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Provided by: Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN). Indicator 13 Ensuring Coordinated, Measurable, Annual IEP Goals and Transition Services. Agenda. Indicator 13 requirements Indicator 13 self-assessment Age-appropriate transition assessments Post-school goals

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agenda
Agenda

Indicator 13 requirements

Indicator 13 self-assessment

Age-appropriate transition assessments

Post-school goals

Present levels

Measurable annual goals

Transition grids to goals

state performance plan spp
State Performance Plan(SPP)

Evaluate the State’s efforts to implement the requirements and purposes of IDEA

Describe how the State will improve such implementation

6-Year Plan

20 indicators related to the 3 priorities

Annual Performance Report

spp indicator 13
SPP Indicator 13

Percent of youth aged 14 and above with an IEP that includes coordinated, measurable annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the student to meet the post-secondary goals

Target: 100% compliance!

indicator 13 checklist
Indicator 13 Checklist

National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center (NSTTAC)

National technical assistance and dissemination center

Funded from January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2010

U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs

http://www.nsttac.org

assessment
Assessment

Interests– a measure of opinions, attitudes and preferences

Preferences– what the student values and likes

Aptitudes– a combination of abilities and other characteristics that suggest whether a student might learn or become proficient in a particular area

Abilities– natural talents or acquired proficiencies

shown by a student

examples of formal assessments
Examples of Formal Assessments

Standardized Tests– Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), American College Testing Program (ACT)

Aptitude Tests– Weschsler Adult Intellegence Scale (WAISIII), The System for Assessment and Group Evaluation (SAGE), McCarron-Dial Evaluation System (MDS), Career Ability Placement Survey (CAPS), Woodcock Johnson Revised

Interest Tests– Career (California) Occupational Preference System (COPS), Kuder General Interest Survey (KGIS), Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory, Keys2Work

examples of informal assessments
Examples of Informal Assessments

Student Survey/Interview

Parent Survey/Interview

Observations (Home/School/Community)

Teacher Questionnaires

Person-Centered Planning

Work Samples

Situational Assessment

Curriculum-Based Assessments

Ecological Assessment

Functional Behavioral Assessment

examples of other assessments
Examples of Other Assessments

Information from student and family members

Information from employers

Interests, preferences, aptitudes, abilities

Career and technical education assessments

Progress monitoring

Review of the student’s IEP

indicator 13 checklist transition assessment s
Indicator 13 Checklist: Transition Assessment(s)

1. Is there evidence of age-appropriate transition assessment(s)?

Yes or No

§300.320(b)(1)

indicator 13 checklist transition assessment s16
Indicator 13 Checklist: Transition Assessment(s)

Locate where information relates to

assessment and the transition component

on the IEP (either in the IEP, ER, or the

student’s file)

If there is evidence … circleY.

If there is no evidence… circle N.

post school goals
Post-School Goals
  • Identifies where student will be AFTER high school
  • NOT intended to describe events that occur IN high school
  • NOT the same thing as an IEP annual goal
  • Addresses education/training, employment, independent living
  • Is observable, countable
sample post secondary education training goals
Sample Post-secondary Education/Training Goals

1. 2 or 4 year college

2. Postsecondary vocational training program

3. Short-term education or employment training program

4. Community or technical college

5. Apprenticeship program

6. On–the-job training

7. Licensing program (Nursing, Cosmetology, etc.)

8. Adult continuing education courses

9. Adult Training Facility

10. Adult center program

11. Adult in-home program

12. Other training program - please describe: ____________________

13. The IEP team has determined that this goal area is not applicable

sample employment goals
Sample Employment Goals
  • 1. Competitive employment
  • 2. Military
  • 3. Supported employment (paid work in a community setting for those needing continuous support services)
  • 4. Sheltered employment (where most workers have disabilities)
  • 5. Employment that allows for technological and medical supports
  • The IEP team has determined that this goal area is not applicable for this student
sample independent living goals
Sample Independent Living Goals

1.Independent -- will access community resources and

programs without support

2.Family support -- will access community resources and

programs with family supports

3.Agency support -- will access community resources and

programs with agency supports

4.The IEP team has determined that this goal area is not

applicable for the student

indicator 13 checklist post school goal s
Indicator 13 Checklist: Post-School Goal(s)

Yes or No

2. Is (Are) there a measurable postsecondary goal or goals that covers education or training, employment, and, as needed, independent living?

Note: the term “postsecondary goal” and “post-school goal” are synonymous.

