Cadastre 2014 Data Model: A component for National Land Agencies

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1. Overview. IntroductionStatus reviewCadastre 2014 concepts of FIGData Model considerationsTechnologyResearch. 2. Approach. Define useful GIS data model for many usersBuild simple, multi-purpose modelBuild useful collaborations and networks Publish and share the resultsProcess, not Produ

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Cadastre 2014 Data Model: A component for National Land Agencies

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1. Cadastre 2014 Data Model: A component for National Land Agencies Jerry Johnson Cadastre Regional Manager ESRI - Europe

2. 1 Overview Introduction Status review Cadastre 2014 concepts of FIG Data Model considerations Technology Research

3. 2 Approach Define useful GIS data model for many users Build simple, multi-purpose model Build useful collaborations and networks Publish and share the results Process, not Product

4. 3 Basis Workshops and other activities in 2003 Many initiatives Many research projects Many participants – agencies, individuals Cadastre 2014 initiative – global recognition Many specific needs

5. 4 What has been done so far? Last year – first draft model Group discussions Workshops First attempt to create a “complete” model

6. 5

7. 6 What changed this year This year – revision and new approach Acknowledge many needs and visions “Higher Ground” approach Generic Cadastre 2014 concepts

8. 7 ArcGIS Data Model based on the FIG Cadastre 2014 ideas Generic Adaptable to any special needs Solid foundation for any cadastral agency

9. 8 Cadastre 2014 Based on 6 main principles Trying to look into the future of cadastre Suggests major changes in approach

10. 9 Legal Situation of Land

11. 10 Integration with the Register

12. 11 Modeling Over Mapping

13. 12 True “E-Cadastre”

14. 13 Private Sector Involvement

15. 14 Cost Recovery

16. 15 Traditional Approach to Cadastre Traditional cadastre Two separate parts – map and text (register) Focus on parcel Buildings – three different ways to represent As attribute As geographic object linked to the parcel As individual object not linked to the parcel

17. 16 Cadastre 2014 Why is Cadastre 2014 different ? Extended definition of the cadastral unit – land object instead of just the parcel Allows to manage objects such as zoning etc. Allows to include rights and restrictions Legal independence – objects arranged according to the laws that define them – easier to update Replacement of Cadastral maps with models Use of topology for discovery of relationships

18. 17 Basic Structure Use of the most simple data structure Use of GIS functionality – e.g. overlay or topology

19. 18 Long transactions Cadastral work = long transactions Need to handle objects “in progress”

20. 19 Traditional Land Objects The right usually defined by law Law defines types of rights and how to document

21. 20 Encumbrances Modeled the same way – if spatially defined Types – access right or restriction, use right, etc.

22. 21 Traditional Buildings Legal land objects subject to building laws Types of rights – construction, demolition, etc.

23. 22 Land Objects from Public Legislation Land-Use Environmental Protection

24. 23 Land Use Laws define zones where use is regulated, etc. Laws define types of use rights

25. 24 Environmental Protection Laws define zones where use is regulated, etc. Laws define types of use rights

26. 25 Informal and Indigenous Objects The basic model follows the same approach

27. 26 Summary All types of objects are modeled in a very similar way – difference in content only Good conceptual model Simplifies approach Good use of technology Implementation concerns / points to remember

28. 27 Implementation considerations It is easy to build a good technical model but: Legal issues / requirements Workflow needs / considerations Organizational considerations Technology options Functionality vs. ease of use Performance Cost Future developments Legacy systems / procedures

29. 28 Basic Data Model Versioned feature class Non-versioned feature class Versioned geodatabase or link to external system Table

30. 29 Technology Versioning Projected and Valid objects Claimants Rights GIS operators Topology Links / relations to other systems Population Registry Fiscal Registry Tax Registry

31. 30 GIS Operators Topology Used to “discover” relationships: Building inside the parcel Overlay Relationships between features Versioning Manage history and transactions

32. 31 Future opportunities WEB Services Distributed databases / replication Mobile solutions

33. 32 Web Services Provide A New Architecture For GIS

34. 33 Real Estate Portals

35. 34

36. 35 ArcIMS GIS Portal Tool Kit Components and Tools for Building Your Own Metadata Catalog Service

37. 36 To Support New Multi-Discipline Requirements GIS Must Become More Intelligent From Data to Information to Knowledge

38. 37 GIS Is Becoming More Intelligent Managing Datasets, Workflows … … In a Common Environment

39. 38 Manage Intelligence in Geodatabase

40. 39 Support All The Generic Spatial Data Types

41. 40 Add “Intelligence” To Features

42. 41 Domain Data Models Extend Basic Data Types Basics: ESRI’s promotion of standard, industry-based data models makes the idea of the previous slide practical. Details: Data models, regularly shared between our users, not only provide consistency for data sharing, but encapsulate relevant knowledge for making the information we work with more intelligent and makes our work more realistic and valuable for answering important societal questions. Script: Another unique asset for the ESRI user community and a great example of the sharing of best practices is the 3 years of development effort that have gone into the of building generic, thematic data models. ESRI and its users have collaborated to design a large and continually growing catalog of thematic data models, free-ly available, and ready to start building geodatabases and projects with.Basics: ESRI’s promotion of standard, industry-based data models makes the idea of the previous slide practical. Details: Data models, regularly shared between our users, not only provide consistency for data sharing, but encapsulate relevant knowledge for making the information we work with more intelligent and makes our work more realistic and valuable for answering important societal questions. Script: Another unique asset for the ESRI user community and a great example of the sharing of best practices is the 3 years of development effort that have gone into the of building generic, thematic data models. ESRI and its users have collaborated to design a large and continually growing catalog of thematic data models, free-ly available, and ready to start building geodatabases and projects with.

