women owned horse farms a formula for success l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Women Owned Horse Farms: A Formula for Success PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Women Owned Horse Farms: A Formula for Success

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 33

Women Owned Horse Farms: A Formula for Success - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 591 Views
  • Uploaded on

Women Owned Horse Farms: A Formula for Success. Sandy Hamm, Research Associate University of Arkansas, Division of Agriculture Owner/Manager, Sandy Hamm Horses. Economic Impact. $102 Billion Industry $32 Billion Recreation 9.2 Million Horses 1.4 Million Jobs

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Women Owned Horse Farms: A Formula for Success


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Women Owned Horse Farms:A Formula for Success Sandy Hamm, Research Associate University of Arkansas, Division of Agriculture Owner/Manager, Sandy Hamm Horses

    2. EconomicImpact $102 Billion Industry $32 Billion Recreation 9.2 Million Horses 1.4 Million Jobs Source: American Horse Council, June 2005

    3. Why Horse Farming? • Agritourism - Horse Recreation industry generates $32 billion annually • Small Farm Advantage – acreage requirements are minimal • Urban Sprawl – Agritourism prospers with city growth

    4. Horse Farming Growth

    5. Agritourism Impact

    6. Agritourism – Horse Recreation

    7. Why Women Owned? • Women run farms increased 58% from1978 to 1997 (2002 census of Agriculture) • Historically women have operated small acreage livestock farms (ERS/USDA) • The overall increase in equine competition sports encourages women owned farms

    8. Women are Operating a Larger Share of U. S. Farms

    9. U.S. Farms with Women as Primary Operators

    10. Horse Farming What You Need to Know

    11. Initial Investment • Farmland • Quicken Books • Website www.sandyhammhorses.com • Equipment

    12. Financing • Business Plan • ‘A Must Have’ to secure financing • Strategic planning for horse business • Business goals • Lending entity

    13. Getting Started – Financing (Blue Ribbon Business)

    14. Farm Income – Deciding How to Specialize

    15. Boarding

    16. Boarding • Flourishes with urbanization • Small farm advantage • Who is your target customer? • Performance horse owner • Large initial investment • Stabling and limited turn-out, labor intense • Trail and pleasure horse owner • Content with paddocks and turn-out sheds • Happy to ride in meadows and on trails

    17. Boarding – What is Important • Contracts • Used to secure agreements • Nutrition • Know how to feed the different types of horses • Specialize in grouping horses • 3-4 in a pasture • All eat similar ration • Personalities • On sight caretaker

    18. Boarding – Average Monthly Costs

    19. Boarding - Rates

    20. Feed Rations – Performance Horse

    21. Hay Calculator

    22. Sales – Renewable Horses

    23. Sales & Marketing – Renewable Horses • Specialty Niche Market - Giving retired thoroughbred race horses a second career • Reaching Your Target Customer • Riding Lessons, Trail Rides • Club participation • Working Students

    24. Sales & Marketing – Renewable Horses • Advertising • Word of mouth • Website • U-tube (video) • Horse rental • Horse shows

    25. Breeding vs. Buying to Sell

    26. Breeding vs. Buying to Sell

    27. Riding Lessons

    28. Riding Lessons Useful Marketing Tool Lessons Buy Board

    29. Riding Lessons • Low-cost supplement to farm income • One lesson horse & schooling tack required • Your time • 1985 - $25/one hour • 2008 - $35/half hour • Tax deductions can apply • Equipment, feed, hay • Certifications available • Teaching and Training

    30. Summary • “Business success is based on 2 main criteria: Fair Prices and Good Service” (Horse Economics)

    31. Summary • Track daily costs • Monitor grain and hay prices closely • Adjust feeding rations when needed • If selling horses, watch break-even point • Be ready to drop price and sell • Stay on top of current farming practices and trends by attending classes and reading • Consult a tax accountant for savings tips

    32. References & Suggested Readings • O’Brien, Catherine E., “Horse Economics” • Olsen, Lisa Derby, “Blue Ribbon Business” • ERS/USDA “Amber Waves” , issues Sept. 2006 & Dec. 2007

    33. Women + Horses = Success!