20 USC 1414 614(d)(1)(A)(i)(VIII)(aa)

indicator 13 checklist post school goal s26
Indicator 13 Checklist: Post-School Goal(s)

Locate the transition component of the IEP

Are there post-school goal(s) for this student that address Education / Training, Employment, and (if applicable) Independent Living after high school? (Y or N)

Can the goal(s) be observed? (Y or N)

Will the goal(s) occur after the student graduates from school? (Y or N)

slide27
If yesto all three, then circle Y

Otherwise, circle N

Indicator 13 Checklist: Post-School Goal(s)

transition activity service
Transition activity / service

Action steps

Slated to occur during current IEP

Leading to achievement of post-school goal

Put all together from 1st year to final year of transition planning = coordinated set of activities

slide30

Post-secondary Education/Training

Specific area of study ___________________________

School of interest ______________________________

_____ ASVAB ____PSAT/SAT ____ accommodations

_____ College fairs _____ College/facility tour

_____ Application _____ Financial Aid

_____ Note taking _____ Organizational skills

_____ Time management _____ Self-disclosure

_____ Documentation (recent, by licensed psychologist,

with rationale for accommodations)

_____ Request accommodations

_____ Hiram Andrews information

slide31

Employment

Specific career interest ____________________

_____ Career exploration (software programs, guest

speakers, graduation project)

_____ In-school work experience

_____ Community service

_____ Job shadowing

_____ Job tryouts

_____ Work experience

_____ Vocational-technical school

_____ Tour

_____ Shadow vocational programs

_____ Co-op job placement (career-tech centers)

slide32

Employment

_____ Community-based instruction (pre-employment,

travel training, social skills, etc)

_____ Career TRACK

_____ CareerLink

_____ DPW Employment Program referral

_____ OVR referral

_____ Determination of eligibility

_____ Employment services

_____ Job training

_____ MH/MR referral

_____ Employment services

_____ Training services

slide33

Independent Living (Residential)

_____ Home responsibilities

_____ Participate in apartment program

_____ Summer camps

_____ Open case with MH/MR Base Service Unit

_____ Supports Coordination

_____ Community Living Arrangements

_____ Respite care

_____ Companionship / social groups

_____ Community-based instruction (shopping/money

skills, pedestrian safety, social skills,

communication)

_____ Section 8 housing

slide34

Independent Living

(Participation)

_____ Transportation

_____ Driver’s license _____ Photo ID

_____ Public transportation

_____ Family transportation

_____ Special transportation

_____ Car pool

_____ Voter registration

_____ Selective service

_____ Jury duty information

_____ Court system / obeying the laws

_____ Community-based instruction (travel training,

social skills, etc)

slide35

Independent Living

(Recreation / Leisure)

Current hobbies _______________________

____________________________________

Current clubs _________________________

____________________________________

Current social activities _________________

____________________________________

_____ Community-based instruction (recreation,

social skills, sports, etc)

_____ Local clubs, teen centers

_____ Service organizations (AkTion Club, Kiwanis,etc)

_____ Church groups

indicator 13 checklist transition services
Indicator 13 Checklist: Transition Services

3. Are there transition services in the IEP that focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child to facilitate their movement from school to post-school?

Yes or No

20 USC 1401 602(34)(A)

indicator 13 checklist transition services39
Indicator 13 Checklist: Transition Services

Locate where transition services/activities are listed on the IEP (the grid).

For each post-school goal, if there is

(a) instruction,

(b) related service(s),

(c) community experience,

(d) development of employment and other post-school adult living objective,

(e) if appropriate, acquisition of daily living skill(s), OR

(f) if appropriate, provision of a functional vocational evaluation listed in association with meeting the post-school goal,

circle Y

indicator 13 checklist transition services40
Indicator 13 Checklist: Transition Services

For each post-school goal, if there is no

(a) instruction,

(b) related service,

(c) community experience,

(d) development of employment and other post-school adult living objective,

(e) if appropriate, acquisition of a daily living skill, or

(f) if appropriate, provision of a functional vocational evaluation listed in association with meeting the post-school goal,

circle N

indicator 13 checklist courses of study
Indicator 13 Checklist: Courses of Study

4. Do the transition services include courses of

study that focus on improving the academic

and functional achievement of the child to facilitate their movement from school to post-school?

Yes or No

§300.320(b)(2)

indicator 13 checklist courses of study44
Indicator 13 Checklist: Courses of Study

Locate the list of courses of study in the

grid.

