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Sikhism – The 5 K’s. Learning Objective: To understand that the 5k’s are symbols of the Khalsa. The Five K’s. Every man and woman who belongs to the Khalsa must wear five symbols which show that they are Sikhs.

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sikhism the 5 k s

Sikhism – The 5 K’s

Learning Objective:

To understand that the 5k’s are symbols of the Khalsa.

the five k s
The Five K’s

Every man and woman who belongs to the Khalsa must wear five symbols which show that they are Sikhs.

They are usually called the Five K’s because in Punjabi their names all begin with the letter ‘K’.

1 kesh
(1) Kesh
  • Kesh is hair. Sikhs promise not to cut their hair but let it grow as a symbol of their faith. Because during their lifetimes it will get very long they wear turbans to keep it tidy.
  • They believe that this demonstrates their obedience to God.

A Sikh wearing a Turban

2 kangha
(2) Kangha
  • The Kangha is a small wooden comb. It keeps the hair fixed in place, and is a symbol of cleanliness. Combing their hair reminds Sikhs that their lives should be tidy and organised. Take note year 6!

The Kangha

3 the kara
(3) The Kara
  • The kara is a steel bangle worn on the arm. It is a closed circle with no beginning and no end...as with God there is no beginning and no end.
  • It is a reminder to behave well, keep faith and restrain from wrong doing. Wearing it will remind a sikh of his duties.

The Kara

the last two are a reminder that sikhs are warriors and always fight for what is right

The Last two are a reminder that Sikhs are warriors and always fight for what is right!

The last two K’s are:

The Kachera

The Kirpan

4 the kachera
(4) The Kachera
  • These are short trousers worn as underwear. They were more practical than the long, loose clothes most people in India wore at the time of Guru Gobind Singh.
  • The Guru said they were a symbol that Sikhs were leaving old ideas behind, following new better ones.

The Kachera

5 the kirpan
(5) The Kirpan
  • The warriors sword. These days a very tiny one is worn as a symbol of dignity and self respect.
  • It demonstrates power and reminds sikhs that they must fight a spiritual battle, defend the weak and oppressed, and uphold the truth.

The Kirpan

today s activity
Today’s Activity!
  • Draw and label the 5 K’s in your Multicultural Education books!
  • Label your illustrations and explain each of the 5 K’s.