Mypyramid steps to a healthier you
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MyPyramid: Steps To A Healthier You. Presented by Janice Hermann, PhD, RD/LD OCES Adult and Older Adult Nutrition Specialist. MyPyramid. USDA MyPyramid: Steps to a Healthier You Part of an overall food guidance system

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Mypyramid steps to a healthier you

MyPyramid: Steps To A Healthier You

Presented by

Janice Hermann, PhD, RD/LD

OCES Adult and Older Adult Nutrition Specialist


Mypyramid

MyPyramid

  • USDA MyPyramid: Steps to a Healthier You

    • Part of an overall food guidance system

    • Incorporates the recommendations from the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.


Mypyramid1

MyPyramid

  • MyPryamid symbolizes a personalized approach to healthy eating and physical activity.

  • The MyPyramid symbol helps remind people to make healthy food choices and to be active every day


Mypyramid illustrates

MyPyramid Illustrates

  • Personalization shown by the person on the steps and the slogan.

  • To find a personalized recommendation of the kinds and amounts of food to eat each day go to www.MyPyramid.gov


Mypyramid illustrates1

MyPyramid Illustrates

  • Gradual Improvement encouraged by the slogan “Steps to a Healthier You.”

  • Suggests that individuals can benefit from taking small steps to improve their diet and lifestyle each day.


Mypyramid illustrates2

MyPyramid Illustrates

  • Physical Activity represented by the steps and the person climbing them, as a reminder of the importance of daily physical activity.


Mypyramid illustrates3

MyPyramid Illustrates

  • Varietysymbolized by the six color bands representing the five food groups of MyPyramid and oils. Foods from all groups are needed each day for good health.

GRAINS

VEGETABLES

FRUITS

OILS

MILK

MEAT & BEANS


Mypyramid illustrates4

MyPyramid Illustrates

  • Proportionalityshown by the different widths of the food group bands. The widths suggest how much food a person should choose from each group. The widths are just a general guide, not exact proportions.


Mypyramid illustrates5

MyPyramid Illustrates

  • Moderation represented by the narrowing of each food group from bottom to top. The wider base stands for foods with little or no solid fats or added sugars. These should be selected more often.


Mypyramid calorie levels

MyPyramid Calorie Levels

  • MyPyramid calorie levels are based on gender, age, and physical activity level.


Food intake patterns

Food Intake Patterns

  • MyPyramid food intake patterns are based on recommended calorie levels.


Grains

Grains

  • What foods are in the grain group?

    • Any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley or another cereal grain is a grain product.

    • Grains are divided into 2 subgroups:

      • Whole grains

      • Refined grains


Grains1

Grains

  • How many grain foods are needed daily?

    • Amount needed from grain group depends on gender, age, and level of physical activity.

    • 6 oz. of grains recommended daily for a 2,000 calorie diet.

    • Most Americans consume enough grains, but few are whole grains. At least ½ of all the grains eaten should be whole grains.


Grains2

Grains

  • What counts as an ounce equivalent of grains?

    • In general the following can be considered as a 1 ounce equivalent from the grains group:

      • 1 slice of bread

      • 1 cup of ready-to-eat cereal

      • ½ cup of cooked rice, cooked pasta, or cooked cereal


Vegetables

Vegetables

  • What foods are in the vegetable group?

    • Any vegetable or 100% vegetable juice is in the vegetable group.

    • Vegetables are organized into 5 subgroups, based on their nutrient content:

      • Dark green vegetables

      • Orange vegetables

      • Dry beans and peas

      • Starchy vegetables

      • Other vegetables


Vegetables1

Vegetables

  • How many vegetables are needed daily?

    • Amount needed from vegetable group depends on gender, age, and level of physical activity.

    • 2 ½ cups of vegetables recommended daily for a 2,000 calorie diet.


Vegetables2

Vegetables

  • How many vegetables are needed daily?

    • Vegetable choices should be selected from the vegetable subgroups. It is not necessary to eat vegetables from each subgroup daily.

    • However, over a week, try to consume the amounts listed from each subgroup.


