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Silas Little Experimental Forest New Jersey. Climate, Fire, and Carbon Cycle Sciences Research Work Unit NRS-06. Rich Birdsey (project leader, Newtown Square, PA) Warren Heilman (Group Leader) Jay Charney (Research Meteorologist Xindi Bian (Meteorologist).

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Climate, Fire, and Carbon Cycle Sciences Research Work Unit NRS-06

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Climate fire and carbon cycle sciences research work unit nrs 06

Silas Little Experimental Forest

New Jersey

Climate, Fire, and Carbon Cycle Sciences

Research Work Unit NRS-06

Rich Birdsey (project leader, Newtown Square, PA)

Warren Heilman (Group Leader)

Jay Charney (Research Meteorologist

Xindi Bian (Meteorologist)


Climate fire and carbon cycle sciences research work unit nrs 06

Evaluation of Computational Methods for the Low Elevation Haines Index.

Potential Future Changes in the Atmospheric Component of Fire Risk.

Haines Index Climatology using the North American Regional Reanalysis


Climate fire and carbon cycle sciences research work unit nrs 06

FIREFLUX Experiment


Climate fire and carbon cycle sciences research work unit nrs 06

A modular modeling system that enables fire information, consumption, and smoke modeling.

Lesley Fusina, Sharon Zhong. Jay Charney and Xindi Bian

Evaluate model predictions of smoke using observational data from the October 2007 Southern California Wildfire outbreaks. The results indicate that while smoke models can currently predict smoke trajectories, the timing of smoke impacts and predictions of ground concentrations need improvement.


Climate fire and carbon cycle sciences research work unit nrs 06

Impacts of Land Management on the Climate System

Research Participants

Principal Investigator

Warren E. Heilman, Research Meteorologist, US Forest Service Northern Research Station

David Hollinger, Plant Physiologist, US Forest Service Northern Research Station

Ken Clark, Research Forester, US Forest Service Northern Research Station

Xindi Bian, US Forest Service Northern Research Station

Richard Birdsey, Project Leader, US Forest Service Northern Research Station

Yude Pan, Research Forester, US Forest Service Northern Research Station

Research Partners

Sharon Zhong, Atmospheric Scientist, Michigan State University

Xiuping Li, Visiting Scientist, Michigan State University


Climate fire and carbon cycle sciences research work unit nrs 06

Development of Modeling Tools for Predicting

Smoke Dispersion from Low-Intensity Fires

Principal Investigator: Warren E. Heilman

OSU RAFLES Model


Climate fire and carbon cycle sciences research work unit nrs 06

Original Experimental Design

NJ Pine Barrens

N

Pine overstory, Vaccinium with Oak understory 265 Acres

Ambient measurements

1 km NW of burn site

Wind

Direction

Plow lines (Ignitions along lines from south to north)

30 m Tower

10 m Tower

PM2.5 Monitor

20 m Tower

3 m Tower

SODAR


Climate fire and carbon cycle sciences research work unit nrs 06

Air Stagnation Advisory Research


Climate fire and carbon cycle sciences research work unit nrs 06

JSFP RAWS project

Jay Charney

Sharon Zhong

Mike Kiefer

Investigating the differences between the gridded meteorological fields produced by the Real Time Mesoscale Analysis (RTMA) and observed meteorological conditions at Remote Automated Weather Stations (RAWS) in the northeastern United States.

The differences will be analyzed and tools developed to improve the interpretation of NWS fire weather forecasts and clarify their role in fire management decision making.


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