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Welcome. On a sheet of paper, respond to the following question in at least a paragraph. Where were you at this time last year? Describe yourself and how you have changed since last year. (Think deeper than…well, I used to have long hair, but now it’s short.) . Agenda. Syllabus

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welcome

Welcome

On a sheet of paper, respond to the following question in at least a paragraph.

Where were you at this time last year? Describe yourself and how you have changed since last year. (Think deeper than…well, I used to have long hair, but now it’s short.)

agenda
Agenda
  • Syllabus
  • Graduation Project
  • Getting to Know You Activity
  • Student Survey
  • Reflection
graduation project
Graduation Project
  • February 10 - Academic Advisor Form
  • March 10 – Rough Draft to Advisor
  • May 12 – Final Draft
getting to know you
Getting to Know You
  • Think – look over the questions. Pick one or two you want to talk about. Think about how you would answer it.
  • Pair - with someone sitting next to you, discuss the questions you picked and talk about them.
  • Share – with the class
student survey
Student Survey
  • Go to my webpage
  • Click on English III in the left column
  • Click on the survey link
  • Answer the questions completely and honestly
what type of learner are you
What Type of Learner are You?
  • Visual
  • Auditory
  • Read-Write
  • Kinesthetic
slide7

Visual

They tend to be fast talkers.

They exhibit impatience and have a tendency to interrupt.

They use words and phrases that evoke visual images.

They learn by seeing and visualizing.

Auditory

They speak slowly and tend to be natural listeners.

They think in a linear manner.

They prefer to have things explained to them verbally rather than to read written information.

They learn by listening and verbalizing.

Kinesthetic

  • They tend to be slow talkers.
  • They tend to be slow to make decisions.
  • They use all their senses to engage in learning.
  • They learn by doing and solving real-life problems.
  • They like hands-on approaches to things and learn through trial and error.

Read-Write

  • They prefer for information to be displayed in writing, such as lists of ideas.
  • They emphasize text-based input and output.
  • They enjoy reading and writing in all forms.
reflection
Reflection

Where will you be at this time next year? Describe how you think your life will be different. If you don’t think it will be different, explain why.

january 24

January 24

What are your goals for this class this semester?

What is your plan to accomplish these goals?

Who is going to support you?

agenda1
Agenda
  • Grammar Diagnostic
  • Puritans – Historical Background for The Crucible
  • Salem Witch Trials
schoology
Schoology
  • CJRTK-HDHMQ
  • Complete in this order
    • Subject Verb
    • Pronouns
    • Adjectives and Adverbs
    • Fragments
    • Comma Splices
    • Misplaced Modifiers
    • Mechanics
    • Punctuation
puritans
Puritans
  • Go to my webpage
  • Click on English III
  • Download Puritan PowerPoint
  • Read PowerPoint and Complete Guided Notes
january 27

Public Voices, Private LivesMost of us recognize and live with the difference between our public self and our private self. Sometimes, however, those selves – with all their convictions, passions, and values – come into conflict. Then, we must make a choice. Which self will triumph and which self must be sacrificed? Can we find a compromise? These choices are sometimes simply matters of avoiding embarrassment or preventing hurt feelings or confessing dishonesty. Sometimes they are matters of life and death.How do people resolve these conflicts between public and private? What situations challenge their honesty and integrity? How can people slip into hypocrisy or conflicts of interest?

January 27

agenda2
Agenda
  • Memory Test
  • Puritan and Arthur Miller Intro
  • Reading Act I of The Crucible
  • Analyze sentences for meaning using a double entry journal
memory test
Memory Test
  • Scratch Paper
  • One minute to read the words
  • Then, write down as many as you can remember
test 1
Test 1:

Sour NiceCandy

Honey SugarSoda

Bitter Chocolate Good

Heart TasteCake

Tooth TartPie

try again test 2
Try again. Test 2:

