connecting sw pbis to the classroom designing classroom supports
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Connecting SW-PBIS to the Classroom: Designing Classroom Supports

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 50

Connecting SW-PBIS to the Classroom: Designing Classroom Supports - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 163 Views
  • Uploaded on

Connecting SW-PBIS to the Classroom: Designing Classroom Supports . Patti Hershfeldt, Ed.D. Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Prevention of Youth Violence [email protected] Objective.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Connecting SW-PBIS to the Classroom: Designing Classroom Supports' - Pat_Xavi


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
connecting sw pbis to the classroom designing classroom supports

Connecting SW-PBIS to the Classroom: Designing Classroom Supports

Patti Hershfeldt, Ed.D.

Johns Hopkins University

Bloomberg School of Public Health

Center for Prevention of Youth Violence

[email protected]

objective
Objective
  • Identify actions for a school-wide team to improve the quality of classroom management throughout their school
big idea
Big Idea
  • We often assume green zone is in place everywhere
    • But what about the classroom?
    • How is PBIS being used in the classroom to prevent yellow zone behaviors?
    • By fortifying the green zone, we can reduce need for yellow zone
today s questions
Today’s Questions
    • How important is classroom management?
  • How can teachers ‘grow the green’? How can we identify areas of strengths using the Classroom Management Self Assessment?
  • Classroom behavior support practices blend with school-wide systems
    • As a team, how will you work to make all classrooms effective settings?
what the research says about classroom management
What the Research Says about Classroom Management
  • Linked with positive student outcomes (academic and behavior)
  • Increased risk of preventing more serious problems among at-risk kids
  • Supports all students in the prevention of possible current and future behavior problems.
  • Strong management signals to kids that the class is a safe place to learn.
  • Well managed classrooms are rated as having more positive climates.

(Aber et al., 1998; Mitchell, Bradshaw & Leaf, 2009)

what the research says about classroom management1
What the Research says about Classroom Management
  • Greater student engagement (Morrison, 1979)
  • Friendlier peer interactions and helpful behaviors, more attentive, less aggression (Susman, Husten-Stein & Friedrich-Coffer, 1980).
  • Teachers experience greater efficacy (Woolfolk, 2002)
    • Increased student achievement
    • Creative and flexible instructional delivery
    • Teacher longevity
in a well managed classroom
In a Well-Managed Classroom
  • Students are actively involved in their work
  • Students know what is expected of them and are generally successful
  • There is relatively little wasted time, confusion, or disruption
  • The climate of the classroom is work-oriented, but relaxed and pleasant
in classrooms that were ineffective wehby symons shores 1995
In Classrooms that were IneffectiveWehby, Symons, & Shores (1995)
  • Less than half of student’s hand raises or correct academic responses were acknowledged by teachers
  • Less than 2 praise statements per hour
  • Most academic work consisted of independent seatwork
  • Inconsistent distribution of teacher attention
  • Compliance to a command generally resulted in the delivery of another command
5 key features of classroom management
5 Key Features of Classroom Management
  • Review each feature
  • Consider a system for taking this information to the whole faculty
  • Build a “measure” of school-wide classroom management
    • Use this measure for action planning and continuous improvement
slide11
Evidence Based Practices in Classroom Management

1. Maximize structure in your classroom.

2. Establish, teach, prompt, monitor, and evaluate a small number of positively stated expectations.

3. Maximize academic engaged time

4. Establish a continuum of strategies to acknowledge appropriate behavior.

5. Establish a continuum of strategies to respond to inappropriate behavior.

(Simonsen, Fairbanks, Briesch, Myers, & Sugai, 2008)

