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“There Was a Lord Who Lived in This Town” Jerry O’Reilly National Library of Ireland December 2013. “There Was a Lord Who Lived in This Town”. Early Classic Ballads in The Irish Song Tradition. Jerry O’Reilly An Góilín Traditional Singers Club. So who was Child?. Tom Munnelly.

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“There Was a Lord

Who Lived in This Town”

Jerry O’Reilly

National Library of Ireland

December 2013


There was a lord who lived in this town

“There Was a Lord Who Lived in This Town”

Early Classic Ballads in

The Irish Song Tradition

Jerry O’Reilly

An Góilín Traditional Singers Club






The well below the valley

The Maid and the Palmer (Child 21)

The Well Below the Valley

For a gentleman he was passin’ by, he axed a drink as he got dry

At the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes O

My cup it is in overflow, an’ if I do stoop I may fall in

At the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes O

Well if your true love was passin’ by, you’d fill him a drink if he got dry

At the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes O

(She swore by grass and swore by corn, that her true love was never born

At the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes O)

(I say fair maid you’re sworin’ wrong, (five bonny children you have borne)

At the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes O)

Well if you’re a man of noble fame, you’ll tell to me the father o’ them

At the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes O


(Two of them by your father dear

At the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes O)

Two of them came by your uncle Dan

At the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes O

Another one by your brother JohnAt the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes O(Well if you’re a man of noble fame, you’ll tell to me what happened to themAt the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes O)(There was two o’ them buried by the kitchen fireAt the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes O)(Two more o’ them buried by the stable doorAt the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes O)(The other was buried by the wellAt the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes O)


Well if you’re a man of noble ‘steem, you’ll tell to me what will happen mysel’At the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes OYou’ll be seven years o ringin’ a bellAt the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes OYou’ll be seven more a-portin’ in HellAt the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes OI’ll be seven year o-ringin’ a bell, but the Lord above may save my soul, from portin’ in HellAt the well below the valley O, green grows the lily O, right among the bushes O


Corney mcdaid
Corney McDaid me what will happen mysel’

Corney McDaid singing in the Brass Rail Bar, Buncrana, 1985

Photo: John P. Coyle, Derry

Corney McDaid and Kevin Mitchell

in the Brass Rail Bar, October 1987.

Photo: Jimmy McBride


False lover john

Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight (Child 4) me what will happen mysel’

False Lover John

False lover John he courted me for every hour in the day

And he courted me to such a degree as I hadn’t one word to say

“It’s take ye of your father’s gold and all of your mother’s money

And steal the keys of your father’s stable, with his thirty steeds and three”

So she took of her father’s gold and all of her mother’s money

And she stole the keys of her father’s stable, with his thirty steeds and three

Then they mounted on a white milk steed, and rode on by the clear silvery light of the moon

And they rode ‘til they came to a river bank, and it’s there they did get down

“It’s lie you here Miss Michaeleen, this night along with me

For it’s here I’ve murdered seven King’s daughters and eight one shall be thee”

“But first take off your lovely cloths and leave them on dry land

For they are too fine and costly for to rot on the salt sea sand”


“It’s turn you round False John” she said “and view the green leaves on the tree

For I’d never agree for any young man my naked body to see”

False Lover John he turned around to view the green leaves on the tree

And she threw hers arms around his waist and she flung him into the sea

“It’s reach you in your noble hand and bring me to dry land

And its every vow that ever I made, I’ll double them all in one”

“It’s lie you there False John” she said “and an ill death my you die

For you thought to drown me as I was born and steal my clothes away”

Then she mounted on her white milk steed and rode on by the clear silvery light of the moon

And she rode ‘til she came to her father’s castle and it’s there she did get down

She put the horse into the stable and the gold back where it lay

And there wasn’t a knight in all the castle knew Miss Michaeleen was away


Then up spoke the noble parrot, from the cage wherein it lay the green leaves on the tree

Saying “what did I tell you Miss Michaeleen before you went away”

“It’s hold your tongue my little parrot, and tell no tale on me

And your cage will be made of the beech and gold instead of the hazel tree”

Then up spoke the noble King from the chamber where he lay

Saying “what is disturbing my little parrot, who prattles so long before day”

“Oh the cats they were at my back door, all for to worry me

And I was calling on Michaeleen, to scare the cats away

But when maids are young they do sleep sound and can’t be wakened by me,

So sleep ye on my noble King for the cats they are all scared away”