Do the courses listed align with the student’s identified post-school goal(s)?

If yes, circle Y.

If no, circle N.

slide47

Agencies

_____ Office of Vocational Rehabilitation

_____ Mental Health

_____ Mental Retardation

_____ Blind and Visual Services

_____ Department of Public Welfare

_____ Children and Youth Services

_____ Juvenile Justice System

_____ Social Security Administration

_____ Career TRACK

_____ The Arc

_____ Centers for Independent Living

_____ accessAbilities, Inc

other agencies supporting youth and adults with disabilities
Other Agencies Supporting Youth and Adults with Disabilities

Centers for Independent Living

Office of Medical Assistance

Office for the Deaf & Hearing Impaired (L&I/DPW)

Children Youth and Families

Drug and Alcohol programs

United Cerebral Palsy Association

Mental Health Association

Epilepsy Foundation

Special Olympics

word of caution
Word of Caution!

Never commit an agency or

an individual for a service or

activity without their full

knowledge and participation!

indicator 13 checklist agency representation
Indicator 13 Checklist: Agency Representation

5. For transition services that are likely to be provided or paid for by other agencies, is there evidence that representatives of the agency(ies) were invited with parent consent to the IEP meeting?

YesNoNA

§300.321(b)(3)

indicator 13 checklist agency representation51
Indicator 13 Checklist: Agency Representation

For the current year, is there evidence (in the IEP, ER, invitation, or the student’s file) that representatives of any of the following agencies/services should be invited to participate in the IEP development: postsecondary education, vocationaleducation, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adultservices, independent living or community participation for this post-school goal? (Y or N)

Was consent obtained from the parent? (Y or N)

If yesto both, then circle Y

indicator 13 checklist agency representation52
Indicator 13 Checklist: Agency Representation

If it is too early to determine if the student will need outside agency involvement, or no agency is likely to provide or pay for transition services, circle NA

If an agency should be invited but parent did not consent, circle NA

indicator 13 checklist agency representation53
Indicator 13 Checklist: Agency Representation

If no invitation is evident and a participating agency is likely to be responsible for providing or paying for transition services and there was consent to invite them to the IEP meeting, then circle N.

present levels
Present Levels

It is impossible to write clear and measurable goals if you don’t haveclearandmeasurablepresent levels of academic achievement and functional performance.

present levels must
Present Levels Must:
  • Identify strengths and prioritize needs
  • Describe effect of disability on performance
  • Provide a starting point for development of annual goals
  • Guide development of other areas of the IEP
  • Be data driven (measurable and observable)
  • Reference post-school transition goal(s)
1 identify strengths and prioritize needs
1. Identify Strengths and Prioritize Needs
  • Can address academic, nonacademic, and functional performance
  • Includes successful instructional strategies
  • Includes motivators for participation and learning
2 effect of the disability on performance
2. Effect of the Disability on Performance

Identifies strengths

  • Relates academic, developmental, functional needs related to disability
    • Each need ~ goal/objective/SDI
  • Describes both the descriptive and quantitative levels of involvement and progress in general curriculum
3 starting point for annual goal development
3. Starting Point for Annual Goal Development
  • Identifies the current performance level of the student in relationship to identified needs (baseline)
  • Provides information about rate of progress so you can determine an ending point
4 guide development of other areas of iep
4. Guide Development of Other Areas of IEP
  • Provides adequate and comprehensive information
  • Should not refer to other documentation “somewhere else”
  • Identifies specific instructional techniques, accommodations, and modifications that are relevant
5 data driven
5. Data Driven
  • Quantifies student skill levels in academic and nonacademic areas

*Provides “action·able information”

  • Provides data as the foundation for writing quantitative present levels

*Curriculum based assessment *Evaluations

*Permanent products *Teacher input

*Observations *Interviews

*Parent input *Anecdotal records

AGE-APPROPRIATE TRANSITIONASSESSMENTS

6 reference post school transition goal s
6. Reference Post-School Transition Goal(s)
  • Strengths and needs include transition information
  • Effect of disability on post-school goal(s)
  • Starting point for annual goal for transition
  • Contains information for other parts of IEP
  • Based on data (measurable, countable)
example
Example:

Not measurable:

“Diane is doing better in math.”

example64
Example:

Measurable:

“Diane adds, subtracts, multiplies, and divides multiple-digit computation problems with fewer than 3 errors on a mixed-skill math probe……”

example65
Example:

Measurable AND transition related:

“….. and makes an average of 2 errors per week making change at her volunteer job at the snack shop at the Pattan Medical Center.”

example66
Example:

Not measurable:

“Jim has difficulty keeping up with his homework assignments.”

