • BAN DRIVE-IN, HOME DELIVERY AND GAS STATION SALES
  • INTERLOCK DEVICES
advertising promotion controls
ADVERTISING & PROMOTION CONTROLS
  • CONTROL CONTENT AND MEDIA
  • REDUCE POINT OF SALE MERCHANDISING
  • COUNTER-ADVERTISING
  • REDUCE SPONSORSHIP OF SPORTS AND MUSICAL EVENTS
  • HEALTH WARNING LABELS
advertising and promotion controls 2
ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION CONTROLS 2
  • BAN ADVERTISING IN OR NEAR SCHOOLS AND CAMPUSES
  • SCHOOL BANS ON WEARING OF CLOTHES WITH ADVERTISING
  • EDUCATE COMMUNITY ON COSTS OF ALCOHOL USE AND ABUSE
advertising and promotion controls 3
ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION CONTROLS 3
  • INCREASE TRUTH IN ADVERTISING
  • ADVOCACY, MEDIA EVENTS, EDUCATION ABOUT THE REALITY OF ALCOHOL USE AND PROMOTION
  • CONTROL “IMAGE” PACKAGING AND LABELING
youth are not the primary producers promoters distributors sellers or users of alcohol
Youth are not the primary producers, promoters, distributors, sellers, or users of alcohol
adults and adult businesses are

.............ADULTS AND ADULT BUSINESSES ARE

[adult drinkers / brewers, distillers & wine producers / bars, taverns, restaurants / mass media / advertising / merchants / etc.]

youth can t control
Youth can’t control . . .
  • Alcohol Prices
  • Alcohol Taxes
  • Alcohol Advertising & Promotion
  • Alcohol Sales and Distribution
  • Alcohol Laws & Regulations . . . . . .
  • or, the government,
  • voters or businesses that do control these
priority grid
Priority Grid

High Feasibility

High Impact

Low

Impact

Low

Feasibility

target groups
TARGET GROUPS
  • Whose behavior do you want to change?
  • May be multiple groups
  • What’s the rationale for your choice?
potential target groups
POTENTIAL TARGET GROUPS
  • Policy makers
  • Media
  • General Public
  • Parents
  • Alcohol providers
  • Youth
action plan
ACTION PLAN
  • What is the best way to achieve change?
  • What data do we need?
  • What is the issue?
action plan1
ACTION PLAN
  • Who must be mobilized?
  • What is the message?
  • Who can make the change?
action plan2
ACTION PLAN
  • What needs to be done?
  • Who will take action?
  • When?
elements of environmental prevention model
ELEMENTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL PREVENTION MODEL
  • Data
  • Community Organizing
  • Policy/Strategy Goal
  • Media Advocacy
  • Enforcement
sample scenario 1
SAMPLE SCENARIO 1

MEDIA REPORTS ON

STUDENT DRINKING

AND BAR SPECIALS

PARENTS & OTHER

COMMUNITY MEMBERS

CONTACT

POLICY MAKERS

CITY COUNCIL

ENACTS

ORDINANCE

sample scenario 2
SAMPLE SCENARIO 2

POLICY MAKERS

BAN DRINK

SPECIALS

PRICE OF

DRINKS

INCREASES

YOUTH

DRINK

LESS

VANDALISM

DECREASES

measuring progress
MEASURING PROGRESS
  • Public awareness
  • Media support
  • Policy change
  • Second Hand Effects
  • Drinking behavior
national data sources
NATIONAL DATA SOURCES
  • Monitoring the Future
  • National Survey on Drug Use and Health
  • NIAAA—College Drinking Prevention
  • Harvard School of Public Health, College Alcohol Study
  • SAMHSA—Clearinghouse
local state data sources
LOCAL & STATE DATA SOURCES
  • California Healthy Kids Survey (CHK)
  • ASIPS/GIS mapping
  • Place of Last Drink (POLD)
  • SWITRS—California Highway Patrol
  • Police Department
  • Emergency Medical Services
  • Hospital Discharge Data
slide50

NEXT STEPS

  • What will your next step be?
  • What resources are available?

Free Technical Assistance is available through:

Community Prevention Institute

Phone: (916) 983-8929 • Fax: (916) 983-5738

www.ca-cpi.org

Please see the TA request form in the front pocket of your binder!

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MODULE 8/ Overhead 2/ Page 1