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Technical Foundations for the Non-Technical. Bill Sawyer Oracle Corporation [email protected] [email protected] Objectives & Outcomes. Objectives Learning Having Fun! Outcomes

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technical foundations for the non technical

Technical Foundations for the Non-Technical

Bill Sawyer Oracle Corporation

[email protected]

[email protected]

This work is licensed by Bill Sawyer under the Creative Commons

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objectives outcomes
Objectives & Outcomes
  • Objectives
    • Learning
    • Having Fun!
  • Outcomes
    • A sense of personal satisfaction that comes from knowing that you spent three hours learning something valuable.
    • A personal assessment of your technology level.
    • An individual plan to improve your technology level by identifying gaps and having strategies to fill those gaps.
    • Learning!

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how do you view technology
How do you view technology?

Arthur C. Clarke stated,

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.”

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you should be in this workshop if
You should be in this workshop if …
  • You are a WLP (Workplace Learning and Performance) professional who wants to improve their professional competence.

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you should be in this workshop if5
You should be in this workshop if …
  • You are a WLP (Workplace Learning and Performance) professional who wants to improve their professional competence.
  • You know you need to know more about technology, and you hope this workshop will help.

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you should be in this workshop if6
You should be in this workshop if …
  • You are a WLP (Workplace Learning and Performance) professional who wants to improve their professional competence.
  • You know you need to know more about technology, and you hope this workshop will help.
  • You really wanted to be in Lisa Spahn’s Disney workshop, but there are no seats available.

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slide7

ASTD Competency Model™

© American Society for Training & Development (ASTD). All Rights Reserved.

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slide8

What’s in it for me?

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the amazing bill answers
The Amazing Bill answers …

I always wanted to know how they did … ?

(a sneak peek behind magic of technology)

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isolation
Isolation

Sender

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communication
Communication

Sender Receiver

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conversation
Conversation

Sender Receiver

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frame of reference
Frame of Reference

Sender Receiver

Communication

Frame of Reference is all the things that the parties involved in

the communication have in common. The greater the F.O.R., the

greater the likelihood of agreement.

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frame of reference components
Frame of Reference Components
  • Verbal – of or concerned with words (7%)
    • Oral or spoken
    • Written
    • Sign languages

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frame of reference components15
Frame of Reference Components
  • Verbal
  • Non-verbal – wordless messaging (93%)
    • Gesture
    • Body language or posture
    • Object communication (clothes, uniforms, hair, etc.)
    • Haptics (touching, handshakes, kissing, etc.)
    • Oculesics (eyes)
    • Vocalics (tone, pitch, accent, volume, etc.)
    • Suprasegmentals (consonant, vowel, tone or stress sounds)

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frame of reference components16
Frame of Reference Components
  • Verbal
  • Non-verbal
  • Environment
    • Barriers
    • Enablers (e.g., disability accommodations)

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why is this important
Why is this important?
  • As our Frame of Reference increases, there is increased communication and a higher chance of learning.

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why is this important18
Why is this important?
  • As our Frame of Reference increases, there is increased communication and a higher chance of learning.
  • Too many technology courses focus on the environment, and that it either a barrier or an enabler but not communication in and of itself.

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why is this important19
Why is this important?
  • As our Frame of Reference increases, there is increased communication and a higher chance of learning.
  • Too many technology courses focus on the environment, and that it either a barrier or an enabler but not communication in and of itself.
  • I want you to learn, and if you don’t I have failed.

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an example of learning
An Example of Learning

Historie vs. Geschicte

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connotation vs denotation
Connotation vs. Denotation

In the WLP profession, we use:

  • Smile sheets
  • 5 levels of evaluation
  • Andragogy
  • Gagne
  • Bloom’s Taxonomy
  • Tell ‘em what your going to tell ‘em, tell ‘em, tell ‘em what you told ‘em! (AKA, Sage on a stage.)

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except
Except!

That isn’t what we are going to do here, this is a …

Conversation between professionals

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what do we have to do
What do we have to do?
  • Increase your vocabulary (denotation)
  • Improve your vocabulary (connotation)
  • Vocabulary itself (toolbox of words)

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your point of view
Your Point of View

Question:

What is Love?

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how would a
How would a …?
  • 5 year-old define it? (Mommy, Daddy, Teddy)
  • 16 year-old define it? (boyfriend, girlfriend)
  • 28 year-old define it? (fiancé, spouse)
  • 40 year-old define it? (spouse, kids)
  • 65 year-old define it? (grandkids)
  • A dictionary define it?
  • Who is right?

