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Deployment Systems Navy

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    1. Deployment Systems (Navy)

    3. Shifting Paradigm Personnel Sourcing MTF specific Globally Sourced Mission Platform Centric Individual Augments Names to Billets BUMED NAVMED Regions Order Writing Navy Personnel Command Commands

    4. Mission Overview Predictable USMC EMF Kuwait & Djibouti JTF-Gitmo PrevMed Units Landstuhl

    5. Deployment Process Get advanced demand signal from planners Requirement validated by OPNAV BUMED tasks regions with specific requirement Regions put names to requirement 60+ days notice and adhere to SGs Rotation policy Navy Personnel Command will be writing most TAD/TDY orders

    6. Deployment Systems (Air Force)

    7. AFMS Posturing Methodology Challenge: Trained Current Extractable Solution: Optimize the use of large hospitals Constant Deployment Model: predictable and measurable Placement by Multiples of Five Better programmatic adjustments Enhancement of Medical Education and Training Our biggest challenge is to ensure we keep physicians trained and current in garrison. What the Air Force Medical Service has done as a result was to use our large hospitals in a constant deployer module. It allows continuity for the place and for the deployers. The smaller facilities are not saddled with deployments and trying to keep up patient access to care. Our biggest challenge is to ensure we keep physicians trained and current in garrison. What the Air Force Medical Service has done as a result was to use our large hospitals in a constant deployer module. It allows continuity for the place and for the deployers. The smaller facilities are not saddled with deployments and trying to keep up patient access to care.

    8. The medical service uses the same AEF construct as the line and it is based on a 20-month cycle. This design allows Each AEF will cycle each bucket pair (i.e., AEF 1 & 2) through a 4-month vulnerability window of time (in blue) for assigned assets/personnel tailored force packages of capability (requested by the COCOM) will deploy to meet the theater needs Following the deployment window is 1-month recovery period (in yellow). Then into 11-months of normal training and exercises (in green). Finally, the AEF enters into the 4-month ramp-up deployment preparation period (in gold) prior to the vulnerability period. While we strive for this and to use only folks in the bucket, it is sometimes difficult especially for low density high demand assets and when unexpected taskings come up. We will cover this more in our current challenges. The medical service uses the same AEF construct as the line and it is based on a 20-month cycle. This design allows Each AEF will cycle each bucket pair (i.e., AEF 1 & 2) through a 4-month vulnerability window of time (in blue) for assigned assets/personnel tailored force packages of capability (requested by the COCOM) will deploy to meet the theater needs Following the deployment window is 1-month recovery period (in yellow). Then into 11-months of normal training and exercises (in green). Finally, the AEF enters into the 4-month ramp-up deployment preparation period (in gold) prior to the vulnerability period. While we strive for this and to use only folks in the bucket, it is sometimes difficult especially for low density high demand assets and when unexpected taskings come up. We will cover this more in our current challenges.

    9. Each AEF Pair will have (Personnel UTC) Three EMEDS +25 (One builds to AFTH) Five EMEDS +10 Eight EMEDS Basic 9 BNBC and 6 Patient DECON 12 PAM +, SMEs w/IDMTsspokes AEF Capabilities This is what each of our pairs looks like. We have a medical rapid response force or MRFF in each AEF cycle for an CONUS crisis/contingency (I.e., Katrina). In addition we have the capability for 3 EMEDS +25, 5 =10s and eight EMEDS basic. In addition there are SOF medical assets and an EMEDS +25 in both PACOM and EUCOM as part of the quick reaction force. This is what each of our pairs looks like. We have a medical rapid response force or MRFF in each AEF cycle for an CONUS crisis/contingency (I.e., Katrina). In addition we have the capability for 3 EMEDS +25, 5 =10s and eight EMEDS basic. In addition there are SOF medical assets and an EMEDS +25 in both PACOM and EUCOM as part of the quick reaction force.

