Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 40

Educational standards and economic and social development PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 50 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Educational standards and economic and social development. Lisbon Council Brussels, 14 September 2005 Andreas Schleicher Head, Indicators and Analysis Division OECD Directorate for Education.

Download Presentation

Educational standards and economic and social development

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)

Educational standards and economic and social development

Lisbon CouncilBrussels, 14 September 2005

Andreas Schleicher

Head, Indicators and Analysis Division

OECD Directorate for Education


Making Europe the world‘s premier knowledge economy by 2010.

Using education as a lever to compete by working smarter, rather than working harder or cheaper.


Where are the drivers of the knowledge economy in education?

Knowledge

Connectiveness

Flexibility

Innovation


Delivering high level qualifications.

A world of change.


Growth in university-level qualificationsApproximated by the percentage of persons with ISCED 5A/6 qualfication in the age groups 55-64, 45-55, 45-44 und 25-34 years (2003)

2

3

10

15

23

16

14

9

21

1

A1.3a


Borderless education:Where international students goPercentage of foreign tertiary students reported to the OECD who are enrolled in each country of destination

According to the Shanghai rating, 17 of the world’s top 20 universities are in the United States


From institutions to qualificationsTertiary-type A graduation rates, by duration (2003)

%


A moving targetSum of net entry rates into tertiary education for single year of age (2003)

%

Current graduation rate


Mobilising resources

Who pays for education and who benefits ?


Economies and ideologies

…in Austria, Germany, Denmark and Norway private sources contribute a much larger share of the costs of early childhood education and care than for tertiary education

Investment in high-level qualificationsExpenditure on tertiary educational institutions as a percentage of GDP (2002)

B2.1


Annual expenditure per studenton educational institutions, in equivalent US dollars converted using PPPs


Where do high skills pay?Distribution of 25-64-year-olds by level of earnings

EU

United States


The returns on high level qualificationsPrivate internal rates of return (RoR) for an individual obtaining a university-level degree (ISCED 5/6) from an upper secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary level of education (ISCED 3/4), MALES


The driving forces of GDP per capita growthAverage annual percentage change (1990-2000)

  • But in almost all countries, the biggest contribution came from increased labour productivity

  • Ireland, Korea, Mexico and Turkey were the only countries where demography made a significant positive impact on GDP per capita growth…

  • Increases in employment rates made a big contribution to growth in some countries

But where does labour productivity growth come from…

…and why does it vary so much across countries?

…in others it is beginning to act as a slight drag on growth

  • While declines in employment rates reduced growth in others


Enhancements in human capital contribute to labour productivity growthAverage annual percentage change (1990-2000)


Making lifelong learning a reality.

For all.


Participation of the labour force in non-formal job-related continuing education and training (2003)

%


Participation of the labour force in non-formal job-related continuing education and training (2003)

%


Participation of the labour force in non-formal job-related continuing education and training (2003)

%


Who can afford these productivity differentials ?

How school performance varies .


Consistency in quality standardsVariation in the performance of 15-year-olds in mathematics

Variation of performance within schools

Variation of performance between schools

14

12

1

11

5

OECD (2004), Learning for tomorrow’s world: First results from PISA 2003, Table 4.1a, p.383.


Using the potential.

Equality in outcomes and equity in opportunities.


School performance and schools’ socio-economic background - Germany

Student performance

PISA Index of social background

Disadvantage

Advantage

Student performance and student SES within schools

School performance and school SES

Student performance and student SES

School proportional to size

Figure 4.13


School performance and schools’ socio-economic background - Finland

Student performance and student SES

Student performance and student SES within schools

School performance and school SES

School proportional to size

Student performance

PISA Index of social background

Disadvantage

Advantage

Figure 4.13


Making education a knowledge rich profession


One challenge – different approaches

The future of education systems needs to be “knowledge rich”

Informed professional judgement, the teacher as a “knowledge worker”

Informed prescription

National prescription

Professional judgement

Uninformed prescription, teachers implement curricula

Uninformed professional judgement

The tradition of education systems has been “knowledge poor”


Further information

  • www.pisa.oecd.org

    • All national and international publications

    • The complete micro-level database

  • email: [email protected]

  • [email protected]

    …and remember:

    Without data, you are just another person with an opinion


What can a 15-year-old expect in the next 15 years ? (2003)


Share of the 25-to-29-year-olds who are unemployed and not in education, by level of educational attainment (2003)

%


The situation of the youth population with low levels of education (2003)Share of 20-to-24-year olds who have not attained upper secondary education and who are no longer in education

%


D1.2. Total number of intended instruction hours in public institutions between ages 7 and 14 (2003)

Cumulative number of intended instructions hours


D2.1. Average class size in lower secondary education (2003)Number of students per class in public and private institutions

Number of students per class


D3.2. Teachers salaries in lower secondary education (2003)Annual statutory teachers’ salaries in public institutions for teachers of lower secondary education, in equivalent US dollars converted using PPPs

Equivalent US dollars converted using purchasing power parities


D3.1b. Ratio of statutory salaries after 15 years of experience to GDP per capita for teachers in lower secondary education (2003)

Ratio


D4.2. Number of teaching hours per year, by level of education (2003) Net contact time in hours per year in public institutions

Hours per year


  • Login