The progressives and their networks
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The Progressives and Their Networks. ( Getting by with a Little Help from Your Friends). Who were the Progressives?. Age : Born between 1860 and 1880 Class: Middle-class origins Hard work Self-Discipline Individual Ethic Education Race: Mostly White. Why dissatisfied?.

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The Progressives and Their Networks

(Getting by with a Little Help from Your Friends)


Who were the Progressives?

  • Age: Born between 1860 and 1880

  • Class: Middle-class origins

    • Hard work

    • Self-Discipline

    • Individual Ethic

    • Education

  • Race: Mostly White


  • Why dissatisfied?

    • Series of economic panics 1870-1890

    • Labor unrest

    • Flood of immigrants

    • Changes from industrialization, new technologies


    What’s the solution?

    • “Association”

    • “Social Solidarity”

    • Activist Government


    JaneAddamsThe Hull House Hub


    Addams Biographical


    Founding of Hull House

    1889


    Hull House Growth


    Early Residents

    • Julia Lathrop (1858-1932)—Moves to Hull House in 1890.

    • Mary Kenney (1864-1943)—Moves to Hull House circa 1890.

    • Florence Kelley (1859-1932)—Moves to Hull House in 1891.


    Julia Lathrop


    Julia Lathrop

    • 1893: Charities investigator

    • Pioneer in “applied sociology”

    • Chicago School

    • Immigrants’ Protective League

    • 1912: First head of federal Children’s Bureau

    • Other issues: suffrage


    Florence Kelley


    Florence Kelley

    • Investigated sweatshop conditions; report led to new IL laws

    • 1893: Appointed chief factory inspector

    • 1899: Head of National Consumers’ League; moves into Henry Street Settlement in New York City

    • 1912: Work on child labor instrumental in creation of Children’s Bureau

    • Other issues: suffrage, NAACP


    Mary Kenney

    • Unusual background

    • 1892: first salaried organizer for AFL

    • Worked with Kelley on labor issues

    • Influential in founding of WTUL; suffragist


    Later Residents

    • Alice Hamilton (1869-1970)– Hull House 1897

    • Mary McDowell (1854-1936)- Hull House 1890s

    • Sophonisba Breckinridge (1866-1948)—Hull House 1907


    Alice Hamilton

    • 1893: MD from U Michigan

    • 1897: Professor at Northwestern; Hull House

    • Expert on industrial poisons

    • 1919: first woman on Harvard Medical School faculty


    Alice Hamilton

    1869-1970


    Mary McDowell

    • 1854-1936

    • Founded settlement house by stockyards with JA help

    • Co-founder WTUL

    • Woman suffrage

    • Women’s Peace Party


    Sophonisba Breckinridge

    • First woman to receive Ph.D. in political science (U Chicago) in 1901

    • WTUL drew to Hull House

    • Succeeded Lathrop as head of Chicago School research department

    • Founded Immigrants’ Protective League with Lathrop

    • NAWSA leader

    • Women’s Peace Party

    1866-1948


    Edith Abbott

    • 1876-1957

    • U Chicago Ph.D. 1905

    • Hull House resident 1908-1920

    • Pioneering social research on working women and juvenile delinquency


    Grace Abbott

    • 1878-1939

    • Master’s, Political Science,

    • U Chicago 1909

    • Hull House, 1908-1920(?)

    • 1908: Immigrants’ Protective League

    • 1910-1917: Chicago School of Civics

    • 1917: Children’s Bureau


    Univ. Chicago Allies

    W. I. Thomas (1983-1947)

    John Dewey (1859-1952)


    New York City Allies

    Lillian Wald, pioneer in public health nursing (1867-1940)


    New York City Allies

    1908, New York City

    Lavinia Dock (1858-1956)


    Networks Emerge

    • Organizations:

    • Chicago School/U Chicago

    • NY School of Philanthropy

    • Other settlement houses in Chic and NYC

    • Immigrants’ Protective League

    • WTUL (1903)

    • Children’s Bureau (1912)

    • NAWSA /NWP

    • Issues:

    • Immigrant abuse

    • Women’s work hours

    • Child labor/welfare

    • Public health

    • Woman suffrage

    • Peace

    Hull House


    Networking


    Networking


    W.E.B. DuBois:The NAACP Hub


    DuBois Biographical

    1907


    The Philadelphia Negro


    DuBois and Hull House

    • Visitor, 1903-1918

    • Correspondence with Addams, Kelley, Lathrop

    • Joint publications in journals


    The Niagara Movement

    1907

    1905 ►


    Call for Civil Rights

    • “The Call” February 1909 signed by:

    • Jane Addams

    • John Dewey

    • W.E.B. DuBois

    • Florence Kelley

    • Mary McDowell

    • W.I. Thomas

    • William English Walling

    • Ida B. Wells-Barnett among 60 total


    NAACP founded 1909

    Walling

    Wells-Barnett

    Ovington


    Connections Continue


    NAWSA:The Suffrage Hub


    NAWSA Roles

    • Vice-Presidents of NAWSA include:

    • Jane Addams

    • Florence Kelley

    • Sophonisba Breckinridge

    • Madeleine McDowell Breckinridge

    • Active Members/Supporters:

    • Mary Kenney O’Sullivan

    • Mary White Ovington

    • W. E. B. DuBois

    • Oswald Garrison Villard

    • Mary Church Terrell

    Madeleine McDowell Breckinridge


    Suffrage Networking

    Suffrage Parade, NYC, 1912


    Suffrage Networking

    NAWSA Convention circa 1917


    Suffrage Networking


    Making the Connection

    Alice Paul with NAWSA members

    Alice Paul (1885-1977) in 1913


    National Woman’s Party

    1913 NAWSA Parade


    National Woman’s Party

    1917: Picketing/Arrests/Jail


    The Women's Peace Party:The Anti-War Hub


    Response to War

    • Founding WPP members include:

    • Jane Addams

    • Florence Kelley

    • Lillian Wald

    • Mary McDowell

    • Edith and Grace Abbott

    • Sophonisba Breckinridge

    • Julia Lathrop

    • Alice Hamilton

    • Anna Howard Shaw (NAWSA)

    • Carrie Chapman Catt (NAWSA)

    • Crystal Eastman (NAWSA/NWP)


    Founding Meeting

    January 10, 1915


    Only the Beginning

    Settlement house work

    Poverty issuesAnti-war

    Immigrant welfarePublic Health

    Child labor Woman suffrage

    Child welfare Women workers


    Networks Continue

    Frances Perkins


    Classroom Activities

    • Biographies/Autobiographies: Examine which women/men have received more/less attention and discuss why

    • Choose a group of Progressives and trace the connections among them of age, class, race, issues, and organizations; create posters showing the network

    • Choose an issue/event and investigate the networks

    • Prepare a dialogue showing how people networked around issues


    Questions?


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