Tom lenihan
Tom Lenihan the green leaves on the tree

Tom at work on his farm, 1976

Photo: Jim Carroll and Pat McKenzie

Tom telling a yarn, 1976

Photo: Jim Carroll and Pat McKenzie


Lord levett

Lord Lovel (Child 75) the green leaves on the tree

Lord Levett he stood at his stable door and he mounted his snow white steed

Lady Anne sweet belle stood by his side for to bid him his last Godspeed

Lady Anne sweet belle stood by his side for to bid him his last Godspeed

“Oh where are you going Lord Levett” she said “oh where are you going from me”

“I’m going to a land beyond the sea, strange countries I’d like to see”

“I’m going to a land beyond the sea, strange countries I’d like to see”

“How long will you be Lord Levett” she said “how long will you be from me”

“It will be for the case of three long years, Lady Anne sweet belle” said he

“It will be for the case of three long years, Lady Anne sweet belle” said he

“Oh that is too long Lord Levett” she said, “Oh that is too long for me”

“Oh that is too long for two lovers to part and never again to meet”

“Oh that is too long for two lovers to part and never again to meet”

He wasn’t but gone scarcely one short year, when a thought ran into his mind

He knew he had a true lover at home and he dreamt that she had died

He knew he had a true lover at home and he dreamt that she had died

Lord Levett


Lord Levett he mounted his snow white steed and he rode to St. Mary’s square

And there he heard the ringing of bells, and the people were mourning there

And there he heard the ringing of bells, and the people were mourning there

“Oh what is the matter “Lord Levett he cried “Oh what is the matter with thee

Is it any of your friends that is going from home, or any of your friends have died”

Is it any of your friends that is going from home, or any of your friends have died”

“Oh yes oh yes” the captain replied, “the King’s only daughter is dead”

“She died for the sake of a noble young man and Lord Levett it is his name”

“She died for the sake of a noble young man and Lord Levett it is his name”

“Will you open the coffin kind sir” he said “will you open the coffin for me”

“For I’ll never sleep three nights of my life, if I see that she died for me”

“I’ll never sleep three nights of my life, if I see that she died for me”

“Stand back, stand back fair ladies” he said, “and let the cold breeze to thee”

It was then he kissed her pale cold lips as the tears rolled down his cheek

Twas then he kissed her pale cold lips as the tears rolled down his cheek


One of them died supposing tonight, the other one died tomorrow

And out of one, there grew a rose, and the other a bonny sweet briar

And out of one, there grew a rose, and the other a bonny sweet briar

They grew they grew, for seven long years, till they could not grow any higher

They grew they grew, to a true lovers knot, till the red rose covered the briar

They grew they grew, to a true lovers knot, till the red rose covered the briar



The old armchair

Fair Margaret and Sweet William (Child 74) tomorrow

The Old Armchair

Knight William was sitting on his old armchair; Lady Margaret was sitting on his knee,

“My father” she said “would think it a disgrace, for to have me get married unto thee”.

“If that be the way Lady Margaret” he said, “if that be the way said he

“For in three weeks time ‘twill be all to an end, and my brave royal wedding you shall see”

Lady Margaret was sitting on her top room window, and she combing down her yellow long hair

Who would she spy but Knight William and his newly wedded wife, and they going for to take the fresh air

Then she threw away her ivory combs and tied up her yellow long hair

She threw herself down from her top room window, and was never seen there anymore

It was at the dead deaded hour of the night, when all souls they were asleep

In comes the ghost of Lady Margaret, and she stood by Knight William’s bedside


“Knight William, Knight William Knight William” she said, “how fast you were asleep

It’s now you’re enjoying your newly wedded wife, and you left me all in my winding sheet

Whilst the lily on the rose or the covering in my clothes, my true love has sent me to sleep”

Knight William caught (got?) up and he called his merry men, he called them by one by twos and threes

He dressed them all up in a scarlet of red and himself in a suit of green

They rode; they rode to Lady Margaret’s house and tipping so gently at the ring

But none was as ready as Lady Margaret’s brother, for to go up and let Knight William in

“It’s often and often I’ve kissed those ruby lips, and it’s fondly thou has kissed mine

But I vow and declare, Lady Margaret”, he said “that I never shall kiss anyone but thine”

Lady Margaret was buried in Lady Mary’s Church; Knight William was buried in a bow (bower?)

