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Writing Measurable IEP Goals. Presented By: IEP Managers NYC DOE Integrated Service Centers December 2, 2009. 1. The IEP Managers. Staten Island ISC Janet Blit: jblit@schools.nyc.gov Brooklyn ISC Nick Chavarria: nchavar@schools.nyc.gov

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slide1

Writing

Measurable IEP Goals

Presented By:

IEP Managers

NYC DOE

Integrated Service Centers

December 2, 2009

1

slide2

The IEP Managers

Staten Island ISC Janet Blit: jblit@schools.nyc.gov

Brooklyn ISC Nick Chavarria: nchavar@schools.nyc.gov

Manhattan ISC Madeline Rochelle: mrochel@schools.nyc.gov

Queens ISC Tanya Smith: tsmith18@schools.nyc.gov

topics
Topics

3

  • Introduction
  • Educational Benefit
  • Present Levels of Performance
    • The Components
    • Expectations
    • Psychologist Connection
  • Smart Goals
    • Components of SMART Goals
    • Sample SMART Goals
  • IV. Appendix
    • Sample Goals
audience poll 1
Audience Poll #1
  • Who is in the audience?
  • Principal or Assistant Principal
  • Teacher
  • School Psychologist
  • Related Service Provider
  • IEP Teacher or Coordinator
  • Other
slide7
Determine if there is a clear relationshipamong:

Present levels of performance

Identified needs

Annual goals

Transition

Short term objectives (required only for Pre-K & Alternate Assessment Students)

Progress reports

Accommodations/modifications

Recommended services

THE IEP:DOES IT ALL CONNECT?

Is there a clear connection of the student’s transition needs throughout the IEP?

7

slide8

Summary of Educational Benefitreflects on the quality of IEP development to increase student access, participation, and progress in the general education curriculum

The intent of a “Free Appropriate Public Education” (FAPE) for students with disabilities is: to design individualized instruction with sufficient supports and services to enable the student to receive educational benefit.

What is Educational Benefit?

Determining if there is a clearrelationship between: the identified needs/present levels of performance, annual goals, accommodations/modifications & services/placement

(DOES IT ALL CONNECT?)

Have changes to annual goals, services/placement been made based on the results of the student’s progress?

(HAS THE IEP BEEN WRITTEN/MODIFIED TO MEET THE STUDENT’S CURRENT NEEDS?)

Information on the student’s IEP: strengths, needs, annual goals, accommodations & modifications, services/placement & progress compared – looking for patternsover the past 3 years

(DOES THE IEP GIVE A CLEAR PICTURE OF THE STUDENT’S PROGRESS THROUGH THE YEARS?)

The Purpose of the Educational Benefit Review Process is:

to determine whether the design of the IEP was *reasonably calculated for the student to receive educational benefit.

* Reasonable Calculationevaluates if the IEP reflects on the student’s present levels of performance, goals, supports & maximize access, participation & progress in the general

education curriculum

8

Staten Island Integrated Service Center (ISC)

slide13
Present Levels of Performance

IEP Pages 3, 4 and 5

13

13

slide14

AUDIENCE POLL #2

All needs/concerns noted in the Present Levels of Performance for students who participate in Standardized assessment should be addressed in

The FBA

b) The BIP

c) Annual Goals

d) Short Term Objectives

slide15

Writing Present Levels of Performance

It cannot be overstated that the overall quality of an IEP rests

firmly on the foundation of the Present Levels of Performance.

iep development the iep as an individualized long term lesson plan
IEP DevelopmentThe IEP as an individualized long-term lesson plan

Present Level of Performance (PLOP)

Annual goals

Plan and deliver instruction

Measure progress (on-going assessment)

key questions for present level of performance
Key Questions for Present Level of Performance

Strengths, Affinities?

Needs? Learning styles?

Preferences, Interests?

Parent/Student concerns?

Special Considerations?

Progress in the past year?

Student Performance compared to standards?

Response to Intervention?

What has worked? What hasn’t?

