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Fighting Petty Corruption in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: Results and Implications for Forest and Biodiversity Conservation of the USAID/DRC funded “ Relance Economique” project . A presentation to the ABCG/WWF by Michael Brown President, Innovative Resources Management

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Fighting Petty Corruption in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: Results and Implications for Forest and Biodiversity Conservation of the USAID/DRC funded “Relance Economique” project

A presentation to the ABCG/WWF by

Michael Brown

President, Innovative Resources Management

January 13, 2005


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The Project Congo:

STRENGTHENING THE CAPACITY OF CIVIL SOCIETY AND BUSINESS TO PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH ALONG THE CONGO AND ITS TRIBUTARIES IN THE DRC - THE "RELANCE ECONOMIQUE"

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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How can a project promoting economic growth along the Congo River and its tributaries be good for biodiversity conservation?

Answer:

Forest and biodiversity conservation will be promoted if those with the greatest incentive to threaten resources become more fully integrated into structures and mechanisms that create greater accountability and improved governance.

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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River and its tributaries be good for biodiversity conservation?Relance Economique” facts

  • Phase 1:

    • USAID funding - $ 1,000,000;

    • Duration: 18 months (Jan 2003 to Jun 2004);

    • Where: Equateur and Bandundu provinces.

  • Phase 2:

    • USAID funding – $1,353,987;

    • Duration:12 months (Oct 2004 to Sept 2005);

    • Where: Equateur, Bandundu and Orientale Provinces.

  • Average household income in project zone: $46/annually/8 people.

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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River and its tributaries be good for biodiversity conservation?Relance Economique” Facts (cont.)

  • Currently seeking funding ($750,000 – Building Capacity to Manage Crucial Conflicts in the DRC) to complement the project’s anti-corruption focus.

  • Issues to address:

    • Safeguarding the transition period;

    • Preparing for Demilitarization, Demobilization, Reinsertion (DDR);

    • Supporting civil society involvement in the electoral process;

    • Enabling any policy shifts in decentralization;

    • Addressing resource based conflicts.

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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Phase I - Key Activities River and its tributaries be good for biodiversity conservation?

  • Analysis of cost of corruption to diverse stakeholders.

  • Provincial networking (2 workshops, Convoi “Sans/100 Problèmes”).

  • National and provincial information dissemination.

  • Creation of Comité de Lutte Anti-Tracasseries (CLATs).

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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Our thesis from the beginning has been….. River and its tributaries be good for biodiversity conservation?

Contrary to conventional wisdom, it is possible to contribute to significant reductions in corruption in a country as “complex” as the DRC. Furthermore, it is possible to do so through United States government sponsored activities.

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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What is unique about the IRM approach to anti-corruption? River and its tributaries be good for biodiversity conservation?

  • We mobilize social capital across Congolese society.

  • We begin with bread and butter (versus abstract) issues (e.g. development, food security).

  • We generate measurable impacts (#s of barriers).

  • We produce multiplier effects (CLATS, media).

  • We successfully facilitate political and administrative participation with: “Espace Presidentielle”, Ministries, Governors, Services.

  • Coalitions formed can springboard elsewhere (elections, DDR).

  • Mechanisms can be up-scaled (local to national).

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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Multiple awareness campaigns run by civil society organizations addressing local corruption and its consequences to stakeholders and the economy.

MOUs and agreements signed between government authorities and river associations for the control and reduction of taxes.

Campaign of the Union Congolaise des Armateurs des Baleinières (UCAB) denouncing corruption in ports.

Campaign of the Association des Armateurs du Congo (ASSARCO) in 24 ports in Kinshasa and Maluku.

Tangible Results

  • MOU between ASSARCO and Hotel de Ville de Kinshasa. Reduction in the cost of transport seals from $14 /ton to $0.50/ton, only 4 services in each port.

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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Results (cont.) organizations addressing local corruption and its consequences to stakeholders and the economy.

