Uwf writing lab rules of thumb for adjective and adverb use
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UWF WRITING LAB RULES OF THUMB FOR ADJECTIVE AND ADVERB USE. From Real Good Grammar, Too by Mamie Webb Hixon. SPEAKER 1: How are you today? Which respondent are you? SPEAKER 2: I’m good. SPEAKER 3: I’m well. SPEAKER 1: How are you today? Which respondent are you?

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UWF WRITING LAB RULES OF THUMB FOR ADJECTIVE AND ADVERB USE

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Uwf writing lab rules of thumb for adjective and adverb use

UWF WRITING LABRULES OF THUMB FOR ADJECTIVE AND ADVERB USE

From Real Good Grammar, Too

by Mamie Webb Hixon

Created by April Turner

Revised by Mamie Webb Hixon July 1, 2010


Uwf writing lab rules of thumb for adjective and adverb use

  • SPEAKER 1: How are you today?

    Which respondent are you?

  • SPEAKER 2: I’m good.

  • SPEAKER 3: I’m well.


Uwf writing lab rules of thumb for adjective and adverb use

  • SPEAKER 1: How are you today?

    Which respondent are you?

  • SPEAKER 2: I’m good.

  • SPEAKER 3: I’m well.

    [By using “good” as a descriptor, is Speaker 2

    saying that he or she is “well behaved”?]


Other common adjective adverb errors in spoken and written english

Other Common Adjective/Adverb Errors in Spoken and Written English

  • The Williams sisters play tennis remarkable well.

  • How quick time passes when you’re having fun!

  • The applicants felt very badly about missing the first phase of the interview.

  • These encounters make me feel real awkward.

  • Yes, we sure do serve nonalcoholic beverages.


Corrections

CORRECTIONS

  • The Williams sisters play tennis remarkably well.

  • How quickly time passes when you’re having fun!

  • The applicants felt very bad about missing the first phase of the interview.

  • These encounters make me feel really awkward.

  • Yes, we surely do serve nonalcoholic beverages.


Adjective use

ADJECTIVE USE

  • Use ADJECTIVES with these verbs:

  • Be-verbs

    MNEMONIC DEVICE FOR Be-VerbsMr. Isamarewaswere

    isarewerebeing

    amwasbeen

  • Sense Verbs

    lookfeeltastesmellsound

  • Linking Verbs

    becomeremainappearseem


Some verbs act as both linking verbs and performers of action

Some verbs act as both linking verbs and performers of action.

  • LINKING USEACTION USE

  • The speaker soundsThe speaker sounds her good.vowels distinctly.

  • He looked sympathetic.He looked sympathetically at the mourners.


Some verbs that are not sense verbs have the meaning of is or are and therefore require adjectives

Some verbs that are not sense verbs have the meaning of “is” or “are” and, therefore, require adjectives.

  • High school and college seem [are] very different. High school and college students behavedifferently.

  • The judge remained [was] silent throughout the trial.

    The jurors entered the courtroom silently.


Adverb use

ADVERB USE

  • Most adverbs are formed with the addition of the –ly suffix to an existing adjective:

    cautiouslysurprisinglyusually

    safelyinadvertentlyquietly

  • Use ADVERBS to qualify and modify and intensify:

    You play pinochle well.

    You play pinochle remarkably well.

    You play pinochle very well.


Adverb use1

ADVERB USE

Your friendship is

generously given

happily accepted

deeply appreciated


Use of adjectives and adverbs

Use of Adjectives and Adverbs

  • He is strange.He behaves strangely.

  • Be careful.Drive carefully.

  • The explanation isThink clearly.clear.

  • I am sure.You surely do look good.

  • The response timeWe need to act quickly.was quick.

  • I feel bad.The men are behaving badly.


Adjectives and adverbs

Adjectives and Adverbs

  • Use adjectives after sense verbs such as look, smell, taste, feel, or sound:

    The steak tastes very good.

  • Use adjectives after linking verbs (is, am, are, was, were and other forms of be):

    I am usually very prompt for meetings.

  • Most adverbs end in –ly; use adverbs after action verbs:

    I usually arrivepromptly for meetings.