Transition – Post high school plans? (age 14 and up)

slide18

Audience Poll #3

Which of these items does NOT belong in the Present Levels of Performance?:

Parent Concerns

Student Interests

Student Strengths

Student Needs

Holiday Wish List

18

present levels of performance
Present Levels of Performance
  • Student Present Levels of Performance are documented on pages 3, 4 and 5 of the IEP, and are directly connected to the annual goals.
  • Annual goals are developed to address the individual student’s needs from the present levels of performance.
  • There must be a direct relationship between the annual goals and the present levels of performance.
  • Annual goals are statements, which emanate from the present levels of performance.
present levels of performance20
Present Levels of Performance
  • Present Levels of Performance must specifically describe and reflect the students’ learning, social, health and developmental characteristics as identified by the IEP Team.
  • It is also important to document student strengths and interests in the present levels of performance.
    • Strengths can be leveraged to enhance the learning experience.
    • Level I Vocational Assessments describe student interests. This becomes extremely important when addressing Transition in the IEP.
    • Students’ preferences can guide teaching strategies; e.g.
      • Large group vs. small group, learning style, etc.
    • Parental and student input must be reflected in order to give a more complete description of the student.
present levels of performance21
Present Levels of Performance
  • Details, details …
  • When documenting Present Levels of Performance a detailed description of the student’s learning, social and developmental characteristics is required in order to ensure that the annual goals, in turn, will truly address student needs;
  • e.g. Carla is reading far below grade level. (No detail)
  • e.g. Carla demonstrates an inability to consistently remember symbol to sound relationships. This prevents her from being able to successfully sound out words. (Details!)
present levels of performance23
Present Levels of Performance
  • Page 3-Academic Performance and Learning Characteristics
  • Describing students’ needs and learning styles
  • Meaningful, measurable and observable annual goals must emanate from the student’s Present Levels of Performance. A clear picture of students’ needs, which are connected to:
  • the disability, and
  • the preferred learning style
  • … is necessary in order to know what areas need to be addressed when writing annual goals.
present levels of performance24
Present Levels of Performance
  • Page 3-Academic Performance and Learning Characteristics
  • Detailed descriptions of students include information relating to progress made since the previous IEP was written, as well as their performance compared to standards.
  • The IEP must document student growth from one year to the next.
  • Formal assessments, class tests, as well as teacher and provider observations give information on how the student is performing in comparison to the standards.
  • Again, details are important:
  • Suzanne has made progress since last year. (No detail)
  • Since last year, Suzanne has increased her decoding skills. Currently, she is able to decode multi-syllable words containing closed and open syllables. (Detail!)
present levels of performance25
Present Levels of Performance
  • Page 4 Social-Emotional Performance
  • Individual students may have unique traits that affect their learning process; e.g.
  • a student with behavioral challenges
  • a student who takes medication
  • Detailed documentation of these traits on IEP pages 4 will give teachers better insight into the student’s individual social–emotional performance.
  • Maria is disruptive. (No detail)
  • When Maria is confronted by challenging assignments she often reacts by talking loudly, leaving her desk and refusing to complete the assignment. (Detail!)
present levels of performance26
Present Levels of Performance
  • Page 5 Health and Physical Development
  • When students are to receive services such as Adaptive Physical Education, Occupational or Physical Therapy, there needs to be a description of the attributes that require those services on page 5.
  • Example: When a student receives Occupational Therapy, a statement such as,
  • (Student) demonstrates (condition/characterized by:)that prevents him/her from (identify the affected learning activity).
  • Example:
  • Jim demonstrates poor fine motor control that interferes with his general handwriting ability, and he has difficulty producing legible written work.
the psychologist connection
The Psychologist Connection
  • For School Psychologists: How to make the connection between clinical findings, gathered during a private, one-on-one session, and the classroom?
  • There must be connections among clinical findings and how:
  • Strengths, affinities and weaknesses may manifest in class
  • Cognitive attributes connect to management strategies and annual goals
  • Achievement findings connect to classroom performance and annual goals
  • How what was seen in the testing situation may manifest during class performance
  • The objectives are to make annual goals achievable and relevant for students, and to see improvements in test results, homework and the behaviors that heighten responsiveness.
  • The collaboration between clinician and teacher is essential in order to develop the connections mentioned above.
the psychologist connection29
The Psychologist Connection
  • For School Psychologists: How to communicate the clinical findings in language that can be understood and implemented by parents and teachers?
  • The best practice is to eliminate psychological jargon from the Present Levels of Performance.
  • Also, be careful with terms such as “grade level”. It is more meaningful, instructionally, when the student’s skills are described in light of what will manifest in class.
  • (Student’s) math skills are on a third grade level.
  • Although (Student) can add and subtract whole numbers up to three-digits, with regrouping, multiply two-digit numbers by two-digit numbers, due to weakness in active working memory s/he cannot retain information necessary for carrying out the sequential steps of the long division process.
the psychologist connection30
The Psychologist Connection
  • For School Psychologists: How to communicate the clinical findings in language that can be understood and implemented by parents and teachers?
  • Psychological terms have relevance within the context of a psychoeducational report. The terms familiar to only school psychologists are not necessarily appropriate within the context of the Present Levels of Performance in an IEP.
  • When Reporting about cognitive functions such as memory, attention, visual or auditory processing, spatial or temporal awareness or executive functioning skills the question becomes:
  • How might the affected skill set manifest in the classroom? For example:
  • “On the Digit Span and Letter-Number Sequencing subtests, (student) demonstrated delays in short-term memory”, might not have a lot of meaning for a teacher.
  • Better to describe: How a short-term memory delay might affect learning in the classroom.
  • The collaboration between clinician and teacher is essential in order to develop the connections mentioned above.
slide31

