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People Management. Perception in the Eye of the Beholder. Count the F’s in the statement in the box. The Ideal Engineer (Some thoughts from Eugene Raudsepp, President, Princeton Creative Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ). What managers expect of engineers Good grasp of technical fundamentals

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People Management

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People

Management


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Perception in the Eye of the Beholder

Count the F’s in the statement in the box.


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The Ideal Engineer

(Some thoughts from Eugene Raudsepp, President, Princeton Creative Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ)


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  • What managers expect of engineers

  • Good grasp of technical fundamentals

  • Up-to-date knowledge of pertinent fields

  • Ability to solve complex technical problems

  • Good judgment and objectivity in approaching problems

  • Ability to think systematically in abstract concepts

  • Capability to choose the most efficient methods and the latest developments in the solution of technical problems

  • Ability to devise new or improved methods, materials, and equipment

  • Capacity for adapting available methods and equipment to meet new requirements

  • Ability to plan and organize work so that exact requirements and specifications of a project are known before work is begun

  • Sufficient flexibility to anticipate and make provisions for meeting unforeseen difficulties and for checking the accuracy of data and methods used

  • Willingness to work under pressure and to produce outstanding results under adverse circumstances

  • Promptness in completing assignments

  • Capacity for completing assignments rapidly without compromising standards of quality

  • Ability to change methods and work schedules to meet deadlines, without reducing the value of results

  • Willingness to sustain productivity without supervisory prodding

  • Readiness to put in long hours if necessary

  • Ability to give as well as to follow directions


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  • Personal qualities of the ideal engineer

  • When 85 engineering managers were asked to rate the desirability of various personal qualities of engineers, the following results were obtained. The numbers shown are the number of mentions for each quality.

  • Congeniality, compatibility, cooperativeness, overall pleasant personality (42)

  • Drive, aggressiveness, ambition (28)

  • Persistence, perseverance, sustained productivity, follow-through (28)

  • Loyalty, dependability, stability, honesty, conscientiousness (26)

  • Initiative, self-starting (20)

  • Creativity, inventiveness (20)

  • Enthusiasm, interest (19)

  • Communication skills (18)

  • Analytical ability (18)

  • Sound judgment, clear thinking (17)

  • Willingness to accept responsibility (17)

  • Willingness to accept any assignment (15)

  • Organizational ability (14)

  • Good workmanship (14)

  • Interest in keeping up-to-date in field (14)

  • Ability to carry on with minimum of supervision (10)

  • Manager's Complaints

  • Tend to get sidetracked into what interests them without regard to the needs of the organization

  • Approach their jobs with unrealistically high expectations, especially career progress. They confront management rather than work with it.


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Homework

Do the Ideal Engineer Survey from the Web Page


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MISSION STATEMENTS

You have seen some of the character traits that make up the "ideal engineer". These might also be described as the "principles" that lie at the center of the engineer. Now is a perfect time to use some of these principles that you hold near and dear to develop your own Personal Mission Statement.

http://www2.franklincovey.com/mission/index.html


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Focus of Personal Mission Statement

·       What you want to be (Character)

·       What you want to do (Contributions/Achievements)

·       Values or Principles upon which being and doing are based

Benefits From Personal Mission Statement

·       Gives sense of Mission

·       Gives Essence of your own pro-activity

·       Direction to set Goals

·       Written Constitution based on correct principles

·       A constitution against which to test decisions for effective use of time, talents, energies, resources.


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OK! LET'S DEVELOP YOUR PERSONAL MISSION STATEMENT

MISSION STATEMENT

ROLES IN LIFE

GOALS FOR EACH ROLE

ACTION STEPS TO ACCOMPLISH EACH GOAL (Results not just Activity)

Start by identifying Roles and Goals, then work back to Mission Statement

What are Some Roles You Now Play?

Husband, Father, Teacher, Administrator, Missionary

What Goal for each Role?

Be Attentive Husband, Date at least one/week


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Now Prioritize Roles


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Example of a Personal Mission Statement

"On my honor I will do my bestTo do my duty to God and my countryand to obey the Scout Law;To help other people at all times;To keep myself physically strong,mentally awake, and morally straight.

