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NUTRITION & FITNESS WORKSHOPS SPRING 2004 BEGINNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM “Develop your own personalized exercise program” Reggie Hinton, Facility Manager PowerPoint PPT Presentation


NUTRITION & FITNESS WORKSHOPS SPRING 2004 BEGINNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM “Develop your own personalized exercise program” Reggie Hinton, Facility Manager.

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NUTRITION & FITNESS WORKSHOPS SPRING 2004 BEGINNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM “Develop your own personalized exercise program” Reggie Hinton, Facility Manager

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NUTRITION & FITNESS WORKSHOPSSPRING 2004BEGINNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM“Develop your own personalized exercise program”Reggie Hinton, Facility Manager


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“When you want something you never had, you have to do something you have never done.”- Jeff Connors, UNC Assistant AD, Strength & Conditioning

  • Presentation Objectives:

  • To discuss the foundations to beginning an exercise program

  • To define the components of physical fitness

  • To provide case studies that show participants how to achieve their goals


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  • FOUNDATIONS TO BEGIN AN EXERCISE PROGRAM

  • The Importance of Mental Focus

  • The human mind is powerful! You CAN accomplish what you believe you can.

  • A FOCUSED human mind is even more powerful! Setting goals helps you gain the mental focus necessary to achieve physical fitness.

    • Goal setting converts intangible concepts like physical fitness into tangible objects like reduced body fat percentage, larger muscles, and increased aerobic endurance.

    • Goals should be realistic

    • Goals should be measurable and lead to objectives

      • GOAL = To increase my 1 RM on bench press from 225 lbs to 245 lbs in one semester

      • OBJ 1 = I will change my workout from a focus on hypertrophy (6-12 RM) to a focus on strength and power (<6 RM)


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  • FOUNDATIONS TO BEGIN AN EXERCISE PROGRAM

  • Motivation for Exercise: Move from External to Internal Motives

  • EXTERNAL MOTIVATION & THE DANGERS

    • Most people begin exercising for reasons external to them (i.e., to lose weight, to fit into my bathing suit for Spring Break, to impress girls, etc.)

    • This is a dangerous situation because once the goals have been achieved, people lose interest in exercising

    • Also dangerous because people employ a “BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY” attitude

      • Exercise addiction

      • Eating disorders

      • Reliance on performance enhancing supplements


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  • FOUNDATIONS TO BEGIN AN EXERCISE PROGRAM

  • Motivation for Exercise: Move from External to Internal Motives

  • INTERNAL MOTIVATION & THE BENEFITS

    • Research has shown that people who are internally motivated for an activity or task are more likely to adhere to it

    • INTERNAL MOTIVATION = Enjoyment & Competence

    • Exercise motives can begin as external factors but should progress to internal factors

    • Internal motivation results in a “LIFESPAN ACHIEVEMENT” attitude that helps you plan strategically for success

      • Not looking for a “quick fix,” but a lifelong approach to physical fitness

      • Reveals false information (i.e., fitness magazines, fitness supplements, etc.)

      • Helps you understand your body and how it works


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  • BEGINNING YOUR EXERCISE PROGRAM

  • “You see where you want to be, but don’t know how to get there”

  • STEP 1: Identify the areas of physical fitness you WANT to improve

    • Muscular Strength = the maximal amount of force a muscle or muscle group can generate in a specified movement pattern at a specified velocity of movement

    • Muscular Endurance = the ability of a muscle or muscle group to exert sub-maximal force for several repetitions, or to hold a contraction for a sustained length of time

    • Cardiovascular Fitness = the ability to perform repetitive, moderate to high intensity, large muscle movement for a prolonged period of time

    • Flexibility = the range of motion possible around a joint

    • Body Composition = the estimated percentage of the body composed of fat mass and lean body mass


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  • BEGINNING YOUR EXERCISE PROGRAM

  • “You see where you want to be, but don’t know how to get there”

  • STEP 2: Set goals based on your “areas of improvement” within the components of physical fitness

    • Set goals that are JUST OUTSIDE OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE

      • If you set goals that are too easy, you will not put forth effort to achieve them

      • If you set goals that are too hard, you have effort initially, but it subsides as you realize you can’t achieve your goals

  • STEP 3: Use your mind to overcome doubt, stereotypes, false information, fear, and procrastination and achieve your goals

  • STEP 4: Develop a plan and commit to it


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  • CASE STUDY: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

  • Lauren was primarily interested in a personal fitness program. She was actively involved in an aerobic running program and was ready to include a resistance training program to balance her conditioning activities, improve her upper-body strength, and prevent lower-limb injury during aerobic exercise.

    • STEP 1: Identify the areas of physical fitness you WANT to improve

      • Additional upper body strength

      • Quadriceps, hamstring, and calf exercises to aid in her injury-prevention program

    • STEP 2: Set goals based on your “areas for improvement”

      • To improve my upper body strength by incorporating strength training exercises into my normal regimen

      • To prevent lower-limb injury during aerobic exercise by performing strength activities for my quadriceps, hamstrings, and calf muscles


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  • CASE STUDY: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

  • STEP 3: Use your mind to OVERCOME

    • Personalized self-talk that is encouraging and motivational (i.e., “I can achieve my goals if I consistently perform these exercises.”)

    • Each workout should follow a period of mental preparation – get ready to exercise and focus so that sessions are productive

    • Eliminate negative thoughts that may prevent you from being successful (i.e., women shouldn’t weight train, I can’t achieve my goals, people will look at me funny if I lift weights, etc.)


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  • CASE STUDY: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

  • STEP 4: Develop a plan and commit to it

    EXERCISEMUSCLESETSREPS

    Bench PressChest312, 10, 10

    Lat Pull-downBack310, 10, 10

    CrunchesAbdominal215, 15

    Leg RaisesAbdominal/Hip Flexor215, 15

    Back ExtensionErector Spinae215, 15

    Leg ExtensionsQuadriceps315, 15, 15

    Leg CurlHamstrings315, 15, 15

    Calf RaiseGastrocnemius215, 15

    Soleus


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  • CASE STUDY: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

    Additional Program Components: Ways to Enhance the Existing Program

  • Cardiovascular Fitness: ACSM Standards

    • Frequency:3-5 days/week

    • Duration:20-60 minutes of continuous activity

    • Intensity:65-90% of Maximum Heart Rate (MHR)

      Calculate intensity with this formula:

      MHR X 0.65 (lower threshold) to MHR X 0.90 (upper threshold)

      *MHR = 220 – Age (beats/min)

  • Flexibility Training

    • Immediately following light-intensity warm-up activity similar to the primary conditioning activity (10-20 sec/muscle)

    • After primary conditioning activity (10-20 sec/muscle, 2-3 times)


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  • CASE STUDY: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

    Additional Program Components: Ways to Enhance the Existing Program

  • Body Composition

    • Product of exercise and diet

    • Consult with a professional in nutrition to determine the types of food to consume and when


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REFERENCES

Fleck, S. J. & Kraemer, W. J. (1997). Individualizing exercise prescriptions. In S. J. Fleck & W. J. Kraemer Designing resistance training programs (2nd ed.). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

O’Brien, T.S. (1997). Creating your client’s program. In T.S. O’Brien The personal trainer’s handbook. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

Yoke, M. (2001). Fitness assessment. In L.A. Gladwin (Ed.) A guide to personal fitness training. Sherman Oaks, CA: Aerobics and Fitness Association of America.


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