And it’s over Lady Margaret there grew a red rose, and its over Knight William grew a briar

They grew they grew for seven long years, until they could not grow no high

They grew they grew to a true lovers knot, and the red rose covers the briar.


Mary lord abore and flynn

Prince Robert (Child 87) said, “how fast you were asleep

Mary Lord Abore and Flynn

Lord Abore and Mary Flynn were both children young,

They were scarcely 14 years of age when love between them sprung

When love between them sprung 

Now Lord Abore was going out one day and when his mother came to know,

''You are going away, my son'', she said, ''you will drink before you go

You will drink before you go''

She called for a cask of the very best wine and filled a glass for him,

To her fause, her fause, with her two fingers she put strong poison in

She put strong poison in

 ''Oh why, oh why, dear mother'' he said, ''have you poisoned me full sore

''It is so, my son'', she said to him, ''you'll see Mary Flynn no more

''You'll see Mary Flynn no more'' 


''Is there anyone in this household'', he said, ''who will go on an errand for me

Who will ride to Mary Flynn's high tower and fetch here to me

And fetch her here to me? ''

And then up spoke the young servant boy, ''I'm your faithful servant'', said he,

''I will ride to Mary Flynn's high tower and fetch her here to thee

And fetch her here to thee'' 

And when he came to Mary Flynn's tower, he stepped into the hall

The tables were laid and the music played and the ladies were dancing all

And the ladies were dancing all 

''What brought you here, my pretty little boy, what brought you here to me?

Has my grandmother set a place for you or yet invited thee,

Or yet invited thee? '' 

''Your grandmother set no place for me, nor invited me'', he said

And then she learned from the servant boy that Lord Abore was dead

That Lord Abore was dead 


''Come saddle for me my swiftest steed, come saddle for me the bay

That I may ride to my true love's side without the least delay,

Without the least delay'' 

And when she came to Lord Abore's tower, she stepped into the hall

The tables were laid and the sheets were spread and the torches burning all,

And the torches burning all   

''What brought you here, Mary Flynn'', she says, ''what brought you here to me? ''

''Oh the ring that['s] on his little finger, I came to crave of thee,

I came to crave of thee''

''No ring, no ring, Mary Flynn'', she says, ''no ring have I for thee,

For the pain of death it came so quick, it split the ring in three,

It split the ring in three'' 

She laid her cheek down by his cheek, her side down by his side,

She laid her cheek down by his cheek and then Mary Flynn she died,

And Mary Flynn she died.



Lord baker young beichan child 53
Lord Baker the bayYoung Beichan (Child 53)

There was a lord who lived in this place, he being a lord of a high renown

For he left his foot upon a ship board, and swore strange countries that he’d go find

For he travelled east and he travelled west, and half the south and the east also,

until he arrived into Turkey land

There he was taken and bound in a prison, until his life it was quite wearee

Oh Turkey bold had one only daughter, as fair a lady as your eyes could see,

For she stole the keys of her dado’s harbour, and swore Lord Baker that she’d set free

Saying “you have houses and you have livin’, and all Northhumber belongs to thee

What would you give to that fair young lady, it is out of trouble would set you free

Sayin’ I have houses and I have livin’, and all Northhumber belongs to me

I would will them all to that fair young lady, it’s out of trouble would set me free


For she brought him down to her dado’s harbour, and filled for him was the ship of fame

And at every toast that she did drink round him, I wish Lord Baker that you were mine

For they’ve made a vow and for seven year, and seven more for to keep it strong

Saying “if you don’t wed with no other fair maid, I’m sure I’ll wed with no other man

Oh seven year it was past and over, and seven more it was rolling on

When she bundled up all her gold and clothing, and swore Lord Baker that she’d go find

For she travelled east and she travelled west, until she came to the palace of fame

“Who is that, who’s that” replies the porter, “that knocks so gently and can’t get in

“Is this Lord Bakers palace” replies the lady, “or is his lordship himself within”

“This is Lord Baker’s palace” replies the porter, “but this very day took a new bride in

“Will you tell him send me a cut of his wedding cake, and a glass of his wine it being ere so strong

And to remember that fair young lady, who did release him in Turkey land”


In goes, in goes, was the young bold porter, and kneel down gently on his right knee

“Rise up, rise up, it’s my young bold porter, what news, what news have you got for me?”

