GREATER NEW HAVEN PARTNERSHIP FOR A HEALTHY COMMUNITY - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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GREATER NEW HAVEN PARTNERSHIP FOR A HEALTHY COMMUNITY

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  1. GREATER NEW HAVEN PARTNERSHIP FOR A HEALTHY COMMUNITY --Household Survey Results-- Presented by: Holleran Consulting November 13, 1997

  2. METHODOLOGY • A total of 3340 randomly selected households in the study areas received a written, six-page survey on health-related conditions and behaviors, and access to health. A total of 1327 completed surveys was returned to Holleran Consulting as of October 20, 1997. In addition, 280 surveys were completed using a phone survey in areas where response to the written survey was low. The overall database of 1607 surveys represents a response rate of 48%. The sampling error for this study is +/-2.4% at the 95% confidence interval.

  3. LIMITATIONS OF THE DATA • Gender of respondents does match the census estimates; however, data have been weighted where appropriate to reflect census numbers. • Younger respondents age 20-29, homeless & illiterate/low education level individuals and developmentally disabled persons do not respond readily to health research of this nature. Other research methodologies traditionally work more effectively with these groups

  4. LIMITATIONS OF THE DATA • Adolescent health risk behavior is not accounted for in the household survey. The CDC’s Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey is recommended for this purpose. • Self-reported information often under-represents health risk behaviors and problems. The numbers contained within this report are best case scenarios. However, written surveys have proven to extract more accurate data than other research methods due to the fact that anonymity is perceived to be higher.

  5. SECTION I DEMOGRAPHICS

  6. Demographic Analysis of New HavenStudy Responses by Town

  7. Gender Census Match

  8. Race Census Match

  9. Are You A U.S. Citizen?

  10. Age Census Match

  11. Educational Attainment

  12. Income Census Match

  13. Is Income Adequate to Support Family?

  14. Employment Status

  15. Marital Status

  16. Housing Status

  17. Estimated Amount Spent on Housing

  18. Do You Have Health Insurance?

  19. I am currently receiving the following services:

  20. Do you or anyone in your household volunteer in your community?

  21. Section II Healthy People 2000 Goal Comparison & Major Findings

  22. How the Data Are Useful • Showing where our area falls short of national health goals (Healthy People 2000) • Pinpointing which target groups have the greatest health needs • Understanding the community’s perceptions about health and human services within the community

  23. What Are Healthy People 2000 Goals? • An initiative of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Healthy People 2000 is a national strategy for significantly improving the health of the nation by the year 2000. These objectives can serve as benchmarks as communities prioritize their most critical needs.

  24. HP 2000 Comparison Chart Improvement Needed

  25. Major Categories of Concern • Heart Disease & Related Lifestyle Choices • Cancer & Related Lifestyle Choices • Preventative Services • Access • Home & Car Safety • Mental Health • Crime & Violence

  26. Heart Disease • 7.5% of residents have already been diagnosed with heart disease • It runs in 33.8% of families

  27. Heart Disease Rate Comparisons • The three year* average mortality rate comparisons per 100,000 residents: • New Haven -- 333.9 • Connecticut -- 115 (base) • United States -- 135 (base) • Healthy People 2000 Goal -- 100.0 *For 1989-91 period

  28. Primary Lifestyle Choices Affecting Heart Condition • Smoking • Cholesterol Control • Weight Control • High blood pressure control • Aerobic exercise • Diabetes control

  29. Smoking • 18.6% smoke in New Haven; 22% nationally • 53.7% of these people do it to relieve stress • 26.6% tried to quit, but started smoking again • On average, these people smoke 1.1 packs a day • The average smoker is a 47 year old male and has an annual income of $23,000 • 70.7% of smokers do not have a college education • Average age started smoking was 17.6 • 41.1% use to smoke but don’t now • Methods used to quit smoking • Cold turkey -- 80.1% • Patch -- 4.8% • Nicotine gum -- 1.5% • Cessation Classes -- 4.8% • Support group -- 2.1% • Other -- 13.0%

  30. Cholesterol Control • 15.8% of respondents have high cholesterol • 49.1% have not had their cholesterol checked within the past 2 years • Persons with high cholesterol • Average age is 58 years old • 45.7% men; 54.3% women • 59.4% of females and 43.8% of males are overweight • 12.6% eat fast food 2 or more times per week