The difference between adjectives and adverbs

The difference between adjectives and adverbs

  • ADJECTIVESADVERBS

    badbadly

    carefulcarefully

    clearclearly

    courteouscourteously

    differentdifferently

    quickquickly

    strangestrangely

    suresurely


Helpful tips from the hbj workbook 1992

Helpful Tips from The HBJ Workbook, 1992

  • I feel bad. =

  • I feel badly. =

  • I feel good. =

  • I feel well. =

  • I feel well. =

  • [I am sorry.]

  • [I can’t tell if the surface is rough or smooth.]

  • [I am happy.]

  • [My health is fine.]

  • [My fingers are especially sensitive.]


Bad and badly

Bad and Badly

  • Bad is an adjective: I feel bad about the delay.

  • Badly is an adverb: The bruise doesn't hurt so badly now.


Which sentence is grammatically correct

Which sentence is grammatically correct?

  • Although I never did good in spelling bees, I have always considered myself a decent speller.

  • I did really well on “The 25 Most Commonly Misspelled Words” quiz; I missed only one word – “misspell.”


Good and well

Good and Well

  • Good is an adjective: You look good in blue. You wear it well.

  • Well is an adverb: He gets along well with his co-workers.

  • Well is also an adjective when it is used to refer to health: I am not well today.

  • You look good, and you look well too.


Real and really

Real and Really

  • Real is an adjective meaning "genuine"; reallyis an adverb: The admiral has real charm, so he is really charismatic.

  • The use of real as an adverb is colloquial or nonstandard:

  • He writes realreally well.

  • My high school teachers were real really [or very] strict.


Uwf writing lab rules of thumb for adjective and adverb use

Use “real” preceding nouns; use “really” preceding adjectives (“very,” however, is a more formal adverb than “really.”)

  • real excitement

  • a real disadvantage

  • a real friend

  • a real honor

  • a real difference

  • a real crisis

  • a real surprise

  • real love

  • really exciting

  • really disadvantageous

  • really friendly

  • really honorable

  • really different

  • really critical

  • really surprising

  • really lovable


Sure and surely

Sure and Surely

  • Sure is an adjective meaning “certain.”

  • I am sure that congressional hearings are nothing more than vapid, hollow charades.

  • Surely is an adverb meaning “certainly.”

INCORRECT: The city council sure

(certain) is making a number of

decisions this year.

CORRECT: The city council surely

(certainly) is making a number of

decisions this year.


Which sentence is grammatically correct1

Which sentence is grammatically correct?

  • Tips! We sure do thank you.

  • SPEAKER 1: Are you open Monday?

    SPEAKER 2: We sure are.


Which sentence is grammatically correct2

Which sentence is grammatically correct?

  • Tips! We sure do thank you.

  • SPEAKER 1: Are you open Monday?

    SPEAKER 2: We sure are. [Both sentences are incorrect. Since “surely” would sound stuffy here, try “certainly.”]


Sort of and kind of

Sort of and kind of

  • Sort of and kind of are often misused in written English by writers who actually mean rather or somewhat: Lannie was kind of rather saddened by the results of the test.


Based on the information in this lesson which speaker is correct

Based on the information in this lesson, which speaker is correct?

  • SPEAKER 1: How are you today?

    Which respondent are you?

  • SPEAKER 2: I’m good.

  • SPEAKER 3: I’m well.


Let s practice

LET’S PRACTICE!!!

  • Our instructor pronounces his words very (precise, precisely).

  • precisely

  • My pen was writing so (bad, badly) that I threw it away.

  • badly

  • The experts are (somewhat, kind of) undecided about the wisdom of such a tax.

  • somewhat

  • The woman looked (different, differently) than she did the day before.

  • different


Let s practice a little more

LET’S PRACTICE A LITTLE MORE!!!

  • She looks (different, differently) at the situation now.

  • differently

  • I feel (bad, badly) about missing the concert.

  • bad

  • Make sure that she stirs the cookie batter (good, well).

  • well

  • Ted is a (real, really) good singer.

  • really


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