Vegetables3

Vegetables

  • What counts as a cup of vegetables?

    • In general, the following can be considered as 1 cup from the vegetable group:

      • 1 cup of raw or cooked vegetables or vegetable juice

      • 2 cups of raw leafy greens can be considered as 1 cup from the vegetable group


Fruits

Fruits

  • What foods are in the fruit group?

    • Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the fruit group.


Fruits1

Fruits

  • How much fruit is needed daily?

    • Amount needed from fruit group depends on gender, age, and level of physical activity.

    • 2 cups of fruits recommended daily for a 2,000 calorie diet.


Fruits2

Fruits

  • What counts as a cup of fruit?

    • In general, the following can be considered as 1 cup from the fruit group:

      • 1 cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice

      • ½ cup of dried fruit


Mypyramid steps to a healthier you

Milk

  • What foods are in the milk group?

    • All fluid milk products and many foods made from milk are considered part of this food group.

    • Foods made from milk that retain their calcium content are part of the group, while foods made from milk that have little to no calcium, such as cream cheese, cream, and butter, are not.

    • Most milk group choices should be fat-free or low-fat


Mypyramid steps to a healthier you

Milk

  • How much from the milk group is needed daily?

    • Amount needed from milk group depends on gender, age, and level of physical activity.

    • 3 cups of milk recommended daily for a 2,000 calorie diet.


Mypyramid steps to a healthier you

Milk

  • What counts as 1 cup in the milk group?

    • In general the following can be considered as 1 cup from the milk group:

      • 1 cup of milk or yogurt

      • 1 ½ ounces of natural cheese

      • 2 ounces of processed cheese


Meat beans

Meat & Beans

  • What foods are in the meat & beans group?

    • All foods made from meat, poultry, fish, dry beans or peas, eggs, nuts, and seeds are considered part of this group. Dry beans and peas are part of this group as well as the vegetable group.

    • Most meat and poultry choices should be lean or low-fat. Fish, nuts, and seeds contain healthy oils, so choose these foods frequently instead of meat or poultry.


Meat beans1

Meat & Beans

  • How much from the meat & beans group is needed daily?

    • Amount needed from mean & bean group depends on gender, age, and level of physical activity.

    • 5 ½ oz. of meat & beans recommended daily for a 2,000 calorie diet.

    • Most people eat enough food from this group, but need to make leaner and more varied selections of these foods.


Meat beans2

Meat & Beans

  • What counts as an ounce equivalent in the meat & beans group?

    • In general the following can be considered as a 1 ounce equivalent from the meat and beans group:

      • 1 ounce of meat, poultry or fish

      • ¼ cup cooked dry beans

      • 1 egg

      • 1 tablespoon of peanut butter

      • ½ ounce of nuts or seeds


Mypyramid steps to a healthier you

Oils

  • What are oils?

    • Oils are fats that are liquid at room temperature, like the vegetable oils used in cooking.

    • Oils come from many different plants and from fish. Some common oils are canola oil, corn oil, cotton seed oil, olive oil, safflower oil, soybean oil and sunflower oil.


Mypyramid steps to a healthier you

Oils

  • What are oils?

    • A number of foods are naturally high in oils, like nuts, olives, some fish, and avocados.

    • Foods that are mainly oil include mayonnaise, certain salad dressings, and soft (tub or squeeze) margarine with no trans fats.


Mypyramid steps to a healthier you

Oils

  • What are oils?

    • Most oils are high in monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats, and low in saturated fats.

    • Oils from plant sources do not contain any cholesterol. In fact, no foods from plants sources contain cholesterol.

    • A few plant oils, however, including coconut oil and palm kernel oil, are high in saturated fats and for nutritional purposes should be considered to be solid fats.


Solid fats

Solid Fats

  • How are solid fats different from oils?

    • Solid fats contain more saturated fats and/or trans fats than oils.

    •  Oils contain more monounsaturated (MUFA) and polyunsaturated (PUFA) fats.

