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Prose II – Eng 503. Introduction. English prose fiction appeared as translations from the Italian ‘novella’ in the sixteenth century These translations only have historical interest Lyly initiated English prose by publishing a little book entitled 'Euphues and His Anatomie of Wit.'.

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Prose ii eng 503

Prose II – Eng 503

Introduction





  • The invasion of England by William of Orange and the subsequent Glorious Revolution of 1688 firmly established a Protestant monarchy together with effective rule by Parliament.

  • The new science of the time, Newtonian physics, reinforced the belief that everything, including human conduct, is guided by a rational order.



  • The brilliant prose satirist Jonathan  well as standards of behavior.Swift was not so sanguine as Pope. His "savage indignation" resulted in devastating attacks on his age in A Tale of a Tub (1704), Gulliver's Travels (1726), and A Modest Proposal (1729).


  • The 18th cent. was the age of town life with its coffeehouses and clubs. One of the most famous of the latter was the Scriblerus Club, whose members included Pope, Swift, and John Gay (author of The Beggar's Opera ). Its purpose was to defend and uphold high literary standards against the rising tide of middle-class values and tastes.



Gulliver s travels into several remote nations of the world

Jonathan Swift Swift, Horace

GULLIVER’S TRAVELSinto severalREMOTE NATIONS OF THE WORLD


  • The author of these Travels, Mr. Lemuel Gulliver, is my ancient and intimate friend; there is likewise some relation between us on the mother’s side.  About three years ago, Mr. Gulliver growing weary of the concourse of curious people coming to him at his house in Redriff, made a small purchase of land, with a convenient house, near Newark, in Nottinghamshire, his native country; where he now lives retired, yet in good esteem among his neighbours.



  • Before he quitted Redriff, he left the custody of the following papers in my hands, with the liberty to dispose of them as I should think fit.  I have carefully perused them three times.  The style is very plain and simple; and the only fault I find is, that the author, after the manner of travellers, is a little too circumstantial. 



  • By the advice of several worthy persons, to whom, with the author’s permission, I communicated these papers, I now venture to send them into the world, hoping they may be, at least for some time, a better entertainment to our young noblemen, than the common scribbles of politics and party.


  • This volume would have been at least twice as large, if I had not made bold to strike out innumerable passages relating to the winds and tides, as well as to the variations and bearings in the several voyages, together with the minute descriptions of the management of the ship in storms, in the style of sailors; likewise the account of longitudes and latitudes; wherein I have reason to apprehend, that Mr. Gulliver may be a little dissatisfied. 


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