rattle those pots and pans classroom cooking activities incorporating technology and literacy l.
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Rattle Those Pots and Pans: Classroom Cooking Activities Incorporating Technology and Literacy

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  1. Rattle Those Pots and Pans:Classroom Cooking Activities Incorporating Technology and Literacy Holly Cooper, Ph.D. Pat Van Geem hollycooper@tsbvi.edupatvangeem@tsbvi.edu Outreach Assistive Technology Consultants Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

  2. Benefits of cooking activities Cooking is a motivating activity for many people. Cooking provides experiences with: • Aromas • Colors • Textures • Shapes • Temperatures • Weights

  3. Benefits of cooking activities Cooking is • A pleasant way to spend time with others or alone • A channel for activity: stirring, pouring, cleaning up

  4. Benefits of cooking activities • Students who do not like to eat may enjoy food preparation and tasting • Students who are tube fed can experience food in a fun, non-threatening way

  5. Benefits of cooking activities Cooking is age appropriate for a variety of students Very young children can pour, stir, spread, taste, touch and smell

  6. Benefits of cooking activities Cooking is beneficial for elementary school students They can cook simple meals or special treats for an instructional activity

  7. Benefits of cooking activities Cooking is beneficial for secondary aged students who can • Participate in home economics in an inclusion setting • Participate in vocational or life skills training

  8. Benefits of cooking activities Cooking is a good activity in which to use technology Almost any student can participate with support

  9. Benefits of cooking activities Cooking is a good activity in which to use media modifications for: • Print readers • Braille readers • Tactile symbol users • Picture symbol users

  10. Benefits of cooking activities Cooking is a good way to teach communication skills in a functional context: • Requesting • Responding • Turn taking • Responding to novel situations or surprises

  11. Benefits of cooking activities Cooking is a good way to include peers as a helper or as a participant

  12. Benefits of cooking activities Cooking is a good way to teach academic skills in a functional context: • Reading • Math • Science • Geography

  13. Benefits of cooking activities Cooking is a crucial part of the Expanded Core Curriculum See the RECC at http://www.tsbvi.edu/recc/index.htm

  14. Benefits of cooking activities Cooking is a multi-sensory activity that can address a variety of learning domains (See infused skills checklist)

  15. Getting Ready Find a good location in the room or school • In a kitchen or kitchen area • Near a water source • Near a power source • In a location where snacks or meals are served

  16. Getting Ready Suggested tools if you don’t have a kitchen: (any or all) • Small fridge • Microwave • Blender • Toaster oven • Hot plate • Hot pot or rice cooker

  17. Planning the Activity What tools and appliances will be used? • Make sure you have everything assembled • Or plan for where the students must go to get them in natural but accessible locations

  18. Planning the Activity Plan with the students: • Choose the food or recipe together • Talk about the ingredients, review vocabulary and “sight” words • Talk about what tools ingredients will be used, and where you find them

  19. Planning the Activity What modifications are needed? Prepare: • Photographs • Braille • Print • Tactile symbols • Communication overlays • Recipes

  20. Planning the Activity Shopping: Can this become part of the activity? • Make grocery lists • Plan for transportation • Count money • Look for advertisements (prices)

  21. Planning the Activity Money • Donations of money or ingredients from parents • Sell your product to raise money: popcorn, cookies, dog biscuits

  22. Doing It • Wash hands and food surfaces • Beware of the good fairy syndrome • Minimize prompting • Maximize communication opportunities • Clean up is part of the activity

  23. Reviewing It Talk about the activity afterwards • Conversations help review the spoken or signed vocabulary • Write an Experience Story, it helps review print, braille or tactile symbols

  24. Reviewing It Experience story: • Collect “artifacts” during the activity: photos, packages, etc • Talk about the steps involved in fixing the food • Talk about who did which steps • Talk about who liked the taste • Write it in accessible format • Share it with peers, parents

  25. Alternative Food Experiences For students who are tube fed, have trouble eating or find food aversive: • Encourage these students to touch, smell and taste (if allowed) • Guide students gently to put their hands in doughs or batters

  26. Alternative Food Experiences For students who are tube fed, have trouble eating or find food aversive: • Make smoothies using yogurt, ice cream or fruit juice as a base • Experiment with frozen treats • Make healthy sweet snacks such as apple sauce • Avoid temperature extremes (except some students love ice cream and frozen treats)

  27. Repetition is not only O.K. it’s good educational programming Cook often and have fun!

  28. The end