AUDIENCE POLL #4

  • Why should IEP Writers use S.M.A.R.T. Goals?
  • Because there are no longer short term objectives to fully explain the parameters of the goal and set the standard for achievement
  • Because if the IEP is not lengthy, it looks like we’re not doing enough
  • Because teachers and providers like to use lots of paper and ink
annual goal activity
Enjoy

Spell orally

List in writing

Know

Walk

Understand

Illustrate

Grasp the meaning of

Point to

Read orally

Write a paragraph

Remember

Realize

Circle

Be familiar with

Count blocks

Categorize

Annual Goal Activity

Measurable & observable?.... Or Not?

Placenext to measurable & observable examples

andXnext to non measurable & non observable examples.

Will you know it when you see it?

writing meaningful iep annual goals
Writing Meaningful IEP Annual Goals
  • We can’t measure what we cannot sense (see, hear, smell, feel, taste).
  • Out with the old!
    • Annual goal: (Student) will display improved social skills.
      • What does that look like?
  • What is it you want to see?
    • Annual goals must be observable as well as measurable.
  • Identify a behavior.
    • Describe a concrete behavior or skill set that the student will exhibit.
audience poll 5
Audience Poll #5
  • Elements of Annual Goals need to incorporate all except
  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Artistic
  • Achievable
  • Relevant
  • Time-Related
according to the sopm
According to the SOPM:
  • Short-term objectives are no longer required for students who participate in City and State-wide testing.
    • IEPs will now have Annual Goals only
    • Only pre-school students and students who participate in New York State Alternate Assessment (NYSAA) will require short-term objectives
  • Annual Goals must be directly related to the Present Levels of Performance
  • Annual Goals must be measurable and observable
s m a r t annual goals
S.M.A.R.T Annual Goals
  • Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. The main purpose is to ensure that all 5 elements are included in each annual goal.
  • S– Specific: Describe what the student will do one year from now that s/he cannot do today.
  • M – Measurable: Describe the criteria that will be used to measure successful achievement of the goal.
  • A – Achievable: Based on the student’s current level of performance, what is a reasonable and attainable higher level of performance that the student will achieve within one year?
  • (What will you see happening a year from now that you don’t see happening at the present time, and what can the student reasonably be expected to be able to do in one year?)
  • R – Relevant: Does the annual goal reflect individual needs identified in the Present Levels of Performance? How does the annual goal relate to the student’s classroom performance?
  • (Annual goals emanate from the present levels of performance and must have a direct relationship with classroom performance).
  • T – Time Related: Describe how long the goal will take to achieve, and embed the evaluation schedule
decoding student lacks automaticity in decoding words reducing comprehension of text
Decoding: Student lacks automaticity in decoding words, reducing comprehension of text.
  • Example: To address one possible deficit in decoding
  • Paul can decode initial consonants in single-syllable words but lacks knowledge of short vowel sounds. He has difficulty blending sounds to read words.
  • S – Specific, M– Measurable, A – Achievable, R– Relevant, T– Time Related
  • Annual Goal:
  • In one year, givenstrategies such as VAKT (visual/auditory/kinesthetic/tactile)association, Paul will fluently decode syllable types:closed, open, vowel-consonant-e, r-controlled, consonant-le and vowel teams*, in controlled textwith 90% accuracy as measured in five consecutive trialsovera two-week period, as measured by (Whom?).
  • Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. This is only one example to ensure that all 5 elements are included in the annual goal.
slide40
Processing control: (Student) lacks ability to determine relevance in order to retain information that is central to reading comprehension
  • Example: To address one possible deficit in reading comprehension
  • Sarah has difficulty picking out the main idea from reading passages. She is unable to isolate supporting details to help her understand the text, and she is unable to correctly answer reading comprehension questions.
  • Annual  Goal:
