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Logic Model for Youth Substance Abuse & Use Prevention Programs in OAS Member States. September 14, 2005 Ottawa, Ontario Wanda Jamieson & Tullio Caputo. Logic Model Overview. What is a logic model? It’s a picture of how a program works. It can take many forms.

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logic model for youth substance abuse use prevention programs in oas member states

Logic Model for Youth Substance Abuse & Use Prevention Programs in OAS Member States

September 14, 2005

Ottawa, Ontario

Wanda Jamieson & Tullio Caputo

logic model overview
Logic Model Overview
  • What is a logic model?
    • It’s a picture of how a program works.
    • It can take many forms.
    • It is useful to validate the theory of change of a program.
  • Why develop a logic model?
    • It can help OAS Member States to strategically focus their prevention efforts; learn more about how their programs work & make continuous improvements.
    • Its value “is in the process of creating, validating, and then modifying the model.”W.K. Kellogg Foundation (1998) http://www.wkkf.org.
key results of literature review
Key Results of Literature Review
  • What we did:
    • Review of literature published since 2002, to focus on identifying objectives, activities, expected outcomes, challenges, & performance indicators and best practices in measuring youth substance abuse prevention.
    • Narrowed search to 30 key articles, including 24 meta-analyses.
  • What we learned:
    • There is greater demand for evidence-based approaches, yet few programs are designed & evaluated according to basic evaluation/scientific standards
    • Evaluation challenges include limited evaluation research/technical capacity, program fidelity & adaptation, site recruitment, diversity of youth population, participant retention, lack of tested outcome measures.
    • It is possible to conceptualize a model of prevention (universal, selective & indicated prevention) and to identify anticipated outcomes.
ultimate outcomes
Ultimate Outcomes
  • The Prevention of Youth Substance Use and Abuse contributes to the following Ultimate Outcomes:
    • Reduction in demand for illicit drugs and harmful substance by youth &
    • Reduction in the health, social and economic costs associated with substance use/abuse among youth.
  • Assumptions:
    • Programs that focus on a combination of information, education and cognitive and behavioural skills training, and which use interactive delivery methods are likely to be more effective.
    • Effective prevention is a work in progress. Further research is required to fully develop theories of youth substance use/abuse and rigorous evaluation is needed to determine what type or combination of prevention works best and for whom.
universal prevention
Universal Prevention
  • Activities include:
    • Educating & raising awareness of use and abuse and its consequences; promoting healthy lifestyle choices & behaviours, building social competence
  • Outputs:
    • Many are school or classroom based programs or promotional campaigns and may be linked to other healthy lifestyle initiatives
  • Reach:
    • General youth population
  • Immediate Outcomes:
    • Increase in knowledge & awareness of use/abuse & consequences
    • Enhanced capacity to make informed, healthy decisions
  • Longer-term Outcomes (both intermediate and ultimate):
    • Provides a base contribution to intermediate and longer-term outcomes
selective prevention
Selective Prevention
  • Activities include:
    • Some activities similar to universal prevention.
    • Greater emphasis on creating opportunities for healthy lifestyle choices; motivating positive change & teaching cognitive/behavioural skills e.g. refusal/resistance.
  • Outputs include:
    • School and community-based programs in settings populated by youth at risk
    • Links with related services to engage and reach out to youth; strengthen family support and involve youth in alternative activities (leisure)
  • Reach:
    • Youth at risk population
  • Immediate Outcomes:
    • Increase in knowledge & awareness of use/abuse & consequences
    • Enhanced capacity to make informed, healthy decisions
    • Increased knowledge of healthy alternatives
    • Prevented/delayed onset of regular use
  • Longer-term Outcomes (both intermediate and ultimate):
    • Provides a base of knowledge, skills and potentially behavioural change which will contribute to intermediate and longer-term outcomes
indicated prevention
Indicated Prevention
  • Activities include:
    • Some activities similar to universal prevention & indicated prevention.
    • Greater intensity and targeting of activities to create opportunities for healthy lifestyle choices & behaviours; motivate positive change & teach cognitive/behavioural skills to influence thinking and behaviour
  • Outputs include:
    • School and community-based programs
    • Motivational interventions (e.g. with youth who have been apprehended using substances);
    • Links with related services to engage and reach out to youth
    • Family support, including skills training/therapy
    • Alternative activities (leisure)
  • Reach:
    • Youth at risk of regular/heavy use of dependency
  • Immediate Outcomes:
    • Increase in knowledge & awareness of use/abuse & consequences
    • Enhanced capacity to make informed, healthy decisions
    • Increased knowledge of healthy alternatives
    • Prevented/delayed onset of regular use
  • Longer-term Outcomes (both intermediate and ultimate):
    • Provides a base of knowledge, skills and potentially behavioural change which will contribute to intermediate and longer-term outcomes
research evaluation
Research & Evaluation
  • Activities include:
    • Undertaking research studies
    • Developing theories and concepts about substance use/abuse prevention
    • Monitoring program performance
    • Undertaking evaluations
    • Undertaking program reviews, meta-analyses to determine what works.
  • Outputs include:
    • Research documents (e.g. on substance use/abuse patterns)
    • Theories and conceptual frameworks about youth substance use/abuse and its prevention
    • Evaluation documents (e.g. logic models, frameworks, plans, studies)
    • Promising/best practices
    • Recommendations for ministerial and legislative bodies
  • Reach:
    • Program Developers, Practitioners and Decision Makers
  • Immediate Outcomes:
    • Increased knowledge base on effective prevention
    • Dissemination and update of promising and best practices
  • Longer-term Outcomes (both intermediate and ultimate):
    • Provides a base of knowledge, skills and potentially behavioural change which will contribute to intermediate and longer-term outcomes