Saying “I have news of a greatest person, as fair a lady as my eyes could a see

She is at the gate waiting for your charitee

“She wears a gold ring on every finger, and on the middle one where she wears three

And she has more gold hung around her middle, than’d buy Lord Humber and family”

“She told you send her a cut of your wedding cake, and a glass of your wine it being ere so strong

And to remember that fair young lady, who did release you in Turkey land”

For he caught the sword just by the middle, and he cut the wedding cake in pieces three

Down comes, down comes, was the young bride’s mother, “oh what will I do for my daughter dear”

“I own your daughter is none discover, and none the better is she to me

Your daughter came with one pack of gold, I’ll revert her home love with thirty three”


Tom lenihan1
Tom Lenihan gently on his right knee

Singing session in McCarthy’s pub, Clonlaheen - 1989.

From left: Patrick Lynch, `Junior` Crehan, Tom Lenihan, Séamus Ó Raghallaigh, Luke Cheevers, Barry Gleeson.

Photo: Tom Munnelly

Tom Lenihan, cutting the cake on his 80th birthday – 1985

Photo: Tom Munnelly


Bonny barbara allen
Bonny Barbara Allen gently on his right knee


Barb ry ellen bonny barbara allen child 84
Barb’ry Ellen gently on his right kneeBonny Barbara Allen (Child 84)

In Dublin Town I was brought up, and Limerick being my dwelling;

I fell in love with a pretty girl, they called her Barb’ry Ellen. 

They called her Barb’ry Ellen; I fell in love with a pretty girl,

They called her Barb’ry Ellen.

For twelve long months I courted her until I thought I’d get her,

But wait a while and you will hear how maiden’s minds do alter 

How maidens minds do alter, but wait a while and you will hear

How maiden’s minds do alter

I fell sick and very bad, I sent for her to cure me

The words she said when e’er she came,“I fear young man you’re dying” 

“I fear young man you’re dying”, the words she said when e’er she came

“I fear young man you’re dying”


“Dying dear? How can that be? one kiss from you will cure me”

“One kiss from me you’ll never get, if your very heart was breaking”  

If your very heart was breaking, one kiss from me you’ll never get

If your very heart was breaking”

“Do you remember Saturday night, when you were in the alehouse?

You drank ale with all fair maids, and slighted Barb’ry Ellen” 

“And slighted Barb’ry Ellen, you drank ale with all fair maids

And slighted Barb’ry Ellen”

“I do remember Saturday night, when we were in the alehouse

I drank ale to all fair maids, as a toast to Barb’ry Ellen” 

“As a toast to Barb’ry Ellen, I drank ale to all fair maids

As a toast to Barb’ry Ellen”

As she was in her father’s lawn, she saw a corpse a coming

“Lay down, lay down my true lover’s corpse, until I gaze upon him”

“Until I gaze upon him, lay down, lay down my true lover’s corpse

Until I gaze upon him” 


The more she gazed the more she sobbed, the more she scorned at him

Until all her friends cried out in shame, “False hearted Barb’ry Ellen” 

“False hearted Barb’ry Ellen”

Until all her friends cried out in shame, “False hearted Barb’ry Ellen”

“Go home dear mother, make my bed down, oh, make it soft and narrow,

A young man died for me last night, I’ll die for him tomorrow” 

I’ll die for him tomorrow”, a young man died for me last night,

I’ll die for him tomorrow”

Now these couple are dead and gone, and in one grave together.

One of them died in pure true love, and the other in grief and sorrow 

And the other in grief and sorrow, one of them died in pure true love

And the other in grief and sorrow


Lamkin
Lamkin at him


False lankum lamkin child 93

False Lankum at himLamkin (Child 93)

Oh the Lord and his Lady they went walkin’ one day, said the Lord to his Lady those words he did say

“Be aware of False Lankum, or ‘tis any of his men, be aware of False Nora and don’t let her in”

“I’m not afraid of False Lankum, or ‘tis any of his men

I’ve my door fairly bolted and my windows hard in”

Oh the Lord was not long gone when False Lankum came in

And he knocked at the door and the nurse let him in

“Sayin’ a where is the Lord gone, or ‘tis is he at in

He’s gone to fair England, for to speak to the King

False Nora gave son Jacky ‘twas a stab in the side

False Nora gave son Jacky ‘twas a stab of a knife


“False Nora, False Nora, are you asleep or awake? at him

Don’t you hear my fine baby and it cryin’ so weak”

“I cannot please your baby with a breast milk or wine

I would beg you my lady would you daddle it awhile?”

