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PRESENTATION TO THE WORLD URANIUM WEAPONS CONFERENCE HAMBURG GERMANY OCTOBER 16 2003 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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PRESENTATION TO THE WORLD URANIUM WEAPONS CONFERENCE HAMBURG GERMANY OCTOBER 16 2003. The uniform we wore during the Gulf War, the white gloves and hood are anti flash gear and around the waist on the belt was a life jacket, gas mask and water bottle in some cases. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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PRESENTATION TO THE WORLD URANIUM WEAPONS CONFERENCE HAMBURG GERMANY OCTOBER 16 2003

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PRESENTATION

TO THE

WORLD URANIUM

WEAPONS CONFERENCE

HAMBURG GERMANY OCTOBER 16 2003


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The uniform we wore during the Gulf War, the white gloves and hood are anti flash gear and around the waist on the belt was a life jacket, gas mask and water bottle in some cases.

If your job was lookout or signalman then you had the NBC suits, which were very hot to wear.

Philip Steele age 41

Australian Gulf War Veteran

Served 8 years in the Australian Navy

Medically discharged 1992 after returning home from the Gulf War 1990/1991.

Diagnosed Generalized Anxiety Disorder Complicated by Depression with PTSD

100% Disability Pension from the Australian Department of Veteran Affairs

Volunteer at the Association of the Totally and Permanently Incapacitated Ex Servicemen and Women WA Branch

Chairman of Australian Gulf War veterans and Peace Keepers Association in Western Australia


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1HMAS SYDNEY FFG 093

Photograph taken of the Frigate HMAS SYDNEY alongside in Dubai.HMAS SYDNEY was the ship I served on during the Gulf War


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  • My Interest in Depleted Uranium

  • My interest comes from wanting to assist other Veterans after being discharged from the Navy and not knowing how to get help from the Government and the Navy.

  • I was helped by some other veterans and members of Ex Service Organizations, so I am trying to do the same with others that look for help.

  • I was diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder complicated by Depression with PTSD as Gulf War Syndrome is not recognized in Australia as a medical condition

  • Repatriation Medical Authority 18 August 2003www.rma.gov.au

  • Concluded its investigation into Gulf War syndrome with the issuing of a declaration. This declaration is expected to appear in the Government Notices Gazette of 20 August 2003. The RMA formed the view that Gulf War syndrome is not a "disease" as defined in section 5D of the Act.

  • Other Australian’s that have served in the Gulf War 1 are still battling with undefined illnesses and a stigma that the Gulf War was not a War.


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Australian Government position on

Gulf War Syndrome

Selection of quotes from Media Releases from the Minister of Veteran Affairs

  • A major independent study into the health of veterans of the 1991 Gulf War has found no Gulf War Syndrome.

  • The study also found that the number of deaths and cancers amongst Gulf War veterans was lower than those expected in the general population

  • No personnel serving on ADF operations in the 1991 Gulf War were given anthrax vaccinations

  • Veterans taking part in the study were examined and their health compared to a similar group of Australian Defence Force members who did not serve in the Gulf, as well as against the health of the general population

  • “Some 80 per cent of Gulf War veterans agreed to be examined for the study, enabling the study team to achieve results that were as accurate as possible,”


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DEFENCE ALLAYS FEARS IN RELATION TO DEPLETED URANIUM MUNITIONS

The Acting Chief of the Defence Force, Lieutenant General Des Mueller, confirmed today that Defence was aware of the growing concern about the possible health effects of depleted uranium munitions used in the Balkans.

"There have been a number of Australian Defence Force personnel who have served with the peacekeeping forces in Bosnia and on attachment to allied units in Kosovo," Lt Gen Mueller said. "Whilst it is unlikely that ADF personnel in the Balkans have been exposed to depleted uranium, I have directed that those individuals who have served in the Balkans be identified and their degree of exposure assessed. However, on the information available, any risk to ADF personnel would be minimal," he said.

"The Australian Defence Force does not use depleted uranium and holds no depleted uranium stocks", he said. "Whilst depleted uranium ammunition was provided with the initial purchase of the Phalanx anti missile system fitted to some RAN Ships in the early 1980s, the ammunition was phased out before 1986 and replaced with the Australian-developed tungsten-tipped ammunition".


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EXTRACTS FROM THE AUSTRALIAN GULF WAR VETERANS HEALTH STUDY

Australian Naval personnel were unlikely to have been exposed to DU, unless from a battle field tour.  The only people likely to have been exposed to DU were those ADF personnel deployed with US or UK contingents involved in the special situations described above, or those who took souvenirs from damaged and destroyed tanks hit by DU rounds.


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Overall findings, discussion and recommendations

Volume Two Chapter 19

Therefore, in response to the main hypothesis of the study we conclude that the health of Australian veterans of the Gulf War does differ significantly from similar Australian Defence Force personnel who were not deployed to the Gulf War.  The differences in health outcome are evident across a number of different psychological and physical health outcomes and body systems

Therefore, in response to the main hypothesis of the study we conclude that the health of Australian veterans of the Gulf War does differ significantly from similar Australian Defence Force personnel who were not deployed to the Gulf War.  The differences in health outcome are evident across a number of different psychological and physical health outcomes and body systems


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Other Possible Exposures of Australians to DU

  • Croatia, Bosnia Herzegovina and Macedonia (The Former Yugoslavia). 12 January 1992- December 1992

  • The Former Yugoslav Republic (FYR ) 25 Jan 1997 – Present

  • Kosovo 24 Aug 1999 – Present

  • Kuwait 15 Feb – 8 Mar 1998

  • Persian Gulf, Kuwait, Diego Garcia, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Pakistan & Afghanistan Nov 2001 – December 2002.

  • Diego Garcia, The Persian Gulf, Jordan, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Iraq. January 2003 –June 2003

There are still Australians serving in Iraq approximately 800 and there are other Australian’s serving in places like the Middle East, Afghanistan and East Timor to mention just a couple


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PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE GULF WAR 1990/1991