1 maximize structure
1. Maximize Structure
  • Develop Predictable Routines
    • Teacher routines
    • Student routines
  • Design an environment that..
    • elicits appropriate behavior
    • minimizes crowding and distraction
design a functional physical layout for the classroom
Design a Functional Physical Layout for the Classroom
  • Different areas of the classroom designed for different purposes
  • Traffic Patterns
  • Visual access
    • Teacher access to students at all times
    • Student access to instruction
  • Density
  • Teacher desk
questions for planning physical space
Questions for Planning Physical Space
  • How many students will you have in the room at one time?
  • How should your pupil’s seats be grouped?
  • What kinds of activities will be taking place in your classroom?
  • Do any students need to be isolated? If so, is it for certain activities or for most of the day?
  • How is movement in the classroom to be regulated?
  • What can you do to create a sense of well-being and safety for your students in your classroom?
2 establish teach prompt monitor and evaluate a small number of positively stated expectations
2. Establish, teach, prompt, monitor, and evaluate a small number of positively statedexpectations
establish behavioral expectations rules
Establish Behavioral Expectations/Rules
  • A small number (i.e., 3-5) of positively stated rules. Tell students what we want them to do, rather than telling them what we do not want them to do.

• Publicly post the rules.

• Should match SW Expectations

teach rules in the context of routines
Teach rules in the context of routines
  • Teach expectations explicitly.
  • Define rule in operational terms—tell students what the rule looks like within routine.
  • Provide students with examples and non-examples of rule-following.
  • Actively involve students in lesson—game, roleplay, etc. to check for their understanding.

• Provide opportunities to practice rule following behavior in the natural setting.

teach the rules
Teach the rules
  • Define and teach classroom routines
      • How to enter class and begin to work
      • How to predict the schedule for the day
      • What to do if you do not have materials
      • What to do if you need help
      • What to do if you need to go to the bathroom
      • What to do if you are handing in late material
      • What to do if someone is bothering you.
      • Signals for moving through different activities.
        • “Show me you are listening”
      • How to determine if you are doing well in class
  • Establish a signal for obtaining class attention
  • Teach effective transitions.
prompt or remind students of the rules
Prompt or remind students of the rules
  • Provide students with visual prompts (e.g., posters, illustrations, etc).

• Use pre-corrections, which include “verbal

reminders, behavioral rehearsals, or demonstrations of rule-following or socially appropriate behaviors that are presented in or before settings where problem behavior is likely” (Colvin, Sugai, Good, Lee, 1997).

monitor students behavior
Monitor students’ behavior
  • Active supervision
    • Move around
    • Look around
    • Interact with students
      • Reinforce
      • Correct
evaluate the effect of instruction
Evaluate the effect of instruction
  • Collect data
  • Are rules being followed?
  • If not ask..
    • who is making them?
    • where are the errors occurring?
    • what kind of errors are being made?
    • when are they being made?

• Summarize data (look for patterns)

• Use data to make decisions

establish teach review monitor and reinforce a small number of positively stated expectations
Establish, Teach, Review, Monitor, and Reinforce a small number of positively statedexpectations.
3 maximize academic engaged time
3. Maximize academic engaged time

The Effective Teacher

Teaches students not a subject or a grade level

Maximizes academic learning time

Has students earning their own achievement

Keeps the students actively engaged in learning

- Wong, 1998

wong the 4 kinds of time at school
Wong: The 4 kinds of time at school
  • Allocated Time 100%
    • Total time kids are in class
  • Instructional Time 90%
    • Total time you can observe a teacher teaching
  • Engaged Time 75%
    • Total time a student is involved in the learning
  • Academic learning time 35%
    • Time during which a student can demonstrate their learning.
maximize academic engaged time instruction influences behavior
Maximize Academic Engaged Time: Instruction Influences Behavior
  • Pacing
  • Opportunities for student responses
    • Acquisition vs Practice
  • Student feedback from teacher
  • Student choice
  • Sequence activities so preferred activities follow more demanding activities
  • Re-package it
4 establish a continuum of strategies to acknowledge appropriate behavior
4. Establish a continuum of strategies to acknowledge appropriate behavior.
  • Five instances of praise for every correction.
  • Begin each class period with a celebration.
  • Provide multiple paths to success/praise.
      • Group contingencies, personal contingencies, etc
increasing positive interactions
Increasing Positive Interactions
  • Use individual conferences to provide specific praise
  • “Search” for reinforceable behaviors
  • Reduce attention to misbehavior and increase time rewarding positive behaviors
  • Praise should be…