Mad Wrath Fear

Happy Hate Fight

Rage Hatred Temper

Mean Fury Calm

Ire Emotion Enrage

results
Results
  • How many of you think you did better on the second test than the first test?
  • Look at your first list. Raise your hand if you wrote down the word sweet.
  • Look at your second list. Raise your hand if you wrote down the word anger or angry.
  • If you raised your hand either time, you have experienced a false memory; those words were not on either list.
  • No correlation between feeling certain about a memory and the accuracy of that memory
talk amongst yourselves
Talk amongst yourselves.
  • How accurate was your memory?
  • Have you ever seen or read anything in the news about false eyewitness testimony or unjust convictions?
  • What do you know about the Salem Witch Trials and Puritan Culture?
  • What do you know (or not know) about McCarthyism?
who was arthur miller
Who was Arthur Miller?
  • American playwright
    • Best known for Death of a Salesman and The Crucible
  • Colorful public life
    • Rocky marriage to Marilyn Monroe
    • American Communist Party
who were the puritans
Who were the Puritans?
  • Sought “purity” in worship – too ceremonial
  • Life should follow scripture
  • Fundamental interpretation of the Bible
  • Life of moderation
  • Predestination
  • Modest and Proper
pg 138
Pg 138

We need readers for…

  • Narrator
  • Parris
  • Tituba
  • Abigail
  • Susanna
  • Mrs. Putnam
  • Putnam
  • Mercy
  • Mary Warren
  • Betty
  • Proctor
  • Giles
january 31

Identifying Puritan Beliefs in Act IWhat Puritan beliefs do you see in the beginning of Act I? Use your book if you need to.What happens in Act I that you can see as a reflection of Puritan society?

January 31

agenda3
Agenda
  • Homework Due: Puritan Notes
  • Continuing reading of Act I of The Crucible
  • Analyze sentences for meaning using a double entry journal
  • Complete Act I study guide to determine what the text says explicitly
double entry journal2
Double Entry Journal
  • What you want to think about
    • Truth/Lies
    • Greed
    • Envy
    • Fear/Tolerance
  • What you should write
    • Questions
    • How you relate
    • Any connection
  • What you can use
    • I really like/dislike
    • I wonder why…
    • I predict that…
    • I think the character should…
    • This reminds me of…
    • This seems to connect to…
    • I think the author is saying…
    • The figurative language in this passage is….and means….
pg 145
Pg 145

We need readers for…

  • Narrator
  • Parris
  • Tituba
  • Abigail
  • Rebecca
  • Mrs. Putnam
  • Putnam
  • Mercy
  • Mary Warren
  • Betty
  • Proctor
  • Giles
  • Hale
february 3

What keeps you in line?A sense of morality probably keeps you from cheating on a test – maybe. In other words, you know cheating is wrong. But there are other reasons for behaving morally. Some people are anxious to please. Others fear the consequences of breaking the rules. Do you think most people today have a strong sense of morality? Why or why not? What have you experienced that has influenced your opinion?

February 3

agenda4
Agenda
  • Finish reading Act I of The Crucible
  • Analyze sentences for meaning using a double entry journal
  • Complete Act I study guide to determine what the text says explicitly
  • View Salem Witch Trial Documentary to compare how authors portray the same event
pg 155
Pg 155

We need readers for…

  • Narrator
  • Hale
  • Parris
  • Rebecca
  • Putnam
  • Mrs. Putnam
  • Giles
  • Proctor
  • Abigail
  • Tituba
  • Betty
salem witch trial
Salem Witch Trial
  • Complete Viewing Guide as you watch
february 4

When is it time to take action?We are faced with decisions every day. Whether it's the winning shot in the final seconds of the game, the right moment to ask someone out, the decision to apply for a job, or ask for a something you want – timing is everything. Our decisions shape our lives. Some decisions have a bigger impact than others. When have you been faced with a big decision? What did you decide? Did you take action or did you leave it to fate? Why?