  • In one year, given strategies such as: outlines to help focus on important information, reading guided questions before reading the text, summarizing and paraphrasing during reading, previewing vocabulary and important concepts, prioritizing specific information, Sarah will correctly answer nine out of ten* comprehension questions on reading passages as measured by (Whom?) on five consecutive weekly assessments.
  • * According to what is consistent with the student’s current level.
organization
Organization
  • Example: To address one possible deficit in organization skills
  • Daquon lacks ability to organize academic materials for classes and homework. He appears unable to keep track of due dates, class and homework assignments, tests and projects. He loses papers easily and arrives in class and at home without the materials and directions necessary to complete assignments.
  • Annual Goal:
  • In one year, given explicit sequential instruction in organizational strategies such as using an assignment pad, calendar, checklist system and color-coded folders, Daquon will independently keep track of and complete weekly assignments as measured by (Whom?) over five consecutive weeks with 100% accuracy.
slide43
Writing: Language processing deficits interfere with the Student’s ability to produce written compositions
  • Example: To address one possible deficit in written expressive language
  • Indira has difficulty writing complete sentences, using proper grammar and punctuation. She appears unable to organize ideas to produce expository writing that effectively communicates ideas. She has difficulty with consistently using transition words such as because, although, but, so and therefore to expand sentences to express her ideas.
  • S – Specific, M– Measurable, A – Achievable, R– Relevant, T– Time Related
  • Annual Goal:
  • In one year, given explicit sequential instruction in expanding sentences to include transition words such as because, although, but, so and therefore, Indira will write complex sentencesusing sentence starters on nine of ten examples as measured by (Whom)? in five assessments over a two -weekperiod.
auditory comprehension cohesion student has difficulty taking notes from orally presented material
Auditory Comprehension/Cohesion: Student has difficulty taking notes from orally-presented material.
  • Example: To address one possible deficit in auditory processing
  • Jack has difficulty taking notes in class due to slow processing of information delivered orally. This prevents him from gathering enough information to successfully complete assignments.
  • Annual Goal:
  • In one year, given strategies to improve auditory cohesion, such as picking key words out of sentences and selected key concepts from orally-presented paragraphs, summarizing exercises and comparison of note-taking efforts with prepared notes, and using color-coding and graphic organizers to guide note-taking, Jack will take appropriate notes on an orally-presented narrative to include characters, time/locale, main issue and outcome, as measured by (Whom?) with 90%* completeness of notes on five consecutive weekly note-taking assessments.
  • * According to what is consistent with the student’s current level.
behavior coping skills
Behavior: Coping skills
  • Yasmin has difficulty negotiating situations in which she is in conflict with her peers. Her inability to establish appropriate boundaries, and to respect the boundaries of others causes her to get into frequent verbal disputes with peers. She uses offensive and threatening language during her disputes.
  • S – Specific, M– Measurable, A – Achievable, R– Relevant, T– Time Related
  • Goal:Within one year, given explicit instruction in conflict resolution strategies and the opportunity to role-play in counseling sessions,Yasmin will state verbally to a peer when she feels that she has been disrespected or her personal space has been invaded, using appropriate, inoffensive words, in 4 out of 5 situations as assessed both in class and in unstructured settings by any of her teachers and/or guidance counselor over two consecutive weeksthrough direct observations.
math the language of math to address one possible deficit in math processing
Math: the Language of MathTo address one possible deficit in math processing

James has difficulty with recognizing numbers/digits, operational signs, place value, fractions, squares, roots and the general language of math. He has some directional confusion, and he inappropriately inserts or omits digits, words and signs. He sometimes interchanges similar digits inappropriately. These difficulties interfere with his ability to solve word problems in math.