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the first big conclusion
The First Big Conclusion

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the first big conclusion27
The First Big Conclusion

The challenge we face in this conversation is expressing the ideas in a manner that makes sense to your point of view.

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guaranteed learning moment 1
Guaranteed Learning Moment #1

What is the answer to:

23 x 13 = ?

More importantly … how did you arrive at the answer?

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so what are we going to do
So what are we going to do?
  • Increase and improve your vocabulary.
  • Increase your frame of reference to allow better, deeper, and faster communication.
  • Expand your point of view. (see more of the elephant)
  • Add to your toolbox.

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how are we defining technology
How are we defining technology?
  • Computers and electronics
  • Internet resources
  • Research

But … we are going to apply these to the WLP profession.

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what s in your technology toolbox
What’s in your technology toolbox?

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slide32
So …

For this workshop, we need to “Think inside the box.”

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what are we going to put in the toolbox
What are we going to put in the toolbox?
  • Vocabulary
  • Software
  • Resources (web)
  • Research
  • Techniques

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windows vs mac os x
Windows vs. Mac OS X

Bottom-line: You should use the operating system / computer that most supports your requirements, and allows the greatest interaction amongst your peers.

  • Analogy: Windows is like building a ship model from balsa wood. It takes a lot more effort to do simple things, but virtually infinite variations are possible.
  • Analogy: Mac OS X is like building a ship model from a prefab kit. For the vast majority of cases, the kit model is superior, but without as many variations.

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so what is linux
So what is Linux?

Linux (pronounced Lynn-Ux) is a UNIX-based operating system. UNIX is an operating system originally developed for mainframes. Linux was create by a student, Linus Torvalds, who created it single-handedly as a student project. He then gifted it to the world.

In other words, unlike Windows or Mac OS X, you can obtain a copy of Linux (in fact, several variations of) for free.

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so is this how this course is going to go
So, is this how this course is going to go?

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so is this how this course is going to go37
So, is this how this course is going to go?

NO!

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toobox technique 1
Toobox: Technique #1

Email: At the very least, you should have 4 email addresses. They are as follows:

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toolbox resource 1
Toolbox: Resource #1

So, how do you get these email addresses?

  • Yahoo (@yahoo.com)
  • Google (@gmail.com)

Demonstration

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toolbox vocabulary 1
Toolbox: Vocabulary #1

Mainframes and Multi-user Operating Systems

  • Computers in the future may weigh no more than 1.5 tons. Popular Mechanics (1949)
  • In the future, the entire United States will at most require two computers. Anonymous (1954)

Servers

  • Machines not intended to run primarily for one user.

PCs/Macs/Laptops/Notebooks

  • Machines primarily intended to be use by one user.
  • Primarily running Windows or Mac OS X

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toolbox vocabulary 2
Toolbox: Vocabulary #2

So … what is software?

In the past, it was defined as software running on a computer to which you had direct access (i.e., you were a user).

  • Installed software
  • Server software (e.g., ERP systems, HR systems, etc.)
  • Databases

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toolbox vocabulary 242
Toolbox: Vocabulary #2

So … what is software?

In the Internet Age, it must be defined as software running on a computer to which you have access.

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why is this important43
Why is this important?

Because it deepens your connotation of the word, software. It allows you to see software that is available to you, but probably not installable on your PC. Bottom-line, it allows you to think differently.

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toolbox vocabulary 3 the internet
Toolbox: Vocabulary #3 - The Internet

There are several ways in which a computer can exist in relation to other computers.

  • Stand-alone / isolated systems (no network)
  • Intranet (company / organization)
  • Private networks (DOD, associations)
  • Internet (worldwide collection of computers)
  • Virtual Private Network (a private network over the Internet)

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toolbox technique 2
Toolbox: Technique #2

I noticed you had a @technicaltrainer.org. How do I get a cool address like that?

  • Join an existing domain (e.g., @yahoo.com)
  • Get your own domain
  • Check the domains availability
  • See who owns a domain (WHOIS)
  • Register a domain (reserving the name)

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toolbox technique 3
Toolbox: Technique #3

Get a webhosting company to server up your domain, and a whole lot more.