Measurable:

“Jim completes / turns in 2 out of 10 homework assignments.”

example67
Example:

Measurable AND Transition Related:

“Jim completes / turns in 2 out of 10

homework assignments. He plans

to attend a community college in

the fall where homework assignments

are expected on time and complete.”

present levels of academic achievement
Present Levels of Academic Achievement

Includes information regarding how child is performing within the general education curriculum as it relates to post-school goal

Includes reading, writing, and math instructional levels as it relates to post school goal

present levels of academic achievement69
Present Levels of Academic Achievement

Includes description of academic skills as it relates to post-school goal

Provides baseline for annual goals

Not just grades, scores, or (as an example) the book child is working on in reading series

present levels of functional performance
Present Levels of Functional Performance

Describes how child functions in the activities of daily living, such as hygiene, dressing, basic consumer skills, community-based instruction, etc

Describes functional academic skills, such as a functional reading level of 2nd grade for a 10th grade child

present levels of functional performance71
Present Levels of Functional Performance

Describes functional behavioral skills, such as ability to follow a schedule, basic social skills

Describes adult life readiness, work experiences, career activities, aptitudes, interests, abilities

Remember:

as it relates to post-school goal

present levels transition
Present Levels – Transition

Indicate types of transition assessments and results derived

Relate specifically to identified post-school goal(s)

slide73

Present Levels

….. of academic achievement

….. of functional performance

….. related to current post secondary transition goals if the student's age is 14 or younger if determined appropriate by the IEP team.

Parental concerns

How the student’s disability affects involvement and progress in the general education curriculum

Strengths

Academic, developmental, and functional needs related to student's disability

slide74

Present Levels

STATEMENTS SHOULD DESCRIBE WHAT THE STUDENT IS ABLE TO DO,

WHAT HE/SHE KNOWS,

SKILLS HE/SHE HAS.

let me show you
Let me show you!

“Classroom performance is inconsistent.”

What is meant by “classroom performance”?

Define it!

What is meant by “inconsistent”?

Define it!

let me show you classroom performance is inconsistent
Let me show you! “Classroom performance is inconsistent.”

Classroom performance?

Follows 2-stepdirections

Inconsistent?

Ranges from 1/5 trials to 4/5 trials

Put it All Together:

Tucker follows 2-step directions inconsistently, ranging from 1/5 to 4/5 successful trials.

let me show you classroom performance is inconsistent77
Let me show you! “Classroom performance is inconsistent.”

Classroom performance?

Maintains 3-ring binder of study guides for each core academic class

Inconsistent?

Ranges from 1 -- 8 missing guides per week

Put it All Together:

Charlie maintains study guides for his academic classes, averaging 4 missing guides per week.

measurable annual goal
Measurable Annual Goal

IEP goal, covers one year

Addresses skill deficits (identified in needs)

Begins from baseline of skill (present levels)

Describes skill attainment level (endpoint)

NOT curriculum

Contains measurable, countable data

Leads to visual, countable monitoring

Not more than 3-5 goals

annual goals are
Annual Goals Are:

Measurable estimates of expected student

outcomes in an academic year based on the

student’s present levels of academic

achievement and functional

performance and anticipated rate

of learning.

annual goals must
Annual Goals Must:

Address identified needs (from present levels of academic achievement and functional performance)

Provide clear focus for instruction

Allow us to select appropriate materials

Improve instructional efficiency

annual goals will
Annual Goals Will:

Enable progress monitoring

Communicate expectations

Project student performance at the end of one year of instruction

grids goals86
Grids → Goals

Given a list of 25 restaurant and signs in the community, Nick will be able to orally read 100% of the words in isolation (in the classroom) and in context (in the community) 4 out of 5 trials over 3 consecutive weeks.

grids goals88
Grids → Goals

Given decreasing supports and cue cards with necessary information, Jane will ride public transportation 5x / week, over 4 weeks, to successfully travel from school to her job independently.

grids goals90
Grids → Goals

Given instruction and an alarm watch, Reggie will begin and end his shift at work with the setting of an alarm, 100% of the time 5x/week over 4 consecutive weeks independently.

slide91

Criteria for Writing

Measurable Annual Goals:

  • Condition
  • Student’s Name
  • Clearly Defined Behavior
  • Performance Criteria

Adapted from Strategies for Writing Better Goals and Short Term Objectives or Benchmarks by Benjamin Lignugaris/Kraft Nancy Marchand-Martella and Ronald Martella Sept/Oct 2001 Teaching Exceptional Children

condition
Condition

Describes the situation in which the student will perform the behavior (e.g.. accommodations, assistance provided prior to or during assessment)

Examples:

During lunch breaks on the job …

Given picture checklists to follow …..