Goal: In one year, given VAKT (visual/auditory/tactile/kinesthetic) strategies to improve directional confusion and concept understanding, sequentially increasing language complexity, graphic organizers that sort a) known information, b) unneeded information, c) what the problem asks and d) strategies to solve the problem, rubrics for checking and rechecking, James will solve math word problems with two embedded operations with 90% accuracy on five consecutive weekly quizzes.

slide48
TransitionAll annual goals on a Transition IEP should be focused on working toward the student’s post secondary work, school or training.
  • Ginny wants to work as a secretary in a law firm. She needs to develop office skills, such as knowledge of word-processing software and keyboarding.
  • Goal: In one year, given opportunity to learn and practice regularly with typing-teaching software and a word processing program, Ginny will type text with appropriate formatting of formal business letters at 20 words per minute, as measured by 3 timed trials in a two-week period.
  • Note: Academic goals should also point toward skills and achievement toward the student’s career choice.
slide50

For Assistance & SupportYour IEP Managers to the rescue….Staten Island ISCJanet Blit: jblit@schools.nyc.govBrooklyn ISC Nick Chavarria: nchavar@schools.nyc.govManhattan ISC Madeline Rochelle: mrochel@schools.nyc.govQueens ISC Tanya Smith: tsmith18@schools.nyc.govSOPM: http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres/5F3A5562-563C-4870-871F BB9156EEE60B/0/03062009SOPM.pdfSOPM Forms: http://intranet.nycboe.net/TeachingLearning/SpecialEducation/SOPMLetters/default.htm

IEP HELP SQUAD

slide51
APPENDIX
  • Sample Annual Goals
slide52

READING COMPREHENSIONStudent does not comprehend written text.Attention-lacks sufficient mental energy to read lengthy paragraphs. He currently demonstrates comprehension of passages of no longer than one paragraph.Goal: In one year, given strategies such as previewing organizers, previewing passages, chunking of passages, frequent comprehension checks, “jumpstarting” by adult reading first part of text to student and use of motivational topic texts, student will correctly answer comprehension questions on passages of at least five paragraphs in length with 90% accuracy on five consecutive weekly assessments.Processing control: lacks ability to determine relevance in order to retain information that is central to comprehensionGoal: In one year, given strategies such as: outlines to help focus on important information, reading guided questions before reading the text, summarizing and paraphrasing during reading, previewing vocabulary and important concepts, prioritizing specific information student will correctly answer nine out of ten comprehension questions on reading passages on five consecutive weekly assessments.

slide53

READING COMPREHENSION , continuedProduction Control: lacks ability to preview, self-monitor and pace. Student is unable to make connections between text and prior knowledge. Short-term memory problems are also a factor.Goal: In one year, given strategies such as guiding questions, self-questioning techniques (i.e. “Does this make sense? This is similar to…. This reminds me of….”), post-it notes to record main idea, predict passage elements and evaluate predictions and graphic organizers student will correctly answer comprehension questions on five consecutive weekly assessments with 90% accuracy.Active working memory: Student lacks ability to hold what she has read in her mind e.g., she forgets the beginning of a passage by the time she gets to the end.Goal: In one year, given strategies such as creating semantic maps to organize and consolidate idea, drawing sequence pictures, highlighting/underlining as she reads, associating pictures with text, taking notes, verbal paraphrasing and summarizing, student will correctly answer comprehension questions on five consecutive weekly assessments with 90% accuracy.

slide54

READING COMPREHENSION , continued

Higher Order Cognition: Student is unable to make inferences, compare concepts and think critically and analyticallyGoal: In one year, given strategies such as modeling of thought processes, use of brainstorming and comparing and contrasting, and specific teaching of visualization and questioning techniques, student will respond to reading passages by answering inferential questions (i.e. compare/contrast, identify main ideas and supporting details, distinguish fact from opinion, predict, draw conlusions) with justification with 80% accuracy on five consecutive weekly assessments. Vocabulary Development: Student demonstrates poor vocabulary development which affects ability to understand reading passages.Goal: In one year, given strategies such as classifying activities, concept maps, Venn diagrams, explicit instruction in prefixes, suffixes, root words, synonyms, homonyms and antonyms to specifically teach vocabulary, student will demonstrate understanding of target vocabulary by achieving 90% correct on five consecutive weekly vocabulary quizzes.

