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The Aboriginals PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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The Aboriginals. Presented By: Vineet, Paul, Cassandra, Christina, Sachin. Place of Origin. Many people think that since aboriginals have been around for so long that it is believed that they evolved from the ground.

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The Aboriginals

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The aboriginals l.jpg

The Aboriginals

Presented By: Vineet, Paul, Cassandra, Christina, Sachin


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Place of Origin

  • Many people think that since aboriginals have been around for so long that it is believed that they evolved from the ground.

  • A second theory is that the Aboriginals migrated from the east (Asia) to the west (North, and South America).

  • They came by crossing a land bridge over Bearing Strait.


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  • They came approximately 35,000 years ago.

  • Archaeologists have found native artifacts dating back beyond 10,000 years.

  • Some things they have found are beaded belts, animal paintings on rock outcrops, bones representing burial rites and wooden carvings.

This is an example of an Aboriginal beaded belt.


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Other interesting facts…

  • Aboriginals have many interesting stories about genesis/origins.

  • These stories hold a great deal of spiritual powers.

  • The definition of Aboriginal is: of native ancestry inhabiting or existing in a land from the earliest times and before colonists.


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  • Not only are they located in North and South America, but they are also located around the world.

  • All over Canada, there are specific pieces for natives only. One is located is Orillia.

  • Aboriginals have many traditions and rituals, some are: the morning dance, and the sun dance.

  • The leader of the group is called a Sachem.


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Beliefs

  • Animism: all human and non-human withhold a soul and after death, live on.

  • Aboriginal is more polytheistic (believing in more than one god) rather than monotheistic (believing in one god).

  • They believe in reincarnation, or rebirth.


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Practices, Rituals, Ceremonies…

  • The Morning Dance: Occurs every spring, the Ojibwa of southern Ontario perform this dance. It pays homage to “the tree of the universe”

  • The Sun Dance: A summer festival that takes place over a period of eight to sixteen days. This festival was so powerful that the government banned it in the late 1880s.

  • The Potlatch Ceremony: Feasting, distributing wealth, and sharing songs and dances are all part of a Potlach. This was another ceremony that the government made illegal in 1884.


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Continued…

  • The Sweat Lodge: It is a ceremony common among the Great Plains nations and cleanses both the physical and spiritual body.

  • The Shaking Tent: It’s a ritual where one communicates with its spirits.


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Symbols…

• The Tree: Connects Earth to Heaven and is essential to some practices like the sun dance

• White Pine: Key symbol for Iroquois

• Cedar Tree: For west coast groups, it is an important carrier of symbols since it is used in the creation of totem poles


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Native Adherents

  • Census count of persons registered under the Indian Act (about 558,000)

  • That produced by the Indian Register maintained by the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (about 681,000)


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Aboriginal Influences

Interaction with European-Canadians

  • As far back as the late 18th century, First Nations believe they have been targeted for assimilation into what they call European/Canadian culture.

    Late 20th century

  • The Oka Crisis was a land dispute between the Mohawk nation and the town of Oka, Quebec which began on March 11, 1990, and lasted until September 26, 1990. It resulted in three deaths, and would be the first of a number of well-publicised violent conflicts between Indigenous people and the Canadian Govewrnment in the late 20th century.

  • The Ipperwash Crisis was an Indigenous land dispute that occurred in Ipperwash Provincial Park, Ontario in 1995. Several members of the Stoney Point Ojibway band occupied the park in order to assert their claim to the land. This led to a violent confrontation between protestors and the Ontario Provincial Police, who killed protestor Dudley George. The ensuing controversy was a major event in Canadian politics, and a provincial inquiry investigating the events continues today.


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Aboriginal Influences Cont.

Early 21st century

  • Many First Nations, along with their peers the Métis and the Inuit, claim to receive inadequate funding for education, and allege that their rights have been overlooked in many instances. Recently James K. Bartleman, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, listed the encouragement of indigenous young people as one of his key priorities, and during his term (which began in 2002) has launched several initiatives to promote literacy and bridge building.


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Just some pictures…

A portrait of The Sun Dance

After the Potlatch Ceremony

Chief Blackbird


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