increasing independence for children with autism through visual supports n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Increasing Independence for Children with Autism through Visual Supports PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Increasing Independence for Children with Autism through Visual Supports

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 47

Increasing Independence for Children with Autism through Visual Supports - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 180 Views
  • Uploaded on

Increasing Independence for Children with Autism through Visual Supports. Presenters: Karen Burling, ASD Teacher Consultant Ellen Gehl, Speech-Language Pathologist. The Goal of Educational Programming for Students with ASD. Same as for any other student  FAPE and.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Increasing Independence for Children with Autism through Visual Supports' - Jimmy


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
increasing independence for children with autism through visual supports

Increasing Independence for Children with Autism through Visual Supports

Presenters:

Karen Burling, ASD Teacher Consultant

Ellen Gehl, Speech-Language Pathologist

the goal of educational programming for students with asd
The Goal of Educational Programming for Students with ASD
  • Same as for any other student  FAPE

and

  • Independent Functioning
  • Socialization Skills
auditory processing filtering
Auditory Processing/Filtering
  • Spelling Test
  • Discussion
oral expression discussion
Oral Expression Discussion
  • Dysnomia
  • Storage and Retrieval
  • Associative and Cognitive Tasks
  • Accommodations & Modifications are Necessary
appropriately supported means
Appropriately Supported Means

1. Consistent Behavioral Programming

2. A Functional Communication System

3. Visual Strategies

4. Team Problem Solving Approach

5. Peer to Peer Support

6. Paraprofessional Support

7. Academic Modifications/Accommodations

appropriately supported functional communication system
Appropriately Supported -Functional Communication System
  • Communication system has to be portable
  • Must be used consistently in every environment the student is in
  • Must be taught to the Student
visual communication systems
Visual Communication Systems
  • The items stay in the same place on the communication board
  • The colors remain the same if color coded
  • Continuous practice for the child
appropriately supported individualized visual strategies
Appropriately Supported - Individualized Visual Strategies
  • The visual strategies should bridge the barriers that are preventing the student with ASD from functioning independently within the general education setting
  • The visual strategies should be utilized in every setting the student is expected to transition from P.E. to assemblies
visual strategies development
Visual Strategies Development

1. Left/Right Orientation

2. Up/Down Orientation

3. Color/Number/Preferred Activities to Visually Orient to Environment

4. Pencil/Paper Skills to Visually Orient to Environment

5. Interest Areas to Associate Student with Schedule

visual strategy development
Visual Strategy Development

Visual Schedule

Utilizing Student’s Strengths

Utilize Students Predisposition

to Develop Visual Strategies

Impose Visual Structure on

Environment

Need for Order/Predictability

Visual Sequence of

Expectations

Color/Number/Preferred Activities

to Attach to the schedule

Visual Sequencing Promotes

Student Interaction with Schedule

Schedule must be Mobile using Clipboards or Folders

Impose Changes in Routines

through Visual Schedule

Creates Student Independence

within any Environment

Independence Prevents

Behavior in Students

example of a classroom visual schedule
Example of a Classroom Visual Schedule

Things to Do

All Done

Calendar

Centers

Snack

Carpet Time

Gross Motor

an example of a lunch choice visual system
An Example of a Lunch Choice Visual System

Lunch Choice A

Lunch Choice B

Lunch Choice C

an example of a recess visual schedule
An Example of a Recess Visual Schedule

Today is

Tuesday

At Recess Today I Will

1

2

3

an example of a visual schedule for gym

Things to Do

All Done

Put on Gym Shirt

Walk to Gym

Squad 3

Warm Ups

Jog Three Laps

An Example of a Visual Schedule for Gym
visual modalities everyone uses them
Visual Modalities – Everyone uses them
  • Visual Planners
  • Visual Schedules
  • Visuals for Transitions
  • Visual Organization for Specific Tasks
  • Visual Structure imposed on new or difficult environments
  • Visual Structure for organizing complex tasks
appropriately supported consistent behavioral programming
Appropriately Supported - Consistent Behavioral Programming
  • Systematic Response to Student Behavior
  • Ticket into the General Education Setting
  • Negotiation with General Education Teacher to Prevent Disruption within the Classroom
  • Consistent and Organized Response to Behavior
appropriately supported consistent behavioral programming1
Appropriately Supported - Consistent Behavioral Programming
  • Non-Punitive, Non-Verbal, Non-Emotional
  • Objective Criteria for the Students with ASD
  • Objective Criteria for the Staff
  • Time Away Area to Protect Dignity
  • Behavioral Change Sequence
slide24