43. 42 Geoprocessing Models – Best Practices and Applications

44. 43 Intelligent GIS

45. 44

46. 45 Services Oriented Architecture (SOA)

47. 46 Land Information Systems Valuation and Taxation Modeling ArcGIS Desktop: ArcCatalog ArcCatalog allows you to create, manage and edit ISO metadata Over the last few years the International Organization for Standardization's (ISO) technical committee (TC) number 211 has been developing a variety of standards about geographic information. One of them, ISO 19115 Geographic Information – Metadata, is a metadata content standard that attempts to provide one solution that satisfies certain requirements. The ISO standard has a core set of elements, which includes a few mandatory elements and an additional set of recommended ones. Beyond the core, the ISO standard provides a large number of elements that can be used to thoroughly document a dataset. It has been designed with international audience in mind. ArcCatalog stores metadata in an Extensible Markup Language (XML) representation of the ISO metadata standard ArcIMS Metadata Services Create a central, online metadata repository that facilitates publishing and browsing metadata over the Internet The Metadata documents stored as ArcIMS Metadata Services can then be accessed using any client that communicates using ArcXML such as: ArcCatalog ArcIMS Metadata Explorer: set of Java Server Pages (JSP) that can be used to build a customized, browser-based means of searching for metadata ISO 239.50 Clients: ISO 239.50 is an international standard that defines a protocol for computer-to-computer information retrieval. See ArcNews article p.7 in Spring 2002 issue, entitled ArcIMS and ArcGIS Combine to Bring Spatial Metadata to the Internet. <http://www.esri.com/news/arcnews/spring02articles/arcims-and-arcgis.html> ArcGIS Desktop: ArcCatalog ArcCatalog allows you to create, manage and edit ISO metadata Over the last few years the International Organization for Standardization's (ISO) technical committee (TC) number 211 has been developing a variety of standards about geographic information. One of them, ISO 19115 Geographic Information – Metadata, is a metadata content standard that attempts to provide one solution that satisfies certain requirements. The ISO standard has a core set of elements, which includes a few mandatory elements and an additional set of recommended ones. Beyond the core, the ISO standard provides a large number of elements that can be used to thoroughly document a dataset. It has been designed with international audience in mind. ArcCatalog stores metadata in an Extensible Markup Language (XML) representation of the ISO metadata standard ArcIMS Metadata Services Create a central, online metadata repository that facilitates publishing and browsing metadata over the Internet The Metadata documents stored as ArcIMS Metadata Services can then be accessed using any client that communicates using ArcXML such as: ArcCatalog ArcIMS Metadata Explorer: set of Java Server Pages (JSP) that can be used to build a customized, browser-based means of searching for metadata ISO 239.50 Clients: ISO 239.50 is an international standard that defines a protocol for computer-to-computer information retrieval. See ArcNews article p.7 in Spring 2002 issue, entitled ArcIMS and ArcGIS Combine to Bring Spatial Metadata to the Internet. <http://www.esri.com/news/arcnews/spring02articles/arcims-and-arcgis.html>

48. 47 ArcGIS Server

49. 48 Research projects Several areas being explored: Survey 3D / Vertical parcels Multipurpose cadastre Growing interest in Cadastre / Land Administration FIG working groups ITC Looking into the future beyond 2014

50. 49 Implementation examples Cadastre is on top of the list Many countries in the process Modernizing Creating Commercial solutions LMV - http://www.lantmateriet.se/ AED-SICAD - http://www.sicad.de/pages/ueber_uns/index.html NovaLIS Technologies - http://www.novalistech.com/ ILS - http://www.landsystems.com/ …..

51. 50 Research references FIG web site – www.fig.net Commission 7 - http://www.swisstopo.ch/fig-wg71/ Christiaan Lemmen Prof. Peter van Oosterom Jurg Kaufmann Daniel Steudler Prof. Paul van der Molen …..

52. 51 Things to remember There is no single silver bullet for all – one data model cannot satisfy all Implementation is more critical than data model structures and options Use the lessons learned from implementing the design to refine the model

53. 52 Summary More information support.esri.com/datamodels/ Other technical workshops Versioning , Topology in a Geodatabase Other sessions web

54. 53 Thank You. Jerry Johnson – [email protected] www.support.esri.com/datamodels

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