How about a Corporate Mission Statement?

Sets Direction - Pathfinding

Should there be a link between Personal & Corporate Missions?


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The purpose of the Boy Scouts of America, incorporated on February 8, 1910, and chartered by Congress in 1916, is to provide an educational program for boys and young adults to build character, to train in the responsibilities of participating citizenship, and to develop personal fitness.


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PCL Model


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"Stakeholders"

customers, owners, stockholders, suppliers, employees

"Pathfinding“

Mission: Why do we exist? What are we all about? What is our purpose? What stakeholder needs will we attempt to meet or not meet?

Vision: What do we want to become? Where are we going? Where do we want to be one, three, five or any number of years from now?

Values: How will we behave and treat our stakeholders and each other? How will we go about making decisions? What will guide our actions?

Strategy: What actions will we take to meet our mission? What actions will we take to accomplish our vision?


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Aligning

making sure that all of the processes and systems are set up to reinforce each other rather than to be a deterrent to the company's progress.


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Empowerment.


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  • Results

  • "did the mission get done?"

  • metrics measurement is needed

  • an assessment of that measure is required

  • ties back to the stakeholder by determining if they are satisfied with the outcome.

  • This process repeats itself with ever increasing levels of quality and satisfaction.


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You've Been Promoted to Manager: Now What?

(Ref. Journal of Metals, September 1982)

  • Questions for Your Supervisor:

  • On what basis will your performance be judged?

  • What deadlines are pending?

  • What are your most important responsibilities?

  • Are there any records that will indicate present employee moral?

  • Are monthly activity reports required? In what form? Sent to whom?

  • What periodic meetings are required?

  • Is the budget fixed?

  • Any safety or security issues?

  • Your Homework:

  • Review department mission and vision statements

  • Identify the basic long term goals of department

  • Identify coordinated efforts with others

  • Start keeping a written record of your views and how they change over time

  • Review subordinates job descriptions


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You've Been Promoted to Manager: Now What?

(Ref. Journal of Metals, September 1982)

  • First Private Meeting with Subordinates:

  • Ask him/her to describe dept function as they see it

  • Ask what they think their role is or should be

  • What are their personal goals

  • What strengths do they see in themselves

  • First Group Meeting:

  • Establish yourself as catalyst not autocrat

  • Make them aware of deadlines tasks and priorities

  • Explain organizational chart

  • Set up MBO


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You've Been Promoted to Manager: Now What?

(Ref. Journal of Metals, September 1982)

Other Useful Considerations

Communications

·    Encourage employees to inform you of bad news, keep your supervisor informed before someone else does, have a plan ready: DBMPBMR

·    Share company plans, schedules, and perspectives with your subordinates.

·    Be available for counseling

Recognition

·    Never forget the value of an honest thank you.

·    If you are unsure about whether recognition or criticism is appropriate, always err on the side of giving recognition and withholding criticism

Training

·    Encourage training and Education

Promotions

·    Be prepared to see the successful subordinate move up. Don't hold anyone back. The success of your employees will reflect directly on you.

Department Review

·    Review complete MBO at least every 6 months.

·    Supplement with charts, graphs; it will help focus everyone

Self Analysis

·    Survey employees, they should be given the opportunity to respond anonymously and voluntarily

·    Analyze yourself


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A Supervisor's Responsibilities Within the Organization


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  • Responsibility to Employee

  • Provide leadership and support

  • Establish a warm and trusting working climate

  • Handle employee problems promptly

  • Be fair

  • Explain all matters connected with job

  • Train

  • Assume role of counselor on occasions

  • Distribute all department amenities fairly

  • Discuss proposed changes before they occur

  • Maintain a safe and clean work area

  • Provide sound policies

  • Explain fringe benefits etc.