    10. Heres a better, more comprehensive overview of AFMS health service support NOTE: this is tailored, building-block support As the Threat and PAR (Population at Risk) increases over time so does our capabilities do to meet the increased needs (as shown here in the Red Wedge). An important point here, is the overlap of Levels of Care a result of the various teams and combinations of teams. This truly reflects the seamless health service support of the AFMS. Next, to makes things more clear of How the AFMS fits into the fight, lets review the building-block approach (using Force Modules) that the AFMS uses to support the war fighter. However, before I discuss that I want to bring up our greatest difficulty in making this happen. Heres a better, more comprehensive overview of AFMS health service support NOTE: this is tailored, building-block support As the Threat and PAR (Population at Risk) increases over time so does our capabilities do to meet the increased needs (as shown here in the Red Wedge). An important point here, is the overlap of Levels of Care a result of the various teams and combinations of teams. This truly reflects the seamless health service support of the AFMS. Next, to makes things more clear of How the AFMS fits into the fight, lets review the building-block approach (using Force Modules) that the AFMS uses to support the war fighter. However, before I discuss that I want to bring up our greatest difficulty in making this happen.

    11. We are still working the final numbers on this slide as I left to come here. This quarter we did have good news and we havent had any AF killed in action since 1 Apr 06. We have seen over 50,000 patients with 5,500 being inpatients. Of the total, about 2,000 were battle injuries. To support moving patients to the appropriate level of care, we have had 146 missions. One thing to note is the Army tries to leave folks in theater who dont need to come back to the states. As such, we have set up holding beds in theater at Balad to care for them. For instance, a patient may require a hernia repair which may be 2 weeks downtime. They dont have a mechanism nor does it make sense to have them lose their game face and go back to the US just to return back to the front. When the Army goes home, they usually dont return. As such, they needed a safe holding area for patients on con leave etc. We are still working the final numbers on this slide as I left to come here. This quarter we did have good news and we havent had any AF killed in action since 1 Apr 06. We have seen over 50,000 patients with 5,500 being inpatients. Of the total, about 2,000 were battle injuries. To support moving patients to the appropriate level of care, we have had 146 missions. One thing to note is the Army tries to leave folks in theater who dont need to come back to the states. As such, we have set up holding beds in theater at Balad to care for them. For instance, a patient may require a hernia repair which may be 2 weeks downtime. They dont have a mechanism nor does it make sense to have them lose their game face and go back to the US just to return back to the front. When the Army goes home, they usually dont return. As such, they needed a safe holding area for patients on con leave etc.

    12. Deployment Systems (Army)

    13. Deployable Personnel Authorized Medical Personnel Assigned Soldiers to deployable units (24/7) Required Personnel Professional Filler System (PROFIS) Medical Command (MEDCOM) Soldiers working in fixed facilities Attached for deployments Medical Augmentees Major Commands (MACOM) Tasked by Army G3

    14. What is PROFIS

    15. PROFIS Distribution

    16. What Is PDS? PROFIS Deployment System An automated system for MEDCOM to manage the PROFIS positions identified to deploy on a Time Phased Force Deployment List (TPFDL) using a Tiered approach for management and selection of Soldiers Identified, selected 6-8 months prior to OIF/OEF rotation PDS Tenants Equity, Predictability, Reliability, Stability PDS can be used for Contingency Operations Operation Katrina

    17. Why Is PDS Unique? Tiered Level Management & Selection Process MACOM Headquarters (Tier I) Regional Medical Command (Tier II) Medical Treatment Facility (Tier III) Consultant & Key Leadership Involvement Standby Pool for Unforecasted Requirements/MED AUG Tools for Selection Process Hazardous Fire Pay data (module) Automated Volunteer Program (module) Annual Tier I Sourcing Conference

    18. PROFIS Handbook Web Page: https://www.us.army.mil/suite/portal.do?$p=134645 Headquarters, USA MEDCOM ATTN: MCPE-MO 2050 Worth Road FT Sam Houston, Texas 78234-6000 (210) 221-7060/6741 DSN: 471 PROFIS Information & Resources