  • 1and1.com
  • GoDaddy.com
  • Yahoo.com

Demonstration

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toolbox vocabulary 4 6
Toolbox: Vocabulary #4 - #6
  • TCP/IP (Names vs. Numbers)
  • DNS (The 411 of the Internet)
  • Top-Level Domains (the .com, .org, .net)
  • Domain Registrars
  • ICANN (El Presidente)

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toolbox resources 2 5
Toolbox: Resources #2 - #5
  • Wikipedia.org
  • Wiktionary.org
  • M-W.com
  • Britannica.com

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toolbox technique 4
Toolbox: Technique #4

So, let’s set-up a webpage of our own.

  • @yahoo.com
  • @<our-own-domain>.com

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toolbox technique 5 security
Toolbox: Technique #5 … Security!

The Internet is the online equivalent of a major metropolis, with all the upscale neighborhoods and slums you would find in that metropolis. It also includes the helpful and the criminal.

Bottom-line: Protect yourself at all times. Know where you are (the neighborhood). Know who is around you (your associates). And arm yourself to defend yourself if needed (protective techniques and software).

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toolbox software 1 6
Toolbox: Software #1 - #6
  • Virus and Trojan Horse protection (AVG)
  • Spyware (Ad-Aware, Spybot-S&D!)
  • Firewalls (Zonelabs)
  • Spam (@yahoo.com)
  • Phishing (Windows Defender)
  • Worms

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types of attacks
Types of Attacks
  • Identity Theft
  • Spoofing (theft of your online ID)
  • Denial of Service – Distributed DOS
  • Zombies / Botnets
  • Hacking / Cracking

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toolbox techniques 6 9
Toolbox: Techniques #6 - #9

How else do you protect yourself?

  • Trusted sites (add in IE)
  • Digital certificates / SSL / HTTPS
  • Encryption
  • NAT (Network Address Translation)
  • Persistence of existence

Demonstration

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toolbox techniques 10 14 be social
Toolbox: Techniques #10 - #14 … Be Social

Assuming you have your protections in place, go out and use the wonderful social capabilities of the Internet.

  • Portals (Google, Yahoo)
  • Groups
  • Newsgroups (GoogleGroups)
  • Social Bookmarking (Digg, Del.icio.us)
  • Social Networks (LinkedIn.com)

Demonstration

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toolbox vocabulary 7 11 open up
Toolbox: Vocabulary #7 - #11 … Open Up!
  • Commercial software (Microsoft, et. al.)
  • Shareware (free to try, low-cost to buy)
  • Freeware
  • Closed source
  • Open source

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toolbox software 7 9
Toolbox: Software #7 - #9

So what kind of software can you expect for free?

  • Everything listed in #1 - #6 is free.
  • Everything in this workshop is free.
  • Most everything in this workshop is open source.
  • Microsoft Office replacement – OpenOffice
  • Microsoft Office replacement on web – Zoho
  • Adobe Photoshop replacement – GIMP

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toolbox software 10 11
Toolbox: Software #10 - #11

Want more?

  • Go to:

http://www.technicaltrainer.org/TrainerLinks.htm

  • Open up the DVD provided

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toolbox resource 6 9
Toolbox: Resource #6 - #9

So, what do you put on your webpage?

  • Get connected (hyperlink)
  • Borrow but give attribution (Creative Commons)
  • Associate yourself (WLP on the web)
  • Stay informed (RSS)

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toolbox vocabulary 12 19
Toolbox: Vocabulary #12 - #19
  • RSS (Feeds)
  • HTML
    • HTML (web pages)
    • WAP (for mobile devices)
    • XML (mainly machine to machine or translatable)
  • Push vs. Pull
  • P2P (e.g., Napster)
  • Distributed P2P (e.g., BitTorrent)
  • Wikis (collaboration)
  • Blogs (easy web posting)
  • Podcasting (MP3s + RSS)

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toolbox techniques 15 19 socialer
Toolbox: Techniques #15 - #19 … Socialer?

Here are ways to be even more social.

  • Instant Messaging (AIM, YIM)
  • VoIP / Skype (free phone calls, including concalls)
  • Forums
  • Mail Lists
  • Chat Rooms

Demonstrations

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the second big conclusion
The Second Big Conclusion

WHEEW! The Internet really does change things.

“When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, they are almost certainly right. But, when they state that something is impossible, they are very probably wrong.” (Arthur C. Clarke)

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the second big conclusion62
The Second Big Conclusion

So, this changes the whole “sage on a stage” approach.

If you really want to see what is possible, you need to look (primarily, but not solely) to the youthful.