  • Orient new workers

  • Coordinate and plan work so that it is as stable and predictable as possible

  • Develop good moral

  • Stand up for employee when being treated arbitrarily from above

  • Responsibility to Higher Management

  • Serve as the "linking pin" between higher management and employees

  • Plan the work of department

  • Coordinate work with other departments

  • Select and train employees

  • Make work assignment

  • Interpret and implement management policies

  • Understand and communicate all aspects of operations

  • Make production decisions

  • Maintain moral and discipline

  • Keep control of costs

  • Send recommendations for change upward

  • Motivate


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  • Responsibility to Staff Departments

  • Comply with reasonable requests for information

  • Utilize whatever standardized reporting forms are necessary per judgment of staff managers

  • Listen to the counsel of staff managers

  • Consult with appropriate staff managers for their special expertise

  • Coordinate with staff managers where task requirements deem it necessary

  • Responsibility to Other Supervisors

  • Coordinate whatever work flow or paperwork that needs to be exchanged among supervisors

  • Communicate with other departments about mutual needs and problems

  • Give them support as members of the same management team

  • Coordinate policy interpretations with other departments to assure consistency and uniformity

  • Responsibility to Unions

  • Comply with reasonable requests for information

  • Meet reasonable requests

  • Within your control, set up a win-win environment

  • Be prepared to negotiate


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DON’T assume that your subordinates see their job as you see it; don’t expect people to be mind readers.

DO tell your subordinates what is expected of them; clarify job duties; provide standards, yardsticks, goals; give clear directions.

DON’T operate under the philosophy of “they know things are OK unless I tell them otherwise”

Do let all of your people know how they are doing; furnish frequent measures of progress toward goals; help them to “keep track” of their job performance.

DON’T let people fumble along without help; don’t let wrong work habits get established.

DO instruct, train, guide and follow-up; help people overcome weaker points of performance.

DON’T do people’s jobs for them; don’t SNOOPERvise.

DO give all of your people enough responsibility, authority and freedom for decision-making to challenge them and bring out the best in them.

DON’T expect people to be perfect; don;’t look for a “scapegoat”; don’t overemphasize punishment and penalties.

DO try to understand mistakes; find out what caused them; show real interest in remedies; take action to prevent recurrences.


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DON’T let “little “Problems grow into big ones.

DO pay attention to “minor” complaints; have a real “open door” policy; show genuine interest in the other person’s problems; correct the situation as soon as you can.

DON’T be a flatterer, a grouch, or a chronic faultfinder; don’t wait until a person dies, transfers, or retires to give them due credit.

Do make full use of sincere praise; show your appreciation for good work; let your supervisor know when one of your employees or your entire group does outstanding work.

DON’T let people get the impression that their jobs are like digging holes just to fill them up again, or like trying to fill a leaking bucket.

DO emphasize the importance of the job; make it meaningful; explain “the why” of the job; show where the job fits into the total picture; remove monotony and boredom as much as you can.

DON’T “hide their lights under a basket”; don’t hold people back; don’t take the easy way out.

DO help to uncover the buried abilities of people; develop your men and women; recommend pay increases, transfers, and promotions when appropriate; go to bat for you team members.

DON’T make people feel stupid, cause them to “lose face”, or ridicule them.

DO help your people correct their mistakes; be constructive when criticizing; and do it privately; welcome questions and try to answer them in a straightforward manner.

DON’T TREAT PEOPLE LIKE MACHINES, STATISTICS, “THINGS”, OR TOOLS.

DO TAKE AN ACTIVE INTEREST IN YOUR SUBORDINATES; SHOW YOUR RESPECT FOR THE DIGNITY AND UNIQUENESS OF EACH PERSON; AND TRY TO UNDERSTAND THEIR INDIVIDUAL VIEWPOINTS AND NEEDS.


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Theory X

Theory Y

Beyond Theory Y

Theory X assumes that people dislike work and must be coerced, controlled, and directed toward organizational goals. Furthermore, most people prefer to be treated this way, so hey can avoid responsibility

Theory Y - the integration of goals - emphasizes that average person's intrinsic interest in his/her work, their desire to be self-directing and to seek responsibility, and their capacity to be creative in solving business problems

Contingency Theory - the best possibility for managerial action probably is in tailoring the organization to fit the task and people

Need:

·Established lines of authority

·Clearly defined jobs

·Authority equal to responsibility

Need:

·Participative style

·Involvement in decisions

·Self motivation

Empowerment

Need:

·Achieve a sense of competence

·Fit between task and organization

·A sense of competence continues to motive when each progressive goal is met


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Incentive Based Management

The Lincoln Electric Incentive Management system is interesting first because it is an incentive system based on the premise that the better the company does, the more each employee will share in that prosperity. And secondly, Lincoln is a major company in the Welding Industry.