“It is how could I get down there, this dark dreary night

Without a fire before me, or a candle to light”

“You have three of those bright mantles; they’re as bright as the moon

You put one o’ them all around you; you will get down here soon”

She put one o’ them all around her, she came tripping down stairs

Into False Lankums’ arms, this lady appeared

“False Lankum, False Lankum, will you spare me one hour

I’ll give you as much money as lies in my power”


“If you give me as much money that my horses could not draw

That will not keep my bright sword, from your white naked jaw”

“False Lankum, False Lankum, will you spare me one hour

I’ll give you my Daughter Bessie; she’s the flock of the flower”

“You call down your Daughter Bessie, and send her to work

For to scour a silver basin, for to hold your heart’s blood”

 “Daughter Bessie, Daughter Bessie, keep yoursel’ locked up high

Cause your Daddo he will come here, when he’s late now bye an bye”

O False Lankum was not long gone, was a ride from this place

When the Lord he came here, and the place in rascrace (disgrace?)

There was blood in the kitchen; there was blood in the hall

There was blood in the cradle, it was worse than it all


There was blood in the kitchen; there was blood in the hall draw

And the young Queen of England, lyin’ dead by the wall

“Daughter Bessie, Daughter Bessie, it is who was within?

False Lankum he was here, twenty of his brave men”

False Lankum was hung in, ‘was a scaffold so high

And the nurse she was burned in the Hills of Fermoy



Weelya weelya waulya the cruel mother child 20
Weelya Weelya Waulya drawThe Cruel Mother (Child 20)

There was an oul woman and she lived in the woods, Weelya, weelya, waulya.

There was an oul woman and she lived in the woods, Down by the river saulya

She had a baby three months old, Weelya, weelya, waulya.

She had a baby three months old, Down by the river saulya

She had a penknife long and sharp, Weelya, weelya, waulya

She had a penknife long and sharp, Down by the river saulya

She stuck the penknife in the babies heart, Weelya, weelya, waulya

She stuck the penknife in the babies heart, Down by the river saulya

Three big men came knocking on the door, Weelya, weelya, waulya

Three big men came knocking on the door, Down by the river saulya.

Two policeman and a man, Weelya, weelya, waulya

Two policeman and a man, Down by the river saulya.


Are you the woman that kilt your child, Weelya, weelya, waulya

Are you the woman that kilt your child, Down by the river saulya.

Yes I’m the woman that kilt my child, Weelya, weelya, waulya

Yes I’m the woman that kilt my child, Down by the river saulya.

The rope got pulled and she was hung, Weelya, weelya, waulya

The rope got pulled and she was hung, Down by the river saulya.

And that was the end of the woman in the woods, Weelya, weelya, waulya

And that was the end of the woman in the woods, Down by the river saulya.

The moral to the story is, Weelya, weelya, waulya

Don’t stick penknives in babies heads, Down by the river saulya


Elizabeth bess cronin
Elizabeth (Bess) Cronin waulya

Bess at the door of the Plantation

1951

(Photo: Robin Roberts)

Bess recording for the BBC – 1952 (Seamus Ennis in the background)


Lord gregory the lass of roch royal child76
Lord Gregory waulyaThe Lass of Roch Royal (Child76)

I am a King’s daughter that strayed from Cappoquin; in search of Lord Gregory may God I find him

The rain beats at my yellow locks, and the dew wets me still, the babe is cold in my arms Lord Gregory let me in

“Lord Gregory is not here and henceforth can’t be seen, he’s gone to Bonny Scotland to bring home his new Queen”

“Who’ll shoe my babe’s little feet, who’ll put gloves on her hand, and who’ll tie my babe’s middle with a long and green band”

Who’ll comb my babe’s yellow locks, with an ivory comb, and who’ll be my babe’s father till Lord Gregory comes home”

“I’ll shoe your babe’s little feet, I’ll put gloves on her hands, and I’ll tie your babe’s middle with a long and green band

I’ll comb your babe’s yellow locks with an ivory comb, and I’ll be your babe’s father till Lord Gregory comes home”


Leave now those windows and likewise this hall, for its deep in the sea you should hide your downfall

Do you remember Lord Gregory that night in Cappoquin, when we both changed pocket handkerchiefs and that against my will?