    •  Saturated fats, trans fats, and cholesterol tend to raise “bad” (LDL) cholesterol levels in the blood, which in turn increases the risk for heart disease.


Mypyramid steps to a healthier you

Oils

  • Why is it important to consume oils?

    • Most of the fats you eat should be polyunsaturated (PUFA) or monounsaturated (MUFA) fats.

    •  Oils are the major source of MUFAs and PUFAs in the diet. PUFAs contain some fatty acids that are necessary for health—called “essential fatty acids.”

    • While consuming some oil is needed for health, oils still contain calories.


Mypyramid steps to a healthier you

Oils

  • How much from oil is needed daily?

    • Amount of oil recommended depends on gender, age, and level of physical activity.

    • 6 t. oil recommended daily for a 2,000 calorie diet.


Discretionary calories

Discretionary Calories

  • What are discretionary calories

    • Each person has a total calorie “budget.” This budget can be divided into “essentials” and “extras.”

    •  In a calorie budget, the “essentials” are the minimum calories required to meet your nutrient needs.  By selecting the lowest fat and no-sugar-added forms of foods in each food group you would make the best nutrient “buys.”


Discretionary calories1

Discretionary Calories

  • What are discretionary calories

    • Depending on the foods you choose, you may be able to spend more calories than the amount required to meet your nutrient needs.

    •  These calories are the “extras” that can be used on luxuries like solid fats, added sugars, and alcohol, or on more food from any food group.  They are your “discretionary calories.”


Discretionary calories2

Discretionary Calories

  • What are discretionary calories

    • Most discretionary calorie allowances are very small, between 100 and 300 calories, especially for those who are not physically active.

    •  For many people, the discretionary calorie allowance is totally used by the foods they choose in each food group, such as higher fat meats, cheeses, whole milk, or sweetened bakery products. 


Discretionary calories3

Discretionary Calories

  • Discretionary calories can be used for:

    • More food from any food group than the food guide recommends.

    • Foods that contain solid fats or added sugars (whole milk, cheese, sausage, biscuits, sweetened cereal, and sweetened yogurt).

    • Added fats or sweeteners to foods (sauces, salad dressings, sugar, syrup, and butter).

    • Foods or drinks that are mostly fats, caloric sweeteners, or alcohol (candy, soda, wine, and beer).


Discretionary calories4

Discretionary Calories

  • How many discretionary calories?

    • Amount of discretionary calories depends on gender, age, and level of physical activity.

  • Physical activity increases calorie needs, those who are more physically active need more total calories and have a larger discretionary calorie allowance.

  • Discretionary calorie allowance is part of total estimated calorie needs, not in addition to total calorie needs.

  • 267 discretionary calories recommended for a 2,000 calorie diet.


Physical activity

Physical Activity

  • What is physical activity?

    • Physical activity simply means movement of the body that uses energy.

    •  Walking, gardening, briskly pushing a baby stroller, climbing the stairs, playing soccer, or dancing the night away are all good examples of being active.

    •  For health benefits, physical activity should be moderate or vigorous and add up to at least 30 minutes a day.


Physical activity1

Physical Activity

  • Why is physical activity important?

    • Being physically active is a key element in living a longer, healthier, happier life. It can help relieve stress and can provide an overall feeling of well-being.

    •  Physical activity can also help you achieve and maintain a healthy weight and lower risk for chronic disease.


Physical activity2

Physical Activity

  • How much physical activity is needed?

    • At a minimum, do moderate intensity activity for 30 minutes most days, or preferably every day. This is in addition to your usual daily activities.

    • About 60 minutes a day of moderate physical activity may be needed to prevent weight gain.

    • For those who have lost weight, at least 60 to 90 minutes a day may be needed to maintain the weight loss.


Physical activity3

Physical Activity

  • How many discretionary calories?

    • While 30 minutes a day of moderate intensity physical activities provide health benefits, being active for longer or doing more vigorous activities can provide even greater health benefits.

    •  No matter what activity you choose, it can be done all at once, or divided into two or three parts during the day. Even 10-minutes bouts of activity count toward your total.


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