February 4

agenda5
Agenda
  • Finish viewing of Salem Witch Trial Documentary to compare how authors portray the same event
  • Persuasive Rhetoric Notes
  • Read Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God – pg124
  • Complete Text Analysis of Emotional Appeals and Persuasion
  • Write persuasive speech
  • Homework due Thursday: Complete Act I study guide to determine what the text says explicitly
deductive vs inductive
Deductive vs Inductive
  • Deductive = top-down
    • If the premise is true, the conclusion is true.
    • General to specific
    • All humans will die. I am human. I will die.
  • Inductive = bottom-up
    • Specific to general
    • My wife and her mom are nags. All women are nags.
deductive vs inductive1
Deductive vs. inductive
  • I am having a good year. This is a lucky year.
  • All dogs have a good sense. Spot is a dog. Spot has a good sense of smell.
  • It is dangerous to drive in the snow. It is snowing right now. It is dangerous to drive now.
  • Every 3 year old you know whines. All 3 year olds whine.
persuasive techniques
Persuasive Techniques
  • Ethos: ethical, moral – use values or moral standards
  • Logos: logical – rely on reason and facts
  • Pathos: emotional – elicit strong feelings
  • Examples:
    • How can you look at the sad faces of separated families and not decide to help them.
    • You should consider the immigration argument and decide what is the right thing to do.
    • Statistics show that 1 out of every 6 people in North Carolina has relatives or friends involved in the immigration issue.
rhetorical devices
Rhetorical Devices
  • Analogy – a comparison between two dissimilar things to explain an unfamiliar subject in terms of a familiar one Ex: A gang of boys is like a pack of wolves.
  • Antithesis – the expression of contrasting ideas in parallel grammatical form Ex: Give me liberty, or give me death
  • Repetition – the repeated use of a word or a phrase for emphasis Ex: Let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come!
  • Parallelism – form of repetition in which grammatical pattern is repeated Ex: I have a dream.
  • Rhetorical question – a question to which no answer is expected
  • Allusions – references to figures, events, or places in the Bible
basics of an argument
Basics of an argument
  • Claim – clear statement of a position on an issue
  • Support – reasons and evidence to support claim
  • Counterarguments – statements that anticipate and refute opposing views
  • Logic and Language
  • Conclusion – sums up the reasons or the call for action
pg 124
Pg 124
  • Pay attention to the emotional language Edwards uses to persuade his congregation to believe deeply in a vengeful God
  • How would you describe Edwards’ view of the following?
    • God
    • Christ
    • Humanity
slide42

What is our goal?If you could decide what a goal should be for our entire class, what would you decide and why?

February 6

agenda6
Agenda
  • Vocab Pre-test
  • New Context Vocab
  • Complete Text Analysis of “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” looking at Emotional Appeals and Persuasion
  • Review Answers for
    • Sinners Text Analysis
    • Puritan PowerPoint
    • Salem Witch Trial Viewing Guide
    • Act I Study Guide
  • Write persuasive speech – Due Monday
new vocab
New Vocab
  • Contention
  • Grievances
  • Deference
  • Perpetuation
  • Clamor
  • Predilection
  • Parochial
  • Perverse
  • Innate
  • Repression
  • Calumny
  • Prodigious
  • Diametrically
  • Fanatics
  • Homage
  • Ingratiate
  • Injunctions
  • Inferentially
  • Paradox
  • Corroborate
  • Subservient
  • Proposition
  • Propitiation
  • Licentious
  • Enraptured
slide46

What do you think of Abigail?What would you have said to her if you had been present at the end of Act One?

February 10

agenda7
Agenda
  • Academic Advisor Forms Due Today!
  • Additional Context Vocab – HW Friday
  • Review Text Analysis of “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” looking at Emotional Appeals and Persuasion
  • Present persuasive speech/Analyze presentations
  • Begin Reading Act 2 of The Crucible and continue double entry journal
  • Final Reflection
additional vocab
Additional Vocab
  • indignant
  • placid
  • indignation
  • deferentially
  • incredulous
  • unperturbed
  • deposition
  • trifle
  • pretense
  • solemn
  • calamity
  • partition
  • contention
  • perplexed
  • contemptuous

*HW due Friday: out of all 40 words – choose at least 15 to include in a one-two page analysis of our reading so far. Highlight the vocab words when complete.

analyzing speeches
Analyzing speeches
  • What is the claim?
  • What support does the speaker use?
  • What counterargument does the speaker present?
  • What appeal does the speaker use – ethos, logos, pathos? Explain your answer.
  • What rhetorical devices do you hear –analogy, antithesis, repetition, parallelism, rhetorical question, or allusions?
  • Presentation Style – effective or not?
pg 164
Pg 164

We need readers for:

  • Narrator
  • Elizabeth
  • Proctor
  • Mary Warren
  • Hale
  • Giles
  • Francis
  • Cheever
  • Herrick
double entry journal3
Double Entry Journal
  • What you want to think about
    • Truth/Lies
    • Greed
    • Envy
    • Fear/Tolerance
  • What you should write
    • Questions
    • How you relate
    • Any connection
  • What you can use
    • I really like/dislike
    • I wonder why…
    • I predict that…
    • I think the character should…
    • This reminds me of…
    • This seems to connect to…
    • I think the author is saying…
    • The figurative language in this passage is….and means….
reflection1
Reflection

Based on what we have already read, what do you think will happen next in The Crucible? Why?

february 11

How is the punishment ironic?What happens to those who confess compared to those who claim innocence? What does this suggest about their society? What does it imply about the church and the court?