Yours was pure linen love and mine was coarse cloth, yours cost one guinea love and mine but one groat.

Leave now those windows and likewise this hall, for its deep in the sea you should hide your downfall

Do you remember Lord Gregory that night in Cappoquin, we both changed rings of our fingers and that against my will?

Yours was pure silver, love, and mine was block tin, yours cost one guinea love and mine but one cent

Leave now those windows and likewise this hall, for its deep in the sea you should hide your downfall


Do you remember Lord Gregory that night in my father’s hall, when you stole away my fond heart and that was worse than all?

Leave now those windows and likewise this hall, for its deep in the sea you should hide your downfall

The rain beats at my yellow locks, and the dew wets me still, the babe is cold in my arms Lord Gregory let me in

My curse on you mother and my curse it being sore, sure I dreamt the lass of arms came knocking to my door

Lie down you foolish son and lie down and sleep, for it is long ago her weary locks are waving in the deep

Come saddle me the black horse, the brown or the bay, come saddle me the best horse in my stable this day

And I’ll range over valleys, and over mountains so wide, till I’ll find the lass of arms and I’ll lie by her side.


Nora cleary
Nora Cleary hall, when you stole away my fond heart and that was worse than all?


The holland handkerchief the suffolk miracle child 272
The Holland Handkerchief hall, when you stole away my fond heart and that was worse than all?The Suffolk Miracle (Child 272)

There was a Lord who lived in this town, and a Lord of a high renown

He had a daughter and a beauty bright, and the name he called her was his heart’s delight.

Now, many young men a courting came, but none of them could her favour gain

Till there came a man of a low degree, and above all others she fancied he.

Now, when her father came this to know, he very angry to her did go

Fifty miles he sent her away, for to deprive them of their wedding day.

One night as Mary was for her bed bound, as she was taking off her gown

She heard a voice of a deadly sound, saying “loose the bonds love by which we’re bound”

Her father’s steed she well did know, her mother’s mantle she knew also

She dressed herself in a rich attire, and away she went with her heart’s desire.


‘Twas with her true love she rode behind, they rode far swifter that any wind

For about an hour or a little more, then he cried “my darling my head is sore”

A Holland Handkerchief, she then pulled out, and round his head she bound it about

She kissed his lips and these words did say “my love you’re colder than any clay”

And when they came to her father’s gate “alight” this young man said “the hour is late

Alight my jewel and go to bed and your father’s horse I’ll see brushed and fed”

And when she came to her father’s hall, “who’s there who’s there” her father called

“'Tis I dear father, did you not send for me, by such a messenger” and naming he.

Her father swore this young man was dead; he tore the grey hair down off his head

He wrung his hands and he cried full sore, but the more he cried, she cried ten times more


Twas early, early at the break of day, to her true loves grave they made their way,

Although this young man is nine months dead, a Holland Handkerchief is round his head

And its woe to parents I do say still, who part young couples against their will

For when their hearts and their hands they give, we ne’er shall part them while they shall live.


Lord randal
Lord Randal grave they made their way,


Amhr n na heascainne lord randal child 12
Amhrán na hEascainne grave they made their way,Lord Randal (Child 12)

"Cé raibh tú ó mhaidin a dheartháirín ó?Cé raibh tú ó mhaidin a phlúir na bhfear óg?""Bhí mé ag iascach 's ag foghlaereacht, cóirigh mo leaba dhom,Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus caithfidh mé luí.""Céard a d'ith tú ag do bhricfeasta a dheartháirín ó?Céard a d'ith tú ag do bhricfeasta a phlúir na bhfear óg?""Fuair mé eascann a raibh lúb uirthi, nimh fuinte brúite uirthi,Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus caithfidh mé luí.""Céard a fhágfas tú ag do dheartháir a dheartháirín ó?Céard a fhágfas tú ag do dheartháir a phlúir na bhfear óg?""Muise, cúig mhíle punt aige, gunna agus cú aige,Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus caithfidh mé luí.""Céard a fhágfas tú ag do dheirfiúr a dheartháirín ó?Céard a fhágfas tú ag do dheirfiúr a phlúir na bhfear óg?""Caoirigh beaga bána aici, na beithigh le bleán aici,Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus caithfidh mé luí."