  31. Weight Control • 34.1% of males and 43.7% of females in New Haven are overweight according to the Body Mass Index

  32. Body Mass Index

  33. Blood Pressure Control • 24.8% currently have high blood pressure • 30.7% of adults in the study are have not been tested for high blood pressure with the past two years • 83% of those with high blood pressure aren’t taking adequate actions to control it. Persons with high blood pressure: • 11.5% rarely or never read food labels • 16.1% drink alcohol 3 or more times per week • 39.4% have not been to the doctor for a check-up within the last 6 months • 63.6% of females and 47.2% of males are overweight • 39.5% never exercise

  34. Aerobic Exercise • 31% never exercise • 23% exercise, but fewer than 3 times per week • 46% exercise 3 or more times per week

  35. Diabetes Control • 8.9% of survey respondents report having diabetes; 3% nationally • 97.2% of those with diabetes are not taking actions to control it • Persons with diabetes: • 27% have not been to a doctor for a check-up within the last 6 months • 24.8% drink alcohol 1 or more times per week • 58.5% of males and 70.4% of females with diabetes are overweight • 39.5% eat fast food more than once per week • 26.3% sometimes, rarely, or never read food labels • 60.8% have high blood pressure

  36. Cancer • Overall, 5.0% of survey respondents have been diagnosed with cancer

  37. Cancer Rate Comparisons • The three year* average mortality rate comparisons per 100,000 residents: • New Haven -- 199 • Connecticut -- 135.6 (base) • United States -- 132.8 (base) • Healthy People 2000 Goal -- 130.0 *For period 1989-91 period

  38. Primary Lifestyle Choices Affecting Cancer Rates • Diet • Smoking • Alcohol • Sun Exposure

  39. Diet • Daily intake of 5 servings of fruits and vegetables occurs among only 11.4% * of the population • 39.8% do not regularly read food labels • 5.9% eat fast food 3 or more times per week * Data has been weighted to gender

  40. Alcohol • 5.3% drink every day of the week • Of these, 18.6% consume 3 or more drinks within that day • 3.5% are chronic drinkers (60+ drinks per month) • 4.2% are binge drinkers at least once a week • In the last 6 months, 11.4% have been a passenger in a car driven by someone who had been drinking or taking drugs and 13.7% have driven a car after drinking alcohol • 3% have been treated at a drug or alcohol rehab program: of these, 82.9% have been clean (dry) since their release

  41. Sun Exposure • 1.9% report they have been diagnosed with skin cancer

  42. Preventative Services • The effectiveness of preventive services in reducing morbidity and premature mortality is well documented • Several prevalent forms of cancer can either be prevented or diagnosed early enough to prevent spread to other organs • Control of blood pressure will greatly reduce the risks of heart disease and stroke

  43. Incidence of Testing

  44. Access • 16.1% do not have a family or primary care doctor • 6.7% do not currently have insurance • 11% have not seen a doctor over the past 2 years • 11.2% have not seen the dentist over the past 2 years • 20.3% have been to the ER in the past year; of these, 31.9% have been more than once • 15.6% have been able to get health care needs due to: • 9% have financial barriers • 3.8% - can’t pay for services • 3.8% - no insurance • 2.1% - deductible is too high • 3.8% - insurance doesn’t cover • 1.4% - doctors won’t take their insurance • 2.3% -- can’t afford prescription medicine required • Other barriers • 1.3% - can’t get off from work • 1.9% - have to wait too long in doctor’s office • 1.6% - worry about quality of services • 9.3% have one barrier, 3.5% have two barriers, 2.8% have 3 or more barriers

  45. I get information about news in my community from:

  46. Home & Car Safety • 31.6% do not always wear a seat belt when they are a passenger or driver in a car, truck or van (HP 2000 goal = 15%) • 9.5% * have a handgun in the home/car/truck • 2.2% have multiple sex partners (of these 40% do not use condoms for protection against pregnancy and HIV) *Data has been weighted by gender

  47. Mental Health • 5.0% have clinical depression • 22.7% felt stressed 15 days or more in the past month • 8.4% * felt blue 15 days or more in the past month *Data has been weighted by gender

  48. Crime & Violence • 17.5% * do not often or always feel safe in their homes • 3.4% have been physically abused by another household member • Of those who are highly stressed, 17.8% relieve stress by taking it out on someone else • 26.5% have been the victims of crime, of these: • 62% have been victims of theft • 8.7% have been victims of assault • 33.5% have experienced property damage • 2.5% have been victims of stalking • 2.3% use street drugs • 7.5% have thought about attempting suicide in the past two years • 0.4% have actually attempted suicide in the past two years *Data has been weighted by gender

  49. Section III Special Populations

  50. Who Are the Special Populations Studied? • Families with children under 18 • Families with children (10-18) • Disadvantaged persons • Persons age 65+ • Disabled • Males • Females • High-stress individuals • African Americans • Hispanics • City of New Haven Residents