  • Civil society mobilized into committees (CLATs) to fight petty corruption on principal waterways.

  • IRM research and studies show a reduction in illicit rent seeking of 95% in the Mai-Ndombe.

  • IRM data base on corruption issues available for consultation.

  • Presidential decree issued to fight corruption.

  • The “Espace Presidentielle” has been engaged – VPs Bemba and Yerodia.

  • The DRC governmental Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (CELC) has agreed to support CLATs by promoting their legalization.

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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Impacts organizations addressing local corruption and its consequences to stakeholders and the economy.

  • Civil society is more aware now of corruption, its consequences, and ways to fight and reduce it.

  • Spontaneous participation of civil society under committees (CLATs) to identify and fight corruption.

  • Collaboration between GDRC and IRM to establish steps to fight corruption expanding.

  • Increased demand for project voiced throughout the provinces.

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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Impacts (cont.) organizations addressing local corruption and its consequences to stakeholders and the economy.

  • IRM actions and activities continually reported in the print media, television and radio.

  • Personal involvement of Vice-Presidents in taking measures to apply existing laws and regulations.

  • CELC see CLATs as vehicles to enable civil society to pursue anti-corruption “watch-dogging” at local levels.

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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What works and what does not work organizations addressing local corruption and its consequences to stakeholders and the economy.

  • What works

    • Transparency;

    • Objectivity in data and analysis;

    • Multi stakeholder collaboration;

    • Progressive capacity building of CLATs.

  • What does not work

    • Top-down planning;

    • “End arounds”;

    • Too much emotion and subjectivity.

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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Where we go from here organizations addressing local corruption and its consequences to stakeholders and the economy.

  • Strengthen the advocacy and operational capacity of CLATs.

  • Extend activities into other provinces and river axes as feasible.

  • Expansion of a multi stakeholder communication network through high frequency radio and structured meetings.

  • Integrate conflict management activities.

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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Where we go from here (cont.) organizations addressing local corruption and its consequences to stakeholders and the economy.

  • Address “tracasseries” constraining road networks.

    • Creation of committees for road users (based on the idea of CLATs for waterways).

  • 2nd Convoy “Sans/100 Problèmes” between Kinshasa and Kisangani.

  • Support the transition and electoral process as feasible.

  • Collaboration between IRM and Deputies of the National Assembly on the proposed Decentralization Legislation.

  • Explore opportunities for CLAT activities in forest zoning.

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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The Secret to Success organizations addressing local corruption and its consequences to stakeholders and the economy.

  • Be fully transparent;

  • Add value through continuing to help people understand the costs of corruption that they bear;

  • Be creative in helping people work out possible solutions to apparently insurmountable dilemmas;

  • Be systematic and resolute in following through in compliance concerning commitments.

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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Implications for Biodiversity Conservation organizations addressing local corruption and its consequences to stakeholders and the economy.

  • Low level corruption should not necessarily be assumed to be less of a threat to biodiversity conservation than high level corruption associated with ‘conflict timber” or “blood diamonds”.

  • Without reduced corruption in daily life of the poor, it is hard to imagine how the masses will have the incentive to support sustainable forest and biodiversity conservation objectives.

  • An approach that creates broad-based stakeholder coalitions involving civil society, government, and the media is the only credible approach to addressing corruption related issues impacting on forest and biodiversity conservation.

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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Implications for Biodiversity Conservation organizations addressing local corruption and its consequences to stakeholders and the economy.(contd.)

  • Forest and biodiversity conservation activities should link to CLATs where feasible.

  • IRM in our work in Relance Economique, CBFP and Congo Livelihood Improvement and Food Security (CLIFS) Project will progressively enhance the capacity of CLATS to deal with issues that impact on forest and biodiversity conservation.

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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Our Objective in Fighting Corruption is Much More of this,.….

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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and this, versus…… this,.….

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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….This, this,.….

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


Or this l.jpg
Or this. this,.….

Fighting Petty Corruption in the DRC


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