A-B-C Paradigm

A B C Antecedent Behavior Consequence

Antecedent Strategies/ Setting Event Strategies

Teaching, Prompting, & Reinforcing Alternative Behaviors

Consequence (Reactive) Strategies

a b c antecedent behavior consequence
A B C Antecedent Behavior Consequence

Connor's A-B-C Paradigm

Not starting seat work

Not following directions

Increased verbalizations from adults

Responds to firm, adult redirection

Easily distracted by “stuff

a b c antecedent behavior consequence1
A B CAntecedent Behavior Consequence

Connor's A-B-C Paradigm

Visual schedule

Breaks

Sensory Diet

Visual timer

Token Strip

Social Stories

Fidget Box

Not starting seat work

Not following directions

Antecedent Strategies

a b c antecedent behavior consequence2
A B CAntecedent Behavior Consequence

Token Strip-5 tokens

Time Away—Room 145 5 minutes

Compliance Task

Problem Solving sheet

Visual schedule

Breaks

Sensory Diet

Visual timer

Token Strip

Social Stories

Fidget Box

Not starting seat work

Not following directions

slide28

Connor's A-B-C Paradigm (Finished Product)

A B C Antecedent Behavior Consequence

Increased verbalizations from adults

Responds to firm, adult redirection

Easily distracted by “stuff

Token Strip-

5 tokens

Time Away— Room 145 5 minutes

Compliance Task

Problem Solving sheet

Not starting seat work

Not following directions

Visual schedule

Breaks

Sensory Diet

Visual timer

Token Strip

Social Stories

Fidget Box

Antecedent Strategies

things to do all done

Schedule

Things To Do All Done

Put backpack

away

Lunch

choice

Draw

Centers

connor doesn t start seat work
Connor doesn’t start seat work

Pull the first token and provide Connor with a

Visual Reminder to start work.

wait 10 seconds for connor to respond
Wait 10 Seconds for Connor to respond

Connor continues to sit and not work.

Pull the second token and give Connor a physical

prompt to start work. Offer a break card.

wait 10 seconds for connor to respond1
Wait 10 Seconds for Connor to respond

Connor continues to not start work.

All of Connor's Tokens are removed.

Connor is unable to start his work and needs time away.

connor has a time away
Connor Has a Time Away

Connor's Time Away Area is a chair in room 145.

other examples of time away
Other Examples of Time Away
  • Chair in the Room
  • Chair in the Hallway
  • Designated Area in Room
  • Chair in Special Education Room
  • Support Staff Offices
  • Sensory Room
connor is quiet when the timer goes off
Connor is Quiet When the Timer Goes Off

Connor begins his compliance task at the compliance desk which is located right next to the time away chair.

Connor's compliance task is a 60 piece, 5 color sorting task.

other examples of compliance tasks
Other Examples of Compliance Tasks
  • Math Worksheet
  • Copying Spelling List
  • Word Search
  • Sorting Task
  • Coloring a Picture
  • Puzzle
connor completes his compliance task
Connor Completes His Compliance Task

Connor begins to fill out his Problem Solving Sheet at the same table he completed his compliance task.

connor completes his problem solving sheet
Connor Completes His Problem Solving Sheet

Connor returns to the next class/activity on his schedule with 3 Tokens.

sources for visuals
Sources for Visuals
  • Mayer Johnson Boardmaker-$$$$
  • Google Image search
  • usevisualstrategies.com
  • dotolearn.com some free, some pay
  • autism-visuals.com
  • pecs-usa.com $$