Motorcycle Safety Training for Injury Prevention Professionals - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Motorcycle Safety Training for Injury Prevention Professionals
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Motorcycle Safety Training for Injury Prevention Professionals

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  1. Motorcycle Safety Trainingfor Injury Prevention Professionals February 12, 2009 A.D. Farrow Co. Harley Davidson Shop at NorthStar

  2. APHA – Public Health Traffic Safety Institute Grant Motorcycle Safety: • Goal #1: Conduct a training for the Ohio injury prevention community about motorcycles and motorcycle safety. • Goal #2: Educate the re-entry riding community about the necessity of proper riding training. • Goal #3: Promote “Sharing the Road” among Franklin County motorists.

  3. Thank you • American Public Health Association • AD Farrow • American Motorcyclist Association • Columbus Biker • Franklin County Safe Communities, Columbus Public Health • Grant Medical Center, Trauma Program • Speakers • Safety gear displayers

  4. Material • Agenda • Evaluation – pre & post • Resource Guide – CD • Material from Motorcycle Ohio

  5. Who’s in the room?

  6. The Motorcycling Community

  7. Motorcycle Stereotypes • People ride motorcycle just to get attention. • Motorcyclists wear black leather to look “cool.” • Motorcyclists are only a small percentage of registered vehicles, thus motorcycle crashes represent a small burden to society. • Most motorcyclists drink and ride. • Most motorcyclists are older with unkept ponytails. • Motorcyclists are law breakers.

  8. Who Rides? More and more people are riding motorcycles with each year… • Motorcycles are more mainstream than ever. • The number registered motorcycles increases each year in Ohio. • The number of motorcycle endorsements increases each year in Ohio.

  9. Who Rides? The profile of the motorcycle community is changing and becoming more diverse. According to a 2004 New Motorcycle Owners Survey: • People of all ages, professions and races ride, and ride for many different reasons. • Women are becoming a larger part of the motorcycling community.

  10. Who Rides? • The median household income of motorcycle owners exceeds that of the US average. • More than half of motorcycle owners are married. • 29% of today's riders have college degrees, compared to 23% in1998. • More motorcyclists today work “white collar” jobs.

  11. Who Rides? More middle aged former motorcyclist are returning to riding: • Between 2005 and 2007: • The number of motorcyclists 50 years of age or older increased by 11%. • The number of motorcyclists 49 years of age or younger decreased by 5%. • Part of this increase can be attributed to the return of the re-entry rider.

  12. Re-entry Riders Re-entry rider – a motorcyclist who is returning to riding after an extended break from riding. • Also know as “returnees.” • Who are re-entry riders? Parents, professionals, retirees, husbands, wives… • Generally between 40 and 55 years of age.

  13. Re-entry Riders Re-entry riders are an important motorcycle safety audience: • More likely to be involved in an injury or fatal crash. • From 2004 – 2007, a greater percentage of motorcyclists between ages 41 and 55 were involved in fatal or injury crashes than any other age group in Ohio, second to 21-25 years of age.

  14. Re-entry Riders Re-entry riders are more likely to be involved in an injury or fatal crash • The largest age group represented among motorcycle related trauma patients* was 41-55 years-old, the age group where re-entry riders tend to fall. • Nationally, the percentage of motorcyclists involved in alcohol related fatal chases was highest in ages 45-49 (41%), followed by 40-44 (37%) and 35-39 (35%). *2007 Grant Medical Center Trauma Patients

  15. Questions?

  16. Enjoy the rest of the day.