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UWF WRITING LAB RULES OF THUMB FOR COMMA USAGE. from Real Good Grammar, Too by Mamie Webb Hixon. NOTE: Comp I students are responsible for only the rules covered on the first two slides. USE A COMMA:. with a coordinating conjunction to connect two independent clauses.

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UWF WRITING LAB RULES OF THUMB FOR COMMA USAGE

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Uwf writing lab rules of thumb for comma usage

UWF WRITING LAB RULES OF THUMB FOR COMMA USAGE

from Real Good Grammar, Too

by Mamie Webb Hixon

NOTE: Comp I students are responsible for only the rules covered on the first two slides.

Created by April Turner


Use a comma

USE A COMMA:

  • with a coordinating conjunction to connect two independent clauses.

  • Betty is the homecoming queen, and Bill is the king.

  • to separate introductory phrases, words, or clauses from the main part of the sentence.

  • After the Vietnam War ended, a number of veterans were hospitalized.


Use a comma1

USE A COMMA:

  • to separate nonrestrictive clauses, phrases, and appositives from the rest of the sentence.

  • The scout leader, overweight and out of shape, trudged up the hill.

  • DO NOT set off restrictive information with commas .

  • Twain’s novel Huckleberry Finn is on the censored list.


Use a comma2

USE A COMMA:

  • to separate direct quotations from the phrase identifying the speaker.

  • John said, "The fishing is great in Bear Lake.“

  • to separate the names of smaller geographic units from the names of larger units.

  • Denver, Colorado, is called the Mile High City.


Use a comma3

USE A COMMA:

  • to separate items in a date. Omit the comma when just the month and year or month and day are given.

  • Kennedy was assassinated November 22, 1963, in Dallas, Texas.

  • to separate names of titles or degrees that follow the name.

  • Harold Johnson, Ph.D., will speak in the Commons on Tuesday.


Use a comma4

USE A COMMA:

  • to separate short, tightly, interrelated clauses in a series.

  • John phoned, Mary stopped by, and Phil left a message.

  • to mark allowable omissions of repeated words, especially verbs.

  • Your analysis is superb; your execution, appalling.


Use a comma5

USE A COMMA:

  • to provide clarity and prevent misreading, even if none of the other rules apply.

  • We left him, assured that he would fail.

  • (We were sure that he would fail.)

  • We left him assured that he would fail.

  • (He was sure that he would fail.)

  • to separate three or more items or phrases in a series.

  • Golfing, swimming, and bowling are my favorite activities.


Use a comma6

USE A COMMA:

  • to separate a series of two or more adjectives not connected by a conjunction if the order of the adjectives can be reversed and still retain the same meaning.

  • Your friend is a clever, sensitive person.

  • to separate interrupters or parenthetical and transitional words from the rest of the sentence.

  • Most of them, however, do try to act friendly and courteous.


Use a comma7

USE A COMMA:

  • to separate contradictory phrases from the rest of the sentence.

  • It was Betty, not Joan, who was elected queen of the prom.

  • to separate names used in direct address or other isolates such as yes, no, and thank you from the rest of the sentence.

  • Tell me, John, did you vote for Joan?

  • No, I am not voting for myself.


Use a comma8

USE A COMMA:

  • to separate tag questions from the rest of the sentence.

  • You did that on purpose, didn't you?

  • to separate words and abbreviations that introduce an example or an illustration, including namely, that is, towit, i.e., e.g., for example, and for instance.

  • Many of my friends, for example, Fred, Dean, and Pete, like to golf.


Questions and answers

Questions and Answers

  • Does anyone have a question about the rules of comma usage?

  • PLEASE ASK!!!


Let s practice

LET’S PRACTICE!!!

  • I have told one million lies in my life and that is the Gospel truth.

  • …life, and that…

  • As a child I was the kind of kid my mother told me not to play with.

  • As a child, I was…

  • Denver which is the capital of Colorado has an altitude of one mile.

  • Denver, which is the capital of Colorado, has…

  • The city which is the capital of Colorado has an altitude of one mile.

  • No commas (restrictive)


Let s practice a little more

LET’S PRACTICE A LITTLE MORE!!!

  • Linda asked “Do you think she’ll ever speak to him again?”

  • Linda asked, “Do you…

  • Paxton Florida is the home of the mighty Bobcats.

  • Paxton, Florida, is the…

  • The No Child Left Behind Act was signed in on January 2 2002.

  • …January 2, 2002.

  • July 1990 is the date for the Progress “90” celebration.

  • No comma (2 items in the date)


Let s keep going

LET’S KEEP GOING!!!

  • The commencement speaker was Juliet Brown Ph.D.

  • …Juliet Brown, Ph.D.

  • He shot pool he drank Anchor Steam beer and he rarely went home.

  • He shot pool, he drank Anchor Steam beer, and he rarely went home.

  • To the winners we give prizes; to the losers consolation; and to the spectators a good show.

  • …to the loser, consolation; and to the spectators, a good show.


Almost there

ALMOST THERE!!!

  • The morning after a policeman came to the door.

  • The morning after, a policeman…

  • Jeff collected a change of clothing shoes and golf gear before he set off for the day.

  • …a change of clothing, shoes, and golf gear…

  • A large green bug settled on the torn autumn leaf.

  • A large, green bug…


We re in the home stretch

WE’RE IN THE HOME STRETCH!!!

  • The order however was not filled that day.

  • The order, however, was not…

  • Pneumonia begins with a p not an n.

  • …with a p, not an n.

  • Thank you Susan.

  • Thank you, Susan.


Last ones

LAST ONES!!!

  • You’re going aren’t you?

  • You’re going, aren’t you?

  • Many of my friends for example Rachel, Jennifer, and Allen, enjoy going to the movies.

  • Many of my friends, for example, Rachel,…


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