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the second big conclusion63
The Second Big Conclusion

Chuck Hamilton, Director, Center For Advanced Learning, IBM

"In the United States, we\'re using Second Life to create a mentoring community. So if you\'re interested in talking to somebody who has 25 years in the business, we\'ve built a connection environment--a social-networking tool where you profile yourself, then meet in Second Life. We have multigenerational workforces, and this is a way to get together, virtually meet, and connect."

What is Second Life? It is an online game!

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toolbox vocabulary 19 30 next
Toolbox: Vocabulary #19 - #30 … Next?
  • TCP/IP Addressing
  • TCP/IP vs. IPv6 (Prioritization)
  • Software Methodologies
    • Dumb terminal -> Single-user -> Client-Server -> Distributed -> Web 2.0/AJAX -> Grid
    • Binary -> Assembler -> Compilers -> Non-procedural -> Java (WORM)
  • Network access (Broadband)
    • DSL vs. Cable vs. Wireless (WiFi) vs. Mobile (WiMax)
  • Protocols
    • HTTP vs. Telnet vs. FTP

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toolbox research 1
Toolbox: Research #1

It is critically important to apply the power of the Internet to the WLP research upon which we all rely. Why?

We remember by …

Reading 10%

Hearing 20%

Seeing 30%

Reading and Discussing 70%

Reading, discussing and doing 90%

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toolbox research 2
Toolbox: Research #2

Why else? We need to put ourselves into a “good” crisis.

The Chinese understand it best, the Chinese word for crisis is composed of the characters for

Danger + Opportunity

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toolbox research 3
Toolbox: Research #3

An in-class poll …

How many of you have heard of these findings in other courses? Or maybe you have even used them in your own courses?

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toolbox research 4
Toolbox: Research #4

Except all of those are FALSE!

  • http://www.willatworklearning.com/2006/12/another_guru_sh.html
  • http://www.pinyin.info/chinese/crisis.html

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toolbox research 5 9
Toolbox: Research #5 - #9

So, build your Research Toolbox as well.

  • Google
  • Wikipedia
  • Wikibooks
  • Beyond Google (link)
  • GASP! A book:
    • The Facts on File Guide to Research (Jeff Lenburg)

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toolbox vocabulary 31
Toolbox: Vocabulary #31

Skunk works:

Skunk works is a term used to describe a group within an organization given a high degree of autonomy and unhampered by bureaucracy, tasked with working on advanced or secret projects, and perhaps working on projects with very small budgets outside the normal review chain.

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toolbox software 12 22 skunk servers
Toolbox: Software #12 - #22 … Skunk Servers?

Think differently! Look at open source software. It is possible to create low-cost learning solutions, or at the very least do proof of concepts.

  • Webserver – Apache
  • Conferencing – dimdim
  • LMS – Moodle, Sakai, elgg, dokeos
  • Knowledge Management – drupal
  • Wiki – Tikiwiki
  • Blogging – Workpress
  • Database – MySQL, Oracle

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toolbox technique 20
Toolbox: Technique #20

Set-up your own skunk works.

Demonstration

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toolbox technique 21
Toolbox: Technique #21

Think differently! Apply a key concept used throughout this presentation … be social!

Look at the cast and crew list of any motion picture, even low budget independent films.

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toolbox technique 22
Toolbox: Technique #22

Build your Team Toolbox with skills in the following:

  • Producer (accountant / money)
  • Director (strategic vision)
  • Writer (tactical steps)
  • Camera, Sound, and Lighting
  • Crew
  • Cast / Talent / Faces / Voices
  • Special Effects

What roles do you play?

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toolbox technique 23
Toolbox: Technique #23

Your team is not just a metaphor:

  • Webcameras
  • Digital cameras
  • MP3 – Podcasting – Audacity
  • Animation – Flash – OpenLazlo / Pachyderm
  • eLearning – CamStudio – XERTE
  • Scriptwriting – celtx

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the third big conclusion
The Third Big Conclusion

SHARE and be a Big Tipper!

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the third big conclusion77
The Third Big Conclusion

If you want to learn more about technology, you will generally find techies to be very helpful. And, if you want to be really endear yourself to them, give them toys.

Techies love toys!

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the amazing bill answers78
The Amazing Bill answers …

I always wanted to know how they did … ?

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technical foundations for the non technical79

Technical Foundations for the Non-technical

Bill Sawyer Oracle Corporation

[email protected]

[email protected]

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