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BOTH WIN MANAGEMENT STYLES

Steven Covey “7 Habits of Highly Effective People”

SIX PARADIGMS OF HUMAN INTERACTION

Win/LoseLose/WinLose/Lose

WinWin/WinWin/Win or No Deal


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SIX PARADIGMS OF HUMAN INTERACTION

Win/Lose Lose/WinLose/Lose

WinWin/WinWin/Win or No Deal

WIN/LOSE(Authoritarian Style)

·     Use Position, Power, Credentials, Possessions, or Personality To Get Their Way

·     Compare Children (Others) and Withhold Patience, Understanding or Love Based on Comparison

·     Use Conditional Love - Value Doesn't Lie Within Child (Associate), It Lies Outside Them. They Are Intrinsically Not Valuable, Lovable

·     Are Over Competitive, Over Achievers

·     Are Peer Acceptance Cautious (Teens)

·     Are Academic Achievers

·     Are Athletic Achievers, Sports Fanatics (Team Must Win)

·     Are Litigious (suing - win at someone else's expense)

·     "Who's Winning In Your Marriage (Or Other Relationship)?" If Both People Aren't Winning, Both Are Loosing


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SIX PARADIGMS OF HUMAN INTERACTION

Win/Lose Lose/WinLose/Lose

WinWin/WinWin/Win or No Deal

LOSE/WIN PEOPLE:

·     Tend To Give In, Give Up

·     Are Peacemakers, Will Do Anything To Keep The Peace

·     Seek Strength From Popularity, People Pleasers

·     Have Little Courage To Express Their Own Feelings (Easily Intimidated)

·     Must Be A Nice Guy, Even If Nice Guys Finish Last

·     Bury A Lot Of Feelings, They Come Back To Haunt

·     Based On Insecurities

·     Tend To Swing Back And Forth From Win/Lose (Inconsideration) to Lose/Win (Indulgence)


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SIX PARADIGMS OF HUMAN INTERACTION

Win/Lose Lose/WinLose/Lose

WinWin/WinWin/Win or No Deal

LOSE/LOSE PEOPLE:

·     Are Two Win/Lose People Butting Heads

·     Are Determined, Stubborn, Ego-invested People

·     Are Vindictive "Get Back", "Get Even" People

·     Are The Philosophy Of War People (Hawks)

·     Are Obsessed With The "Enemy"

·     Are Highly Dependent People

·     If Nobody Ever Wins, Perhaps Being A Loser Isn't So Bad.

·     Or Is It?

WIN PEOPLE:

·        Secure Their Own Ends, And Leave It Up To Others To Secure Their Own Fate


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SIX PARADIGMS OF HUMAN INTERACTION

Win/Lose Lose/WinLose/Lose

WinWin/WinWin/Win or No Deal

WIN/WIN

·     Seeks Mutual Benefit In All Human Interactions

·     Sees Life As Cooperative, Not Competitive

·     Based On The View That There Is Plenty For All

·     Negotiation Until Both Win

·     Not My Way, Not Your Way, But A Better Way

(see "Both Win Management" by Karrass & Glasser)

WIN/WIN OR NO DEAL PEOPLE:

·     Agree That If We Can Not Find An Option That Would Benefit Both We Will Not Make A Deal

·     Are Free From Having To Manipulate Because They Recognize "No Deal" As An Option


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SIX PARADIGMS OF HUMAN INTERACTION

Win/Lose Lose/WinLose/Lose

WinWin/WinWin/Win or No Deal

WHICH OPTION IS BEST?(It Depends)