February 11

agenda8
Agenda
  • Context Vocab – HW Friday
  • Read Act 2 of The Crucible and continue double entry journal
pg 169
Pg 169

We need readers for:

  • Narrator
  • Elizabeth
  • Proctor
  • Mary Warren
  • Hale
  • Giles
  • Francis
  • Cheever
  • Herrick
february 17

February 17

External/Internal Conflicts

Identify at least three external conflicts in the play. Then describe the internal conflict that Proctor faces. How could Proctor’s conflict relate to a broader conflict in the play – between public appearance and private reality?

agenda9
Agenda
  • Remember – Do not show anyone your slip of paper
  • Context Vocab HW DUE Today
  • Topic Proposal, Thesis Statement, and Source Summaries DUE Friday, February 21
  • Review Act II with Study Guide and Double Entry Journal
  • McCarthyism Notes and Speech Reading
  • Present persuasive speech/Evaluate presentations
  • Subject Verb Agreement Notes and Practice
double entry journal4
Double Entry Journal
  • What you want to think about
    • Truth/Lies
    • Greed
    • Envy
    • Fear/Tolerance
  • What you should write
    • Questions
    • How you relate
    • Any connection
  • What you can use
    • I really like/dislike
    • I wonder why…
    • I predict that…
    • I think the character should…
    • This reminds me of…
    • This seems to connect to…
    • I think the author is saying…
    • The figurative language in this passage is….and means….
mccarthy speech
McCarthy Speech
  • If your name is called, take your paper and stand in the back.
hysteria
Hysteria
  • exaggerated or uncontrollable emotion or excitement, esp. among a group of people
  • How does the word “hysteria” fit what was going on in class today?
  • How does it fit what is going on in the play so far?
analyzing speeches1
Analyzing speeches
  • What is the claim?
  • What support does the speaker use?
  • What counterargument does the speaker present?
  • What appeal does the speaker use – ethos, logos, pathos? Explain your answer.
  • What rhetorical devices do you hear –analogy, antithesis, repetition, parallelism, rhetorical question, or allusions?
  • Presentation Style – effective or not?
february 18

February 18

Go ahead and pull up the speech surveys on your phone. We will get started when the bell rings.

agenda10
Agenda
  • Topic Proposal, Thesis Statement, and Source Summaries DUE Friday, February 21
  • Crucible Test Wednesday, February 26
  • Crucible Vocabulary Quiz Friday, February 28
  • Present persuasive speech/Evaluate presentations
  • Subject Verb Agreement Notes and Practice
  • Researching topics and completing source summaries
analyzing speeches2
Analyzing speeches
  • What is the claim?
  • What support does the speaker use?
  • What counterargument does the speaker present?
  • What appeal does the speaker use – ethos, logos, pathos? Explain your answer.
  • What rhetorical devices do you hear –analogy, antithesis, repetition, parallelism, rhetorical question, or allusions?
  • Presentation Style – effective or not?
subject verb agreement
Subject Verb Agreement

1. Subjects joined by and use a plural verb.

  • She and her friends are going to the mall.

2. Singular subjects joined by orornor use a singular verb.

  • The book or the pen is on the desk.

3. When a singular and plural subject are joined by orornor, the verb should agree with the closest subject.

  • The boy or his friends run every day.

4. Do not be misled by a phrase between a subject and verb. Cross it out and make the subject agree with the verb.

  • One of the boxes is open.

5. Each, Each one, either, neither, everyone, everybody, anybody, anyone, somebody, someone, and no one are singular – always – and take a singular verb.

  • Everybody knows Mr. Smith.
subject verb agreement1
Subject Verb Agreement
  • His friends or the boy run/runs every day.
  • The people who listen to that music is/are few.
  • Either is/are correct.
  • Paul and Gary has/have baseball practice.
  • Each one gives/give his all.
  • Elaine or Sophia sings/sing at the home games.
  • The team captain, as well as his players, is/are anxious.
february 19

February 19

Go ahead and pull up the speech surveys on your phone. We will get started when the bell rings.