slide55
DECODING
  • Student lacks automaticity in decoding words, reducing comprehension of text.
  • Goal: In one year, given strategies such as VAKT (visual/auditory/kinesthetic/tactile association, student [will associate specific letters (all consonants and short vowels) and sounds and blend those letter sounds to fluently read CVC words in controlled text] with 90% accuracy in five consecutive trials over a two-week period.
  • Goal: In one year, given strategies such as (VAKT ) visual/auditory/kinesthetic/tactile association, student will fluently decode syllable types: closed, open, vowel-consonant-e, r-controlled, consonant-le, vowel teams, in controlled text with 90% accuracy in five consecutive trials over a two-week period.
  • Goal: In one year, given strategies such as flash cards, multiple repetitions, choral chanting, music/rhythm student will read target sight words with 90% accuracy in five consecutive trials over a two-week period.
slide56
ORGANIZATION
  • Student lacks ability to organize academic materials for classes and homework. He appears unable to keep track of due dates, class and homework assignments, tests and projects. He loses papers easily and arrives in class and at home without the materials and directions necessary to complete assignments.
  • Goal: In one year, given explicit sequential instruction in organizational strategies such as using an assignment pad, calendar, checklist system and color-coded folders, student will independently keep track of and complete weekly assignments as measured over five consecutive weeks with 100% accuracy.
  • WRITING
  • Language processing deficits interfere with the student’s ability to produce written compositions with complete sentences, proper grammar and proper punctuation. He appears unable to organize ideas to produce expository writing that effectively communicates ideas. He has difficulty with consistency in using future (will ___) , present (-s, -es) and simple past tense (-ed) indicators with regular verbs.
  • Goal: In one year, given explicit sequential instruction and subject-verb agreement activities, a rubric and repeated practice with number (is/are), and using a paragraph frame, student will write a paragraph containing sentences using correct subject-verb agreement (including common irregular verbs) as assessed by achievement of 90% accuracy in ten consecutive writing assignments.
slide57
WRITING, continued
  • Goal: In one year, given explicit sequential instruction in expanding sentences to include transition words such as because, although, but, so and therefore, student will write complex sentences using sentence starters on nine of ten examples in five assessments over a two -week period.
  • Goal: In one year, given explicit sequential instruction in expanding sentences and activities such as expanding simple sentences by answering individual question words and using pictures, student will identify words in an expanded sentence that tell who, what, where, when, why and how (ex: Yesterday, Sally ran quicklyto the school. when, how, where) as measured by 90% accuracy on five consecutive trials over a two-week period.
  • Goal: In one year, given explicit sequential instruction in use of future (will ___) , present (-s, -es) and simple past tense (-ed) indicators with regular verbs in sentences and use of visual aids such as a paragraph frame, picture cues and highlighting, student will write a six-sentence paragraph using matching tense markers as measured by 90% accuracy on five consecutive assessments over a two-week period.
  • Goal: In one year, given explicit sequential instruction in constructing an organized paragraph, use of visual aids and a specific paragraph frame and color-coding, student will write a paragraph, consisting of a topic sentence, 3 supporting statements and a summarizing sentence as measured by 90% accuracy on five consecutive paragraph assignments over a two-week period.
slide58
VISUAL PROCESSING, continued
  • Visual Memory and Visual Sequential Memory:Student cannot copy from a board or book accurately. Student cannot remember math facts/equations. She has poor memory for sight words. Slow processing of visual stimulus. She has difficulty with pairing sounds and written symbols (letters). She has difficulty with remembering words, pictures, symbols, forms, numbers, equations and their orientation when they are removed from sight.
  • Goal: In one year, given visual sequencing games and “what is different?” exercises with tactile/kinesthetic and auditory cues, visualizing strategies, “air writing” and concentration games to improve visual sequence memory, student will correctly order the elements (picture/text) of an eight-element narrative from memory when the correct model is removed from sight, as measured by 90% accuracy in 10 consecutive trials over a two-week period.
  • Goal: In one year, given visual sequencing games and “what is different?” exercises with tactile/kinesthetic and auditory cues, including math songs, visualizing strategies, “air writing” and concentration games to improve visual sequence memory, student will correctly write multiplication tables as measured by 90% accuracy in 5 consecutive weekly quizzes.
slide59
VISUAL PROCESSING, continued
  • Goal: In one year, given visual sequencing games and “what is different?” exercises with tactile/kinesthetic and auditory cues, visualizing strategies, “air writing” and concentration games to improve visual sequence memory, student will correctly draw sequences of geometric shapes and target equations with correct orientation from memory when visual model is removed from sight, as measured by 90% accuracy in 5 consecutive weekly quizzes.