LOSE/LOSE: Never Good

WIN/LOSE: Usually Not Good Except In Emergency

LOSE/WIN: Usually Not Good Except Occasionally To Maintain Relations When All Else Fails (Think About If The Relationship Was Good In The First Place)

WIN: Does Nothing To Build Relationships

WIN/WIN: Good

WIN/WIN OR NO DEAL: Great


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FIVE DIMENSION FOR WIN/WIN

1) CHARACTER 2) RELATIONSHIPS 3) AGREEMENTS

4) SUPPORTIVE SYSTEMS 5) PROCESSES

1)CHARACTER Traits Required

A) Integrity (The Value We Place On Ourselves)

The Win Must Be Harmonious With Our Values

Willingness To Make and Keep Commitments

Trust Others, Others Trust Us

B) Maturity

(The Balance Between Consideration and Courage) C) Abundance Mentality

There Is Plenty For Everyone


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FIVE DIMENSION FOR WIN/WIN

1) CHARACTER2) RELATIONSHIPS 3) AGREEMENTS

4) SUPPORTIVE SYSTEMS 5) PROCESSES

SCARCITY MENTALITY PEOPLE:

·      Have Difficult Time Sharing Recognition, Credit, Power, Profit

·      Have Difficulty Being Happy For Others Success

·      Get Self Worth From Comparing With Others

·      Have Secret Hope That Others Might Fail

·      Are Possessive Of Things And People

·      Look On Differences Of Opinion As Signs Of Insubordination and Disloyalty

·      WHICH CHARACTER TRAITS DO YOUR MENTORS HAVE?


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FIVE DIMENSION FOR WIN/WIN

1) CHARACTER 2) RELATIONSHIPS3) AGREEMENTS

4) SUPPORTIVE SYSTEMS 5) PROCESSES

2)RELATIONSHIPS

The Best Relationship Is An Already Established - High Emotional Bank Account Relationship

Negotiating With A Win/Lose Person

1) Focus On Your Circle Of Influence

2) Make Deposits - Courtesy, Respect

3) Stay Longer In Communications

4) Listen More, Greater Depth

5) Express Yourself With Courage

6) Don't Be Reactive

7) Keep Expressing Desire For Win/Win

8) Remember, No Deal Is Always An Option If It Just Can't Work Out


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FIVE DIMENSION FOR WIN/WIN

1) CHARACTER 2) RELATIONSHIPS 3) AGREEMENTS

4) SUPPORTIVE SYSTEMS 5) PROCESSES

3)AGREEMENTS

Desired Results (Not Methods) - Identify what is to be done and when

Guidelines - Specify the parameters (principles, policies, etc.) within which results are to be accomplished

Resources - Identify human, financial, technical etc. support available to help

Accountability - Set up the standards and time for performance

Consequences - Good and Bad, What will happen

THEN DON'T HOVER OVER OR CHECK ON

That Is Authoritarian, Win/Lose Style - The Result of A Low Bank Account

It is more ennobling to the human spirit to let people judge themselves than to judge them. Judge not lest ye be judged


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FIVE DIMENSION FOR WIN/WIN

1) CHARACTER 2) RELATIONSHIPS 3) AGREEMENTS

4) SUPPORTIVE SYSTEMS5) PROCESSES

4) SUPPORTIVE SYSTEMS

The system or organization has to support Win/Win. Saying Win/Win and then setting up competition (Win/Lose) destroys the effort.

·     Competition Between Organizations is OK

·     Competition Within Organization is KO

Example:

Keep family score when bowling

Everyone wins the company trip

The Lincoln Electric Bonus System


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FIVE DIMENSION FOR WIN/WIN

1) CHARACTER 2) RELATIONSHIPS 3) AGREEMENTS

4) SUPPORTIVE SYSTEMS 5) PROCESSES

5) PROCESSES

1) See the problem from the other point of view

Seek to understand (Habit 5)

2) Identify key issues and concerns:

Don't focus on positions or personalities

3) Determine results for a fully acceptable solution

4) Identify new options to achieve results:

Separate the person from the problem, focus on interests/concerns and not personal political positions, invent options for mutual gain, find some external standard or principle that both parties can buy into.


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