2006 faculty well being survey a quick look at a few things that matter to faculty
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2006 Faculty Well-Being Survey: A Quick Look at A Few Things that Matter to Faculty. Presentation for NC State University Board of Trustees Academic Affairs and Personnel Committee November 15, 2007 Nancy Whelchel, PhD Assistant Director for Survey Research University Planning and Analysis

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2006 Faculty Well-Being Survey: A Quick Look at A Few Things that Matter to Faculty

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2006 faculty well being survey a quick look at a few things that matter to faculty

2006 Faculty Well-Being Survey:A Quick Look atA Few Things that Matterto Faculty

Presentation for NC State University Board of Trustees

Academic Affairs and Personnel Committee

November 15, 2007

Nancy Whelchel, PhD

Assistant Director for Survey Research

University Planning and Analysis

http://www2.acs.ncsu.edu/UPA/survey/faculty/


Overview

Overview

  • Sources of Stress

  • Workload

  • Research & Publication Demands

  • Work/Life Balance

  • Reappointment, Promotion & Tenure

  • Salary & Benefits


Sources of stress

Sources of Stress

  • More than two-thirds of faculty say they experience ‘a great deal’ or ‘some’ stress from workload, research/publication demands, and work/life balance


Sources of stress continued

Sources of Stress (continued)

  • One-third or fewer faculty say they experience ‘a great deal’ or ‘some’ stress from relationships with college administration, faculty in their department, or with students


Workload hours work per week

Workload: # Hours Work Per Week

  • NC State faculty report working an average of 55 hours per week

  • 17% report working more than 60 hours per week

Mean = 55 hrs

Mode = 50 hrs


Workload hours work per week by rank

Workload:# Hours Work Per Week(by rank)

  • The number of hours work per week slightly increases after tenure


Workload hours work per week by rank gender race

Workload: # Hours Work Per Week(by rank/gender & race)

  • No significant gender differences in number of hours work, BUT

    • Female Assistant Professors are slightly more likely than others to be working more than 60 hours per week

    • Female Associate Professors are slightly less likely than others to be working more than 60 hours per week

  • African Americans are more likely than others to be working more than 60 hours per week


Workload hours work per week by rank gender

Workload: # Hours Work Per Week(by rank/gender)


Workload activities

Workload: Activities

  • Faculty workload includes a wide range of activities


Workload activities1

Workload: Activities

  • 95% of faculty report that their work includes at least three of the following activities, with 40% participating in all four

    • Teaching/mentoring of students

    • Research/scholarly activities

    • Service work

    • Extension, engagement & economic development


Workload time on activities

Workload: Time onActivities

  • This 95% of faculty* spend, on average, one-third of their time research/scholarly activities, and one-third on teaching/mentoring

*Based on faculty who engage in at least 3 of the following: teaching, research, service, extension/engagement/economic development.


Workload time on activities by gender rank compared to their male counterparts

Female Assistant Professors spend

more time on

Teaching/mentoring students

less time on

Research & scholarly activities

Extension & engagement activities

Female Associate Professors spend

more time on

Teaching/mentoring student

Service work

less time on

Research & scholarly activities

Workload: Time on Activities(by gender/rank)Compared to their male counterparts…


Workload a note about administrative duties

Workload:A Note aboutAdministrative Duties

  • About two-thirds of faculty (not including lecturers) do not spend any time on college/department administration

  • Overall, the one-third of faculty who spend time on college/department administration spend an average of only 2% of their time on such duties

  • About one-fourth of Full Professors spend 25% or more of their time on college/department administrative duties


Workload and stress

Workloadand Stress

  • Stress related to workload is higher among :

    • Assistant professors

    • Women at every rank (especially female Full and Associate Professors)

      • Over half of female full and associate professors say their workload causes them “a great deal” of stress


Workload and stress by rank gender

Workload and Stress(by rank/gender)


Research publication resources support

Research/Publication:Resources & Support

  • One-third or more faculty give low ratings to numerous types of resources & support that could impact success with research/publications

    • Pre- and post-award support from the college and from the university for grant/contract-related activities

    • University provision of resources to support faculty success with discovery of knowledge

    • Availability of up-to-date equipment

    • Access to graduate research assistants

    • Clerical/administrative support in department

    • Technical assistance

    • Department head and college providing resources needed to do your job


Research publication demands and stress

Research/Publication Demandsand Stress

  • Stress related to research/publication demands is higher among:

    • Those less satisfied with various resources and support measures to assist with scholarly activities

    • Assistant professors

    • Women at every rank (especially female Associate Professors)

    • African Americans at every rank


Support for work life balance

Support for Work/Life Balance

  • Three-fourths of faculty agree that their department and NC State provide an environment that enables them to successfully balance their work and personal life

    • Less likely to agree:

      • Associate Professors

      • Women at every rank (especially female Associate & Assistant Professors)


Department support for work life balance by rank gender

Department Support for Work/Life Balance(by rank/gender)


University support for work life balance by rank gender

University Support for Work/Life Balance(by rank/gender)


Support for work life balance does it help with stress

Support for Work/Life Balance:Does it Help with Stress?

  • The majority of faculty who say that the environment enables them to balance work and personal life say they have experienced ‘some’ or ‘a great deal’ of stress from work/life balance in the past couple of years.


Work life balance and stress

Work/Life Balanceand Stress

  • Stress from work/life balance significantly decreases with rank for men, but not for women

  • At every rank women are more likely than men to experience ‘a great deal’ of stress from work/life balance

  • Male and female Assistant Professors are equally likely to report at least “some” stress from work/life balance


Work life balance and stress by rank gender

Work/Life Balance and Stress(by rank/gender)


Reappointment promotion tenure

Reappointment, Promotion, & Tenure

  • Three-fourths or more faculty give positive ratings to:

    • Clarity of performance review standards and procedures

    • Clarity of department RPT standards and procedures

    • Equity of department RPT standards and procedures

    • Lower ratings given by

      • Assistant Professors

      • Women (especially Associate Professors)


Reappointment promotion and tenure and stress

Reappointment, Promotion, and Tenureand Stress

  • Stress from RPT decreases with rank for both men and women

  • At every rank, women are more likely than men to experience at least “some” stress from RPT

  • Female Full and Associate Professors are much more likely than their male counterparts to experience “a great deal of stress” from RPT

  • RPT stress is higher among those who give lower ratings to the clarity and equity of RPT standards and procedures


Rpt and stress by rank gender

RPT and Stress(by rank/ gender)


Compensation overall satisfaction

Compensation: Overall Satisfaction

  • Slightly less than half of faculty agree that they are satisfied with their compensation (salary & benefits) at NC State.


Compensation overall satisfaction1

Compensation: Overall Satisfaction

  • Dissatisfaction with compensation is generally consistent across all groups

  • Least likely to be satisfied with overall compensation

    • Associate Professors, followed by Full Professors

    • Female Associate Professors

      • 76% of female Associate Professors are dissatisfied with their compensation (compared to next most dissatisfied group, male associate professors, with 57% dissatisfied)


Salary competitiveness

Salary: Competitiveness

  • Satisfaction with salary is lowest when compared to that of faculty in disciplines at comparable institutions outside the UNC system


Benefits competitiveness

Benefits: Competitiveness

  • A majority of faculty believe the NC State voluntary benefits program is competitive, but that the state healthcare benefits are not


Compensation satisfaction at nc state

Compensation& Satisfaction at NC State

  • Faculty who are satisfied with their compensation are more likely to be satisfied/engaged at NC State.


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