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MiBLSi

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    1. Discipline Referrals July 2010 Steve Goodman Michigans Integrated Behavior and Learning Support Initiative miblsi.cenmi.org Funded by Michigans Department of Education and OSEP

    3. Terminology 2-3 min This slide is placed here to provide clarification on what is meant by an office discipline referral. There is often the misconception that an office discipline referral is a consequence. While kids who misbehave are often sent to the office as a consequence, we need to spend a moment discussing the difference here. The fact that office and referral are included in the name is confusing. What SWIS helps us record and analyze are actually major behavioral incidents. We have some schools who only record an ODR when a student is actually sent to the office as the consequence. Some schools are not recording an ODR for instances where a student is asked to leave the classroom to go somewhere else (such as a reflection room) simply because the child is not being sent to the office. So when we consider what to record, we need to go back to the categories of problem behavior. Regardless of the consequence, when a student engages in one of the major problem behaviors we have defined as a staff, then we should be recording that behavioral incident. Many of our schools are also documenting minor problem behaviors because it allows for a more sensitive read on the problem behaviors in their school. Note that we do not require this. However, if you have very few major problem behavior referrals in your school, minors may help you monitor problem behavior more accurately for your school. 2-3 min This slide is placed here to provide clarification on what is meant by an office discipline referral. There is often the misconception that an office discipline referral is a consequence. While kids who misbehave are often sent to the office as a consequence, we need to spend a moment discussing the difference here. The fact that office and referral are included in the name is confusing. What SWIS helps us record and analyze are actually major behavioral incidents. We have some schools who only record an ODR when a student is actually sent to the office as the consequence. Some schools are not recording an ODR for instances where a student is asked to leave the classroom to go somewhere else (such as a reflection room) simply because the child is not being sent to the office. So when we consider what to record, we need to go back to the categories of problem behavior. Regardless of the consequence, when a student engages in one of the major problem behaviors we have defined as a staff, then we should be recording that behavioral incident. Many of our schools are also documenting minor problem behaviors because it allows for a more sensitive read on the problem behaviors in their school. Note that we do not require this. However, if you have very few major problem behavior referrals in your school, minors may help you monitor problem behavior more accurately for your school.

    4. Major Discipline Referral Caution Data reflects 3 factors: Students Staff members Office personnel Data reflects overt rule violators. Data is useful when implementation is consistent. Do staff and administration agree on office-managed problem behavior versus classroom-managed behavior? 3 minutes Data reflects 3 factors: Students: student behavior -Staff members: whether staff are completing the referral forms when students engage in a major problem behavior -office personnel: whether office staff (or whoever is in charge of entering SWIS data) are inputting data accurately, and how often data is being entered. Our SWIS data reflects overt rule violators. We want to keep this in mind and understand that there will still be children in need of social behavioral support whose needs are not captured by SWIS. Rob Horner has suggested that in addition to collecting SWIS data, we also get simple teacher nominations three times per year (teachers briefly identify students in their classroom for whom they have concerns about behaviorinternalizing or externalizing). Many multiple gating procedures (Systematic Screening for Behavior Disorders) start with this teacher nomination procedure.3 minutes Data reflects 3 factors: Students: student behavior -Staff members: whether staff are completing the referral forms when students engage in a major problem behavior -office personnel: whether office staff (or whoever is in charge of entering SWIS data) are inputting data accurately, and how often data is being entered. Our SWIS data reflects overt rule violators. We want to keep this in mind and understand that there will still be children in need of social behavioral support whose needs are not captured by SWIS. Rob Horner has suggested that in addition to collecting SWIS data, we also get simple teacher nominations three times per year (teachers briefly identify students in their classroom for whom they have concerns about behaviorinternalizing or externalizing). Many multiple gating procedures (Systematic Screening for Behavior Disorders) start with this teacher nomination procedure.

    5. Discipline Referral Processes Coherent system in place to collect major (office) discipline referral data Faculty and staff agree on categories Faculty and staff agree on process Office Discipline Referral Form includes specific information Name, date, time Staff Problem Behavior Location

    6. Sample Office Discipline Referral Form

    7. Major Discipline Offenses Major behavior incidents include any behavior that places self-or others at physical risk prevents the on-going delivery of instruction violates a school rule/expectation. May require being sent to the office or additional help to address behavior

    8. Minor Discipline Offenses "Minor" events are behaviors that can be redirected quickly without disrupting the flow of instruction or school activity, do not require the direct contact with the office, and if performed infrequently would not be considered a problem.

    9. Major vs. Minor Travis always calls Amanda "Amanda Panda" and he has a crush on her. Amanda hates this name and complains about it.

    10. Major vs. Minor (cont.) Ramone continues to call Latisha a disrespectful name despite being reminded of the respectful expectations several times, and begins to call the her home nightly despite being asked not to.

    11. Not all problem behavior is of the same severity. This slide should just be a quick glance. Each of these are spelled out more in later slides.Not all problem behavior is of the same severity. This slide should just be a quick glance. Each of these are spelled out more in later slides.

    12. Categorizing Problem Behavior Inappropriate Language Arson Bomb Threat/False Alarm Defiance/Disrespect Disruption Dress Code Violation Fighting/Physical Aggression Forgery/Theft Gang Affiliation Display Harassment/Bullying Inappropriate Display of Affection Inappropriate Location Lying/Cheating These categories are based on federal guidelines. Trainers: do not read through the whole list. Just show it and tell them that all of these categories will be available in the SWIS system, but that they do not need to include all of these categories on their referral formonly the ones that they think will actually apply for their students.These categories are based on federal guidelines. Trainers: do not read through the whole list. Just show it and tell them that all of these categories will be available in the SWIS system, but that they do not need to include all of these categories on their referral formonly the ones that they think will actually apply for their students.

    13. Discipline Categories Exercise

    14. How could you use this activity or a similar one with your staff?How could you use this activity or a similar one with your staff?

    15. Using Data to Build Solutions Prevention: How can we avoid the problem context? Who, When, Where Schedule change, curriculum change, etc Teaching: How can we define, teach, and monitor what we want? Teach appropriate behavior Use problem behavior as negative example Recognition: How can we build in systematic reward for desired behavior? Extinction: How can we prevent problem behavior from being rewarded? Consequences: What are efficient, consistent consequences for problem behavior? How will we collect and use data to evaluate (a) implementation fidelity, and (b) impact on student outcomes? Designing Solutions If many students are making the same mistake it typically is the system that needs to change not the students. Teach, monitor and reward before relying on punishment. Designing Solutions If many students are making the same mistake it typically is the system that needs to change not the students. Teach, monitor and reward before relying on punishment.

    16. Designing Solutions If many students are making the same mistake it typically is the system that needs to change not the students. Teach, monitor and reward before relying on punishment.