"Céard a fhágfas tú ag t'athair a dheartháirín ó? grave they made their way,Céard a fhágfas tú ag t'athair a phlúir na bhfear óg?""Muise eochair mo stábla aige, cuig mile púnt aige,Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus caithfidh mé luí.""Céard a fhágfas tú ag do mháithrín a dheartháirín ó?Céard a fhágfas tú ag do mháithir a phlúir na bhfear óg?""Má fhágaim an saol go brách aici, fágfad croí cráite aici,Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus caithfidh mé luí.""Céard a fhágfas tú ag do chuid páistí a dheartháirín ó?Céard a fhágfas tú ag do chuid páistí a phlúir na bhfear óg?""Muise fuacht fada 'gus seachrán, agus oíche ar gach bothán,Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus caithfidh mé luí.""Céard a fhágfas tú ag do bhean phósta a dheartháirín ó?Céard a fhágfas tú ag do bhean phósta a phlúir na bhfear óg?"Muise Flaithis a bheith dúinte uirthi, "Ifreann mar dhúiche aici,Tá mé tinn fá mo chroí agus bead go deo deo."


The song of the eel lord randal child 12
The Song of the Eel grave they made their way,Lord Randal (Child 12)

"Where have you been since morning, my pet?Where have you been since morning, oh flower of young men?""Fishing and fowling. Make my bed for me.I'm sick in/to my heart and I'll have to lie down.""What did you eat at your breakfast, my pet?What did you eat at your breakfast, oh flower of young men?""An eel with a twist in her, poison kneaded and mixed into her.I'm sick in/to my heart and I'll have to lie down.""What will you leave your brother, my pet?What will you leave your brother, oh flower of young men?""Five thousand pounds, a gun and a hound.I'm sick in/to my heart and I'll have to lie down.""What will you leave your sister, my pet?What will you leave your sister, oh flower of young men?""Little white sheep and the cattle to milk.I'm sick in/to my heart and I'll have to lie down."


"What will you leave your father, my pet? grave they made their way,What will you leave your father, oh flower of young men?""The key to my stable, that and my mare.I'm sick in/to my heart and I'll have to lie down.""What will you leave your mother, my pet?What will you leave your mother, oh flower of young men?""If I leave life forever to her I'll leave her a broken heart.I'm sick in/to my heart and I'll have to lie down.""What will you leave your children, my pet?What will you leave your children, oh flower of young men?""A long time wandering in the cold, and each night a different shelter.I'm sick in/to my heart and I'll have to lie down.""What will you leave your wedded wife, my pet?What will you leave your wedded wife, oh flower of young men?"“Heaven to be closed on her, and Hell as her surroundings

And I'm sick in/to my heart and will be for ever and ever."


Henry me son lord randal child 12
Henry Me Son grave they made their way,Lord Randal (Child 12)

Where have ye been all day, Henry me son, Where have ye been all day, my beloved one.

Away in a meadow, Away in a meadow, Make my bed I’ve a pain in me head.

And I want to lie down.

What did ye have to eat, Henry me son, what did ye have to eat, my beloved one.

Poisoned beans, poisoned beans, Make my bed I’ve a pain in me head.

And I want to lie down.

What colour were them beans, Henry me son, what colour were them beans, my beloved one.

Green and yella, green and yella, Make my bed I’ve a pain in me head.

And I want to lie down.

What will ye leave your mother, Henry me son, what will ye leave your mother, my beloved one.

A woollen blanket, a woollen blanket, Make my bed I’ve a pain in me head.

And I want to lie down.


And what will ye leave your father, Henry me son, what will ye leave your father, my beloved one.

A watch and chain, a watch and chain, Make my bed I’ve a pain in me head.

And I want to lie down.

And what will ye leave your brother, Henry me son, what will ye leave your brother, my beloved one.

A blue suit, a blue suit, Make my bed I’ve a pain in me head.

And I want to lie down.

And what will ye leave your childer, Henry me son, what will ye leave your childer, my beloved one.

The keys of heaven, the keys of heaven, Make my bed I’ve a pain in me head.

And I want to lie down.

And what will ye leave your sweetheart, Henry me son, what will ye leave your sweetheart, my beloved one.

A rope to hang her, a rope to hang her, Make my bed I’ve a pain in me head.

And I want to lie down.


“There Was a Lord ye leave your father, my beloved one.

Who Lived in This Town”

Jerry O’Reilly

National Library of Ireland

December 2013


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