  • AUDITORY PROCESSING
  • Auditory Memory: Student has difficulty retrieving letters, words and numbers. He has difficulty retrieving his address and phone number. He fails to recognize the sound-symbol relationship because he cannot remember the sounds . He cannot follow multi-step oral directions.
  • Goal: In one year, given VAKT (visual/auditory/tactile/kinesthetic) strategies, auditory memory games with in- and out-of-category memory sequences and focused listening exercises with frequent practice, student will correctly follow three-step oral directions with 90% accuracy over 10 consecutive trials within a two week period.
slide60
AUDITORY PROCESSING, continued
  • Goal: In one year, given VAKT (visual/auditory/tactile/kinesthetic) strategies, auditory memory games and focused listening exercises with frequent practice, student will correctly produce the letter sounds of the consonants and short vowels with 90% accuracy over 10 consecutive trials within a two week period.
  • Goal: In one year, given VAKT (visual/auditory/tactile/kinesthetic) strategies, auditory memory games and focused listening exercises with frequent practice, including number songs and other musical strategies, student will correctly recite multiplication tables with 100% accuracy over 10 consecutive trials within a two week period.
  • Auditory Discrimination: Student cannot recognize same/different in sounds in words orally presented in initial, medial, or final positions in words, inhibiting his ability to manipulate phonemes to create new words.
  • Goal: In one year, given VAKT (visual/auditory/tactile/kinesthetic) strategies, recognition of rhyming, and focused listening exercises, including different colored tokens to represent phoneme sounds, to identify same/different in sounds, beginning with sounds in isolation, then syllables and words, with frequent practice, student will correctly manipulate phonemes in all positions in CVC words to create new words with 90% accuracy over 10 consecutive trials within a two week period.
slide61
AUDITORY PROCESSING, continued
  • Auditory Comprehension/Cohesion: Student has difficulty taking notes from orally-presented material.
  • Goal: In one year, given strategies to improve auditory cohesion, such as drawing pictures to illustrate orally-presented material, picking key words out of sentences and selected key concepts from orally-presented paragraphs, summarizing exercises and comparison of note-taking efforts with prepared notes, and using color-coding and graphic organizers to guide note-taking, student will take appropriate notes on an orally-presented narrative to include characters, time/ locale, main issue and outcome, as measured by 90% completeness of notes on five consecutive weekly note-taking assessments.
  • MATH: DYSCALCULIA
  • Student lacks development in critical factors that affect math meaning. These factors include ability to connect a new concept with prior experience, ability to form models or examples from concrete material and to illustrate that model in a drawing, use of number symbols, operational signs, formula and equations, concept application to word problems and ability to communicate the processes used, as if in teaching the concept to others.
  • Verbal Dyscalculia: Student has difficulty retrieving and naming math symbols, math terms, operations and associating numbers to amounts of things. He has difficulty naming amounts of objects. He has difficulty writing numbers when they are presented orally.
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MATH: DYSCALCULIA, continued
  • Goal: In one year, using (visual/auditory/tactile/kinesthetic) strategies for explicit sequential teaching of discrete steps, color coding, mnemonic devices, manipulatives, and math games such as War and Concentration, and with frequent practice, student will perform calculations using the appropriate operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) with triple digit numbers with 80% accuracy on five consecutive weekly quizzes.
  • Practical Skills Dyscalculia: Student has difficulty in visualizing math concepts. He has difficulty manipulating items in math tasks and with adding comparing and estimating pictured objects. He has difficulty with rote counting. He does not understand part/whole relationships, spatial details, shapes and size.
  • Goal: In one year, using (visual/auditory/tactile/kinesthetic) strategies for explicit teaching of practical skills, including color coding, number frames and other spatial graphic organizers, counting drills, rhythmic activities and songs, student will match pictured objects with correct numbers and use manipulatives to perform written addition and subtraction with 90% accuracy in ten assessments over a two-week period.
  • Goal: In one year, using (visual/auditory/tactile/kinesthetic) strategies for explicit teaching of practical skills, sorting tasks, use of color coding, number frames and other spatial graphic organizers, counting drills, rhythmic activities and songs, student will describe comparative attributes of size, shape, and part/whole relationship regarding pairs of objects and pictures with 90% accuracy in ten consecutive assessments over a two-week period.
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MATH: DYSCALCULIA, continued