agenda11
Agenda
  • Topic Proposal, Thesis Statement, and Source Summaries DUE Friday, February 21
  • Crucible Test Wednesday, February 26
  • Crucible Vocabulary Quiz Friday, February 28
  • Present persuasive speech/Evaluate presentations
  • Read Act III The Crucible pg 180
  • Act III Study Guide and Double Entry Journal
  • Subject Verb Agreement Notes and Practice
analyzing speeches3
Analyzing speeches
  • What is the claim?
  • What support does the speaker use?
  • What counterargument does the speaker present?
  • What appeal does the speaker use – ethos, logos, pathos? Explain your answer.
  • What rhetorical devices do you hear –analogy, antithesis, repetition, parallelism, rhetorical question, or allusions?
  • Presentation Style – effective or not?
pg 180 readers
Pg 180 Readers
  • Narrator
  • Hathorne
  • Martha
  • Giles
  • Danforth
  • Herrick
  • Hale
  • Parris
  • Herrick
  • Francis
  • Proctor
  • Mary Warren
  • Cheever
  • Putnam
  • Abigail
  • Mercy Lewis
double entry journal5
Double Entry Journal
  • What you want to think about
    • Truth/Lies
    • Greed
    • Envy
    • Fear/Tolerance
  • What you should write
    • Questions
    • How you relate
    • Any connection
  • What you can use
    • I really like/dislike
    • I wonder why…
    • I predict that…
    • I think the character should…
    • This reminds me of…
    • This seems to connect to…
    • I think the author is saying…
    • The figurative language in this passage is….and means….
subject verb agreement2
Subject Verb Agreement
  • Nouns such as civics, mathematics, dollars*, measles, and news use singular verbs.
    • The news is on at six.
    • Five dollars is a lot of money.
  • Nouns such as scissors, tweezers, and shears use plural verbs.
    • The scissors are dull.
subject verb agreement3
Subject Verb Agreement

3. Sentences beginning with there is or there are, the subject follows the verb.

a. There are many questions.

b. There is a question.

4. Collective nouns are words that imply more than one person but are considered singular and take a singular verb – group, team, committee, class, and family.

a. The team travels on Friday.

b. The committee decides what to purchase.

subject verb agreement4
Subject Verb Agreement

5. Expressions such as with, together with, including, accompanied by, in addition to, or as well do not change the number of the subject.

a. The President, accompanied by his wife, is traveling to India.

b. All of the books, including yours, are in that box.

february 20

February 20

Go ahead and pull up the speech surveys on your phone. We will get started when the bell rings.

agenda12
Agenda
  • Topic Proposal, Thesis Statement, and Source Summaries DUE TOMORROW
  • Crucible Test Wednesday, February 26
  • Crucible Vocabulary Quiz Friday, February 28
  • Present persuasive speech/Evaluate presentations
  • Continue Reading Act III The Crucible pg 190
  • Act III Study Guide and Double Entry Journal
  • Subject Verb Agreement Notes and Practice
analyzing speeches4
Analyzing speeches
  • What is the claim?
  • What support does the speaker use?
  • What counterargument does the speaker present?
  • What appeal does the speaker use – ethos, logos, pathos? Explain your answer.
  • What rhetorical devices do you hear –analogy, antithesis, repetition, parallelism, rhetorical question, or allusions?
  • Presentation Style – effective or not?
pg 190 readers
Pg 190 Readers
  • Narrator
  • Hathorne
  • Giles
  • Danforth
  • Hale
  • Parris
  • Proctor
  • Francis
  • Mary Warren
  • Cheever
  • Abigail
  • Mercy Lewis
  • Susanna Walcott
  • Elizabeth
double entry journal6
Double Entry Journal
  • What you want to think about
    • Truth/Lies
    • Greed
    • Envy
    • Fear/Tolerance
  • What you should write
    • Questions
    • How you relate
    • Any connection
  • What you can use
    • I really like/dislike
    • I wonder why…
    • I predict that…
    • I think the character should…
    • This reminds me of…
    • This seems to connect to…
    • I think the author is saying…
    • The figurative language in this passage is….and means….
subject verb agreement practice
Subject Verb Agreement Practice
  • The class is/are reading The Crucible.
  • Seven dollars is/are sitting on the table.
  • Saturday, in addition to Sunday, is/are my favorite day of the week.
  • Civics requires/require a prerequisite.
  • There is/are many students working in the media center.
  • The tweezers is/are sharp.
reflection online
Reflection - online

In sports, in politics, and in war, people demonize their opponents – that is, they portray their enemies as incarnations of evil. Can you think of examples? Why do you think people do this? What effect do you think such behavior has on society?