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Fatigue management in Crossrail

Fatigue management in Crossrail

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Fatigue management in Crossrail

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  1. Fatigue management in Crossrail Martin Brown, Health and Safety Director Crossrail

  2. Target Zero Approach We all have the right to go home unharmed every day We believe that all harm is preventable We must all work together to achieve this

  3. Safety as a value Health and Safety is our Value not our Priority

  4. Understanding risks from Fatigue • 20% rail accidents • Sleep • debt Requirements contained in Works Information

  5. Health Company Strategy

  6. How much sleep? • Sleep plays an important role in our overall health • Ideally 7-9 hours of good sleep each night • Alternatively 6 hours of good sleep + naps (8/24 hrs) • Some people may need only 6 while others prefer 9 • Research shows that women who sleep only 5 hours were at 45% higher risk of heart disease. Having less sleep - to undertake more, makes people far less productive – and this may be work on non work related

  7. Causes of fatigue

  8. Individual Individual causes • Circadian rhythm • Health conditions • Sleep quality • Lifestyle • Poor Diet • Poor Hydration • Excessive Alcohol • Excessive/ timing of caffeine • Lack of Exercise outside of work • Depressed Mood eg relationships, injury etc • Other factors

  9. Healthy sleep Awake REM Sleep 1. Dozing 2. Light Sleep 3. Deeper Sleep 4. Deep Sleep 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Hours after going to bed

  10. Alcohol induced sleep Awake REM Sleep 1. Dozing 2. Light Sleep 3. Deeper Sleep 4. Deep Sleep 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Hours after going to bed It only takes 2 standard drinks (20g alcohol)

  11. Caffeine stimulated sleep Awake REM Sleep 1. Dozing 2. Light Sleep 3. Deeper Sleep 4. Deep Sleep 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Hours after going to bed

  12. Work causes Work • Long daily work hours • Concentrating for extended periods • High risk activities • Shiftwork • New at job or skill • Working alone • Being on call • Working night shift

  13. Crossrail research

  14. BBMV use of Fatigue Science tool • http://fatiguescience.wistia.com/medias/bcusz7sm9d

  15. Crossrail Working Hours Policy • An uninterrupted break of 1 day in 7 days or 2 days in 14 day period • A minimum rest break of 20 minutes when working more than 6 hours and 2 breaks if working 12 hours • No more than 12 hours per day shift, 14 hours door to door • No more than 10 hours per night shift or early shift • First night shift no more than 8 hours • Have a minimum of 12 hours rest between shifts or 14 hours for consecutives nights • Not work more than 60 hours in any 7 day period • An uninterrupted break of 1 day in 7 days or 2 days in 14 day period • Overtime not to exceed 2 hours past usual shift

  16. Insufficient breaks Not using breaks effectively Noise, vibration and heat Repetitive or boring tasks High physical and/or mental exertion • Work environment causes Work Environment

  17. Home environment causes • Sleep disruptions – neighbours, family, living in multiple occupancy accommodation • Poor sleep habits – late to bed, watching tv • Family - illness, new baby • Worries – financial or domestic Home Environment

  18. CRL's Fatigue Management Plan • Step 1 - Identify all staff who work some form of shift roster patterns • Step 2 - Apply the HSE Index, if the pattern falls outside, re-evaluate • Step 3 - Occupational health assessments for all on night shifts • Step 4 – Provision of information and training for those ‘at risk’ to better understand lifestyle issues • Step 5 – Review of fatigue after a month, and every 3 months • Step 6 – Investigations to consider fatigue, if root cause review • Step 7 - Each year undertake a management review

  19. Some comments on the Plan • HSE index fails to consider the non-work areas • The Fatigue Science highlighted differences, questioning some changes to shift length • Non-rostered work is a difficult policy area, but a key element of possible fatigue and support areas • Use of the Epworth Sleepiness Score and CRL’s Risk Assessment used in addition • Information sheets included coping with shift work and tell tale signs of fatigue; effective information really does make a difference • Occupational Health Assessments have highlighted symptoms of fatigue related illness • Still more to do in assessing fatigue in incidents

  20. Toolkit development Toolkit for Crossrail Contractors Further details can be found on the Crossrail Learning Legacy website

  21. Learning Legacy https://learninglegacy.crossrail.co.uk/