Lexical Dyscalculia: Student has difficulty with recognizing numbers/digits, operational signs, place value, fractions, squares, roots and the general language of math. He has some directional confusion, and he inappropriately inserts or omits digits, words and signs. He sometimes interchanges similar digits inappropriately. These difficulties interfere with his ability to solve word problems in math.

Goal: In one year, given VAKT (visual/auditory/tactile/kinesthetic) strategies to improve directional confusion and concept understanding, sequentially increasing language complexity, graphic organizers that sort a) known information, b) unneeded information, c) what the problem asks and d) strategies to solve the problem, rubrics for checking and rechecking, student will solve math word problems with two embedded operations with 90% accuracy on five consecutive weekly quizzes.

SOCIAL –EMOTIONAL

Student often presents as withdrawn, especially in unstructured settings (lunch room, schoolyard). She rarely initiates conversations with peers. She tends to not seek out the company of others. Her ability to participate in classroom group activities is affected by her reluctance to initiate conversation.

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SOCIAL –EMOTIONAL, continued

Goal: In one year, in the lunch room, the schoolyard and during group activities in the classroom, given appropriate phrases for initiating conversation and a sequenced set of specific strategies for maintaining verbal exchange and reducing communicative stress, student will start conversations with two classmates per day, as measured by the guidance counselor and/or classroom teacher, during a two-week period.

Student demonstrates understanding of material presented in class, but he does not volunteer to participate in class, due to poor self-image and resulting lack of confidence. Additionally, he tends to respond, “I don’t know” when called upon to contribute to class discussions.

Goal: In one year, given a cueing system, frequent practice and a gradually diminishing system of supports, such as prior notification by teachers as to what he will respond to in class (a preparatory set, provided privately), student will verbally participate in class discussion by either answering a question or giving a personal view, as appropriate to the class focus or aim, in 3 out of 4 occurrences, as assessed by his ELA, Math, Science and Social Studies teachers over two consecutive weeks of targeted observation.

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TRANSITION
  • Student has stated that she wants to become an EKG technician like her mother and work in a hospital. She needs to learn more about how electrocardiograms are produced and the equipment that is used and about the information that is captured in an EKG.
  • Goal: In one year, given advisory assistance from the transition linkage coordinator, student will compile a monthly log of ten literature responses to internet search articles about the human heart, related biological issues and the EKG process and use, as measured by appropriate 3-paragraph short essays that reflect the topic. Progress will be measured by 100% completion of the ten essays.
  • Student has difficulty organizing her thoughts on paper. She likes to write but stated that punctuation, spelling and grammar slows her thought process when writing. During her Level 1 Vocational Assessment she indicated that her interest is in working with children, and she wants to become a teacher
  • Goal :In one year, student will complete job/college application essays written on her career topic, Teaching. Using a graphic organizer to organize her thought, she will complete 10 job/career essays. She will check her work using a rubric and/or checklist to self-correct errors. Provider will measure progress each report card period through work samples and/or portfolio assessment.
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TRANSITION, continued
  • Student has difficulty speaking in public. When asked to answer a question in class she is often reluctant stating that she fears she is incorrect.
  • Goal: In one year, during a simulated job interview with a staff member or peer, student will respond appropriately to ten questions used in interviews with 100% accuracy in 3 out of 4 trials as assessed by her teacher over four consecutive weeks through observations and recorded answers.
  • Student has decided to pursue a career in animal care. She wants to focus on becoming a veterinarian. Her writing lacks appropriate sentence structure and paragraph organizational skills. She writes in simple sentences and does not use enough details to support her ideas. ….
  • Goal: Within one year, Carmen will complete a journal by writing eight to ten sentences for each entry, including an opening topic sentence, supporting details, and a concluding sentence, reflecting information learned from viewing 20 documentaries or informational shows about animals, on television and/or the internet, related to animals and animal care professions. Progress will be evaluated monthly for 80% accuracy based on a rubric, one entry per documentary, two full entries per month.