Outlines of these slides may be viewed at
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 18

Outlines of these slides may be viewed at creighton/~eeselk PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 72 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Outlines of these slides may be viewed at www.creighton.edu/~eeselk or people.ceighton.edu/~ees33175 Choose this course and follow the links.

Download Presentation

Outlines of these slides may be viewed at creighton/~eeselk

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Outlines of these slides may be viewed at creighton eeselk

  • Outlines of these slides may be viewed at

  • www.creighton.edu/~eeselk

    • or people.ceighton.edu/~ees33175

  • Choose this course and follow the links.

  • I highly recommend that you print the outlines of the slides before each class & then use your printed copy for filling in notes of the classroom discussion.

general introduction - 1


General introduction

General introduction

  • 1. Why philosophy at Creighton?

    • A distinctive feature of Jesuit, Catholic higher education:

    • (1) addressing ultimate questions &

    • (2) doing so from two viewpoints

      • revelation

      • critical reason

  • with the goal of?

general introduction - 2


General introduction1

General introduction

  • Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556) established this as one of the distinctive goals of the universities he founded.

    • Ignatius assumed that these two perspectives are harmonious

general introduction - 3


General introduction2

General introduction

  • 2. The two principal parts of the course:

    • Historical - will study some classics

      • What is the value of studying classics?

    • Problems

      • What problems will we cover in this course?

general introduction - 4


General introduction3

General introduction

  • (1)the legitimacy of the state

  • (2)justice

  • (3) civil disobedience

  • (4)existence of God

  • (5)theories of truth

  • (6) liberty & its bounds

  • (7)choice vs knowledge

  • (8)cognitive, ethical, & aesthetic relativism

general introduction - 5


General introduction4

General introduction

  • 3. The nature of philosophy

    • 7 traits

    • (1) Types of issues are very general & very fundamental

      • e.g., truth

        • morality

        • foundations of knowledge

        • limits of liberty

        • existence of God

        • See Blackburn’s list on p. 3

general introduction - 6


General introduction5

General introduction

  • (2) Is critical

    • in the sense that philosophy raises questions, very basic questions

    • quote from Stuart Hampshire

    • Socrates in the Apology compares himself to a fly buzzing around a lethargic horse.

general introduction - 7


General introduction6

General introduction

general introduction - 8


General introduction7

General introduction

  • "Almost all the philosophers who have survived and are still read were to some degree subversive and unsettling, loosening the hold of accepted categories and habits of classification, and suggesting a scheme of description of their own design. This radical resistance to the usual certainties, and particularly to the usual pictures of the mind, is the beginning of philosophy. . . .”

general introduction - 9


General introduction8

General introduction

  • “After all, our adherence to customary categories and classifications are largely a result of family inheritance. It is a contingency of birth. Thus at a certain stage in our lives it seems proper to leave our familiar home and look the strange clothing that will fit a deviant and unsocialized consciousness." (Stuart Hampshire, "Philosophy and Fantasy," NYRB, 26 Sep. 1968: 51.f)

general introduction - 10


General introduction9

General introduction

  • (3) Philosophy is integrative

    • attempts to build grand visions of human life and the world which include all dimensions

  • (4) The method of philosophy

    • argumentation

    • empirical vs conceptual questions (Blackburn 3)

    • Blackburn’s notion of philosophy as “conceptual engineering” (2)

  • general introduction - 11


    General introduction10

    General introduction

    • (5) Philosophy is primarily reflective rather than practical

      • Philosophy “bakes no bread”

      • So why study philosophy or any subject which bakes no bread?

      • The “high ground” reply (Blackburn 6)

        • Philosophy seeks answers to big questions because it wants to understand. It seeks knowledge for its own sake rather than for utility.

    general introduction - 12


    General introduction11

    General introduction

    • The “middle-ground reply” (Blackburn 7)

      • Reflection is continuous with practice, and practice can get worse or better depending on the soundness of our reflections.

    general introduction - 13


    General introduction12

    General introduction

    • The “low-ground” reply (Blackburn 10)

      • Continuation of point made in middle-ground reply but brought to the level of life & death.

      • Ideas about rights, the value of other persons affect how we treat others. “In the end, it is ideas for which people kill each other” (Blackburn 11).

    general introduction - 14


    General introduction13

    General introduction

    • (6) The history of philosophy is an essential part of doing philosophy

      • This is true of all of the humanities

      • Why?

    general introduction - 15


    General introduction14

    General introduction

    • (7) The similarities & differences between philosophy and theology

      • Similarity  both are concerned with big and fundamental questions (e.g., the existence of God, meaning of human life, ultimate destiny).

      • Difference  but philosophy & theology approach these questions from different perspectives: reason & revelation.

    general introduction - 16


    General introduction15

    General introduction

    • Difference  some branches of theology, especially systematic theology, are parasitic with respect to philosophy. The reverse does not seem to be the case.

    general introduction - 17


    General introduction16

    General introduction

    • 4. The areas (sub-disciplines) of philosophy

      • (1) Epistemology

      • (2) Metaphysics

      • (3) Ethics

      • (4) Logic

      • (5) Philosophy of studies

      • (6) Historical studies

    general introduction - 18


  • Login