– contingent: occur immediately following

desired behavior

– specific: tell learner exactly what they are

doing correctly and continue to do in the

future

5 establish a continuum of strategies to respond to inappropriate behavior
5. Establish a continuum of strategies to respond to inappropriate behavior.
  • Apply consistently
  • Immediate feedback (when possible)
  • Plan consistent with school-wide plan
    • Define the school-wide “rule” for what is managed in the classroom and what is sent to the office
  • Consequence linked to context
  • Establish predictable consequences
  • Establish individual consequences AND group consequences
alpha vs beta commands
Alpha vs. Beta COMMANDS
  • Alphacommands are short and clear; neutral tone (e.g., “Stay on topic -- Columbus Day”)
  • Beta commands are wordy, vague and often convey a feeling of frustration (e.g., If you won’t listen, you won’t learn a darn thing. You aren’t trying. Pay attention and keep up”)

(Annemieke Golly)

resources on classroom management
Resources on Classroom Management
  • CHAMPs: A proactive and positive approach to classroom management
    • Sprick, R. Garrison, M., & Howard, L. (1998). Pacific Northwest Publishing.
  • Coaching Classroom Management: Strategies and Tolls for Administrators and Coaches
    • Sprick, R., Knight, J., Reinke, W.M., & McKale, T. (2006). Pacific Northwest Publishing.
classroom check up
Classroom Check-up
  • A consultation model designed to increase behavior management
    • Conduct observations
    • Assess critical classroom variables
    • Provide feedback
    • Collaboratively design individualized intervention plan
    • Teachers self-monitor/ and are receive ongoing feedback and support

(Reinke et al., 2008)

classroom check up observation form step 1
Classroom Check-Up Observation Form Step 1
  • Opportunities to respond
  • Correct academic responses
  • Disruptions
  • Ratio of Interactions
    • Specific praise
    • General praise
    • Reprimands
classroom check up observation form step 2
Classroom Check-Up Observation Form Step 2

For the next 5 minutes, focus on a different student every 5 seconds.

Record a “+” symbol to indicate on-task or engaged behavior and a “–” symbol to indicate off-task behavior. When each student has been observed, begin the progression again.

Continue until 5 minutes has elapsed.

slide43
Divide the number of on-task (+) marks by the total number of marks (60).

Time on task (academic engagement) =__________ percent.

44 /60 = 73%

ccu feedback form
CCU Feedback Form
  • Calculate your data/tallies
  • Fill into the feedback columns (by looking at the benchmarks)
  • Choose ONE goal!
  • Watch your students succeed!
  • A few notes
    • These are determined by ideal research conditions
    • Special education considerations
classroom management self assessment
ClassroomManagement: Self Assessment

Simonsen, Sugai, Fairbanks, & Briesch, 2006

http://www.pbis.org/pbis_resource_detail_page.aspx?Type=4&PBIS_ResourceID=174

resources
Resources
  • Coaching Classroom Management: Strategies and Tolls for Administrators and Coaches
    • Sprick, R., Knight, J., Reinke, W.M., & McKale, T. (2006). Pacific Northwest Publishing.
  • CHAMPs: A proactive and positive approach to classroom management
    • Sprick, R. Garrison, M., & Howard, L. (1998). Pacific Northwest Publishing.
    • Function Based Thinking: A systematic way of thinking about function and its impact on classroom behavior. Beyond Behavior (in press)
      • Hershfeldt, P.A., Rosenberg, M.S., & Bradshaw, C.P.
  • Good Behavior Game Implementation & Procedures Manual
    • Anderson, C,M. & Rodriguez, B.J.
ad