using picture books to teach literary terms in the high school english classroom l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Using Picture Books to Teach Literary Terms in the High School English Classroom PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Using Picture Books to Teach Literary Terms in the High School English Classroom

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 17

Using Picture Books to Teach Literary Terms in the High School English Classroom - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 464 Views
  • Uploaded on

Using Picture Books to Teach Literary Terms in the High School English Classroom. Bridget Robinson Department of Education University of North Carolina - Asheville. Research Question. Will the use of picture books to teach students literary elements affect student

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Using Picture Books to Teach Literary Terms in the High School English Classroom' - Mercy


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
using picture books to teach literary terms in the high school english classroom

Using Picture Books to Teach Literary Terms in the High School English Classroom

Bridget Robinson

Department of Education

University of North Carolina - Asheville

research question
Research Question

Will the use of picture books to teach

students literary elements affect student

understanding of and motivation to

read traditional literature as they apply

these literary elements to the works?

what is a picture book
What is a picture book?
  • Illustrations dominate each page
  • Text is placed neatly so that the book flows naturally from beginning to end
  • Typical length is 32 pages
  • Trim size of the book is markedly larger than that of the average novel
1999 national assessment of education
1999 National Assessment of Education
  • 50% of eighth graders read once a month or less for their own interest
  • 25% of fourth graders read once a month or less for their own interest
  • Cited in Darigan, Tunnell and Jacobs (2002)
schema theory and visual thinking
Schema Theory and Visual Thinking
  • Bruner (1990)
    • Using prior knowledge to organize information
  • Vacca and Vacca (2005)
    • Schema activation
    • Learning through direct experience
  • Arnheim (1969)
    • Pictorial thinking
engaged and disengaged readers
Engaged and Disengaged Readers
  • Engaged readers are intrinsically motivated and have a developed self-efficacy.
  • Disengaged readers read out of necessity. They read only because the work has been assigned to them.
  • Guthrie (2001)
subjects
Subjects
  • Urban high school in Western North Carolina
  • Two standard American Literature classes
  • 37 students
    • 23 males & 14 females
    • 4 students with special needs
    • 36 white students & 1 African-American students
    • Mixed socio-economic status
instruments
Qualitative

Pre-experiment survey

Post-experiment survey

Observations on student involvement

Quantitative

Pre-experiment literary term evaluative tool

Post-experiment literary term evaluative tool

Objective tests

Instruments
research design
Research Design
  • Pre-experiment literary terms evaluative tool
  • Pre-experiment survey
  • Traditional instruction
  • Objective Test 1
  • Picture Book Instruction
  • Objective Test 1 repeated
  • Traditional instruction
  • Objective Test 2
  • Picture Book Instruction
  • Objective Test 2 repeated
  • Post-experiment literary terms evaluative tool
  • Post-experiment survey
two major questions
Did the use of picture books increase student understanding of literary elements in more complex texts?

Did the use of picture books increase student engagement in literary material?

Two Major Questions
post experiment picture book questions
Post-experiment Picture Book Questions
  • Question Response
  • How did picture books affect 66% No affect
  • your interest in the material? 13% Decreased interest
  • 21% Increased interest
  • 2. How did picture books affect 31% No affect
  • your understanding of the material? 28% Decreased understanding
  • 41% Increased understanding
limitations of study
Limitations of Study
  • Repetition of Test
  • Time limit
  • Limited use of picture books
conclusions
Picture books help high school students better understand literary elements!

Picture books do not improve student engagement in reading

Picture books should be incorporated into the English classroom in various instructional methods

Conclusions
references
References
  • Arnheim, R. (1969). Visual thinking. Los Angeles: University of California Press.
  • Bruner, J. (1990). Acts of Meaning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Darigan, D. L., Tunnell, M. O., & Jacobs, J. S. (2002). Children’s literature: Engaging teachers and children in good books. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc
  • Guthrie, J. T. (2001). Contexts for engagement and motivation in reading. Retrieved October 10, 2006 from http://www.readingonline.org/articles/handbook/guthrie/index.html
  • Vacca, R. T. & Vacca, J.L. (2005). Content area reading: Literacy and learning acrossthe curriculum. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.