Requires a clear description of the material that will be used to evaluate the learning outcome

Evaluation setting

condition example
Condition Example

Given a list of 25 restaurant and signs in the community, Nick will be able to orally read 100% of the words in isolation (in the classroom) and in context (in the community) 4 out of 5 trials over 3 consecutive weeks.

condition example94
Condition Example

Given a list of 25 restaurant and signs in the community, Nick will be able to orally read 100% of the words in isolation (in the classroom) and in context (in the community) 4 out of 5 trials over 3 consecutive weeks.

condition example95
Condition Example

Given decreasing supports and cue cards with necessary information, Jane will ride public transportation 5x / week, over 4 weeks, to successfully travel from school to her job independently.

condition example96
Condition Example

Given decreasing supports and cue cards with necessary information, Jane will ride public transportation 5x / week, over 4 weeks, to successfully travel from school to her job independently.

condition example97
Condition Example

Given instruction and an alarm watch, Reggie will begin and end his shift at work with the setting of an alarm, 100% of the time 5x/week over 4 consecutive weeks independently.

condition example98
Condition Example

Given instruction and an alarm watch, Reggie will begin and end his shift at work with the setting of an alarm, 100% of the time 5x/week over 4 consecutive weeks independently.

student name
Student Name

Should not be a problem ?

Caution if using “copy/paste”

Names

Pronouns (she/he and him/her)

clearly defined behavior
Clearly Defined Behavior

Describe the behavior in measurable, observable terms

Ask yourself…what will the student actually DO?

Examples:

Say, print, write, read orally, point to…

Non-examples:

Understand, know, recognize, behave, comprehend, improve…

clearly defined behavior example
Clearly Defined Behavior Example

Given a list of 25 restaurant and signs in the community, Nick will be able to orally read 100% of the words in isolation (in the classroom) and in context (in the community) 4 out of 5 trials over 3 consecutive weeks.

clearly defined behavior example102
Clearly Defined Behavior Example

Given a list of 25 restaurant and signs in the community, Nick will be able to orally read 100% of the words in isolation (in theclassroom) and in context (in the community) 4 out of 5 trials over 3 consecutive weeks.

clearly defined behavior example103
Clearly Defined Behavior Example

Given decreasing supports and cue cards with necessary information, Jane will ride public transportation 5x / week, over 4 weeks, to successfully travel from school to her job independently.

clearly defined behavior example104
Clearly Defined Behavior Example

Given decreasing supports and cue cards with necessary information, Jane will ride public transportation 5x / week, over 4 weeks, to successfully travel from school to her job independently.

clearly defined behavior example105
Clearly Defined Behavior Example

Given instruction and an alarm watch, Reggie will begin and end his shift at work with the setting of an alarm, 100% of the time 5x/week over 4 consecutive weeks independently.

clearly defined behavior example106
Clearly Defined Behavior Example

Given instruction and an alarm watch, Reggie will begin and end his shift at work with the setting of an alarm, 100% of the time 5x/week over 4 consecutive weeks independently.

performance criteria
PerformanceCriteria

Criterion Level

The level the student must demonstrate for mastery

Number of Times Needed to Demonstrate Mastery

How consistently the student needs to perform the skill(s) before it’s considered “mastered”

Evaluation Schedule

Over what period of time must the behavior be observed at the level of mastery

performance criteria108
Performance Criteria

Performance criteria should set up “test “ situations for progress monitoring

Performance criteria should reflect the type of measurement that is meaningful for the skill

slide109

Performance Criteria

  • % of time
  • # times/#times
  • with # or % of accuracy
  • with fewer than # errors
  • words/digits/ correct per minute
  • with “x” movement on a prompting hierarchy
  • “x” or better on a rubric
  • with no more than “x” occurrences of…
  • with an “x” or better on “x” rating scale
  • with “x/x” points on an assessment checklist
  • independently
performance criteria example
Performance Criteria Example

