Rhetorical Strategy

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American Cannon Literary Circles (AC). Assignment:You will choose a different book to read for each round of literary circles.These circles are representative of college-level discussions.Each round will be different, and you will be expected to participate in a way that shows you have read and studied the novel.As you read, make note of important characters, recurring themes, conflicts, how setting influences the plot, and major events within the novel.Be prepared to share specific citatio34604

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Rhetorical Strategy

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1. Rhetorical Strategy Hyperbole – exaggeration in order to make or prove a point I’m so hungry, I could eat a horse! Exaggeration to prove how hungry I am.

2. American Cannon Literary Circles (AC) Assignment: You will choose a different book to read for each round of literary circles. These circles are representative of college-level discussions. Each round will be different, and you will be expected to participate in a way that shows you have read and studied the novel. As you read, make note of important characters, recurring themes, conflicts, how setting influences the plot, and major events within the novel. Be prepared to share specific citations (quotes) or a summary of a situation within the novel in every discussion. Do not rely on SparkNotes. Do not rely on your friend who read the book last six weeks. It’s obvious and you will fail, epically.   List of Books: Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (1860s-1870s) The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1920s) Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck (1930s) A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry (1950s) Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin (1960s) The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien (1960s-1970s)

3. Roles: Each group member is responsible for at least two roles. Connector – The connector links the reading (or argument) to American history and other works or related articles. Questioner – The questioner is always wondering and analyzing and developing questions to present in discussion. Include at least one question focused on the American history connection. Literary Luminary – The literary luminary looks for very cool passages, that is, important sections of the text to savor, reread, analyze, or share them aloud. Illustrator – The illustrator makes things visual -- charts, graphic organizers, stick figures, maps, and sometimes wonderful drawings from emerging artists. Researcher – The researcher seeks answers to questions that go unanswered and presents topics inspired by the text. Include at least one topic focused on the American history connection. Issues seeker – The issues seeker pulls out debatable topics inspired by the text and helps establish the opposing sides. Reference similar topics debated in America either past or present. Pro-thinker – The pro-thinker summarizes the arguments and develops a position for the pro-side of the arguments presented in the text or developed by the issues seeker. Con-thinker – The con-thinker summarizes the arguments and develops a position for the con-side of the arguments presented in the text or developed by the issues seeker. The directions are simple: read the articles through the roles, take some notes, and come prepared to talk about it all. I have deliberately not defined "it."

4. 7 Modes of Discourse 7 = a number mode = method, form discourse = formal conversation

5. You will add these under the Rhetorical Strategies Tab 7 Modes of Discourse Gallery Walk Walk around and read the different slides. Copy down the information to your rhetorical strategies tab. Think about how each mode is different from the others. Think about how you might use each mode in your own writing.

6. Narration and Description - develops an idea or makes a point by telling a story or anecdote What happened? What did it look like?

7. Process Analysis – dividing into a series of steps to understand how to do something better How do you do it?

8. Comparison and Contrast – popular and convenient way of organizing an essay/article to highlight important ways in which two things or processes can be similar yet different How is it similar or different?

9. Division and Classification – method of organizing an explanation or argument by dividing the topic into distinct parts or classes and discussing the characteristics of those classes What kind of subdivisions does it contain?

10. Definition: identifies and gives the qualities of a person, object, institution, pattern of behavior, or political theory in a way that highlights its special characteristics How would you define/characterize it?

11. Cause and Effect: explains or persuades by analyzing cause-and-effect relationships Why did it happen? What happened as a result?

12. Persuasion and Argument: using language to get readers to accept opinions, beliefs, or point of views How can you prove it?

13. Modes of Discourse – Reflect Why might it be useful to recognize the mode of discourse an author is writing in? How might knowing the modes of discourse enhance your own writings?

14. Narration and Description What did your reading say about narration and description? How do the following terms apply to this type of discourse? Purpose Audience Strategies

15. “The Veil” p. 41 What is the author’s purpose? Who is the audience? What strategies did the author use? What were their affect?

16. The Jilting of Granny Weatherall? p. 85-95 What is the author’s purpose? Support with text evidence. Who is the audience? Support with text evidence. What strategies did the author use? What were their affect? Support with text evidence. In which mode of discourse is this written? How does this advance the author’s purpose?

17. Process Analysis Coming soon!

18. Comparison and Contrast Coming soon!

19. Division and Classification Coming soon!

20. Definition Coming soon!

21. Cause and Effect Coming soon!

22. Persuasion and Argument Coming soon!

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