Student 2 0 can you hear me now engaging 21 st century students
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Student 2.0… Can You Hear Me Now? Engaging 21 st Century Students. Lisa Nimz, Skokie School District 68 Jerry Michel, Lincolnwood School District 74. “You don’t have any right to read my Facebook page! That’s like invading my privacy!” - Eighth Grader, (Ironically) Anonymous.

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Student 2 0 can you hear me now engaging 21 st century students

Student 2.0…Can You Hear Me Now?Engaging 21st Century Students

Lisa Nimz, Skokie School District 68

Jerry Michel, Lincolnwood School District 74


“You don’t have any right to read my Facebook page! That’s like invading my privacy!”

-Eighth Grader, (Ironically) Anonymous


“You want my status update? I'm about to hang up on you.”

-Paul R. La Monica, CNNMoney.com editor, when harassed (over the phone) by a relative about not being on Facebook


Unlike oral, “living” speech, Socrates saw the inflexible muteness of written language to be the doom of the dialogic process, the heart of education.

-Maryanne Wolf, in Proust and the Squid


Google has given us the world at our fingertips, but speed and ubiquity are the not the same as actually knowing something.

-Peter Cookson, board member of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills


“We are not only and ubiquity are the not the same as actually what we read; we are how we read.”

-Maryanne Wolf, author, Proust and the Squid


We teach in an increasingly wired world
We teach in an increasingly wired world and ubiquity are the not the same as actually


In a land of ipads kindles and texting
In a land of and ubiquity are the not the same as actually IPads, Kindles, and texting


Can literacy compete with technology
Can literacy compete with technology? and ubiquity are the not the same as actually


Perhaps new technology simply provides new genres
Perhaps, new technology simply provides new genres… and ubiquity are the not the same as actually



This is your brain on tech
This is your brain on tech our students.

Any questions?



Deep reading has become a chore
“Deep reading has become a chore” our students.

Our ability to interpret text, to make the rich mental connections that form when we read deeply and without distraction, remains largely disengaged.

-Nicholas Carr, author ofThe Big Switch, Rewiring the World from Edison to Google


Growing up with harry potter
Growing Up with Harry Potter our students.

2001: Sorcerer’s Stone

2010: Half Blood Prince


So we aren t getting smarter
So, we aren’t getting smarter? our students.

  • The paradox of the human brain and automaticity: we build vast, intricate circuits… and simultaneously forget that we are building them


What really matters
What really matters? our students.


Inside einstein s brain with edison
Inside Einstein’s Brain with Edison our students.

  • Genius is one percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration

  • Why myelin matters:

    • Deep practice +

    • Error recognition +

    • Strategies to correct =

    • Expertise development



Analog vs digital
Analog vs. Digital use duct tape wisely


“I advise my students to listen carefully the moment they decide to take no more mathematics courses. They might be able to hear the sound of closing doors.”

-James Caballero, CAIP Quarterly


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