Given a list of 25 restaurant and signs in the community, Nick will be able to orally read 100% of the words in isolation (in the classroom) and in context (in the community) 4 out of 5 trials over 3 consecutive weeks.

performance criteria example111
Performance Criteria Example

Given a list of 25 restaurant and signs in the community, Nick will be able to orally read 100% of the words in isolation (in the classroom) and in context (in the community) 4 out of 5 trials over 3 consecutive weeks.

performance criteria example112
Performance Criteria Example

Given decreasing supports and cue cards with necessary information, Jane will ride public transportation 5x / week, over 4 weeks, to successfully travel from school to her job independently.

performance criteria example113
Performance Criteria Example

Given decreasing supports and cue cards with necessary information, Jane will ride public transportation 5x / week, over 4 weeks, to successfully travel from school to her job independently.

performance criteria example114
Performance Criteria Example

Given instruction and an alarm watch, Reggie will begin and end his shift at work with the setting of an alarm, 100% of the time 5x/week over 4 consecutive weeks independently.

performance criteria example115
Performance Criteria Example

Given instruction and an alarm watch, Reggie will begin and end his shift at work with the setting of an alarm, 100% of the time 5x/week over 4 consecutive weeks independently.

does this goal measure up
Does this goal measure up?

John will learn and apply sorting skills at his job.

  • Condition:
  • Student Name:
  • Clearly Defined Behavior:
  • Performance Criteria:
does this goal measure up117
Does this goal measure up?

John will learn and apply sorting skills at his job.

  • Condition:
  • Student Name: John
  • Clearly Defined Behavior:
  • Performance Criteria:
does this goal measure up118
Does this goal measure up?

Given mail slots with initial letters enlarged and

underlined, John will sort mail by name of staff member at

work with 100% accuracy for 10 consecutive daily sorting

assignments.

  • Condition:
  • Student Name:
  • Clearly Defined Behavior:
  • Performance Criteria:
does this goal measure up119
Does this goal measure up?

Given mail slots with initial letters enlarged and

underlined, John will sort mail by name of staff member

at work with 100% accuracy for 10 consecutive daily

sorting assignments.

  • Condition: Given mail slots with initial letters enlarged and underlined
  • Student Name: John
  • Clearly Defined Behavior: sort mail by name of staff member at work
  • Performance Criteria: 100% accuracy for 10 consecutive daily sorting assignments.
let me show you120
Let me show you!

Original:

Lisa will display organizational skills in all

academic areas.

Improved:

Given color-coded folders and a bin in the

resource room, Lisa will keep regular education

assignments in designated folders 100% of the

time for 15 consecutive daily checks.

let me show you121
Let me show you!

Original:

Lisa will display organizational skills in all

academic areas.

Improved:

When attending regular education classes, Lisa

will bring required materials (text, folder,

pencil, etc.) 100% of the time over 6 random

weekly checks.

indicator 13 checklist measurable goal s
Indicator 13 Checklist: Measurable Goal(s)

Yes or No

6. Is (are) there measurable annual IEP goal(s) that will reasonably enable the child to meet the postsecondary goal(s)?

Indicator 13 language

indicator 13 checklist measurable goal s124
Indicator 13 Checklist: Measurable Goal(s)

Locate the transition component of the IEP (the grid)

For each post-school goal on the grid, is there an indication that at least one annual goal is included in the IEP for that goal area? (Y or N)

Now find the annual goals pages in the IEP.

Locate the specific annual goal that relates to

the transition goal (as indicated on the grid).

indicator 13 checklist measurable goal s125
Indicator 13 Checklist: Measurable Goal(s)

Does each annual goal contain the following components: (circleYif all four are present)

A condition

Student’s name

Clearly defined behavior

Performance criteria

For each post-school goal, if there is noannual goal included in the IEP that will help the student make progress towards the stated goal OR if the annual goal does not contain all four required components (and therefore, is not measurable), circle N

indicator 13 checklist127
Indicator 13 checklist

Does the IEP meet the requirements of Indicator 13? (Circle one)

If all Ys or NAs for each item (1 – 6) on the Checklist, then circle Yes

If one or more Ns are circled, then circle No

YES or NO

contact information
Contact information:

PaTTAN King of Prussia

800-441-3215 in PA only

PaTTAN Harrisburg

800-360-7282 in PA only

PaTTAN Pittsburgh

800-446-5607 in PA only