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  1. Choosing Your Relatives Lesson 16 Joseph C. Blumenthal

  2. Here again are the relative pronouns that are used as clause signals to start adjective clauses. RELATIVE PRONNOUNS: who, whose, whom, which, that Are these the same clause signals that start adverb clauses? (yes, no)

  3. Here again are the relative pronouns that are used as clause signals to start adjective clauses. RELATIVE PRONNOUNS: who, whose, whom, which, that Are these the same clause signals that start adverb clauses? (yes, no)

  4. Use who, whose, and whom to refer only to people. Choose the correct relative pronoun: The clerk (who, which) took my order made a mistake in the bill.

  5. Use who, whose, and whom to refer only to people. Choose the correct relative pronoun: The clerk (who, which) took my order made a mistake in the bill.

  6. Use which to refer only to things and animals. Choose the correct relative pronoun: The store (who, which) sells these games is making a fortune.

  7. Use which to refer only to things and animals. Choose the correct relative pronoun: The store (who, which) sells these games is making a fortune.

  8. Use which to refer only to things and animals. It was the Rosses’ dog (which, who) tore up our flower bed.

  9. Use which to refer only to things and animals. It was the Rosses’ dog (which, who) tore up our flower bed.

  10. Use that to refer to anything—people, things, or animals. Choose the correct relative pronoun: Marian wrote a theme about the teacher (which, that) had helped her most.

  11. Use that to refer to anything—people, things, or animals. Choose the correct relative pronoun: Marian wrote a theme about the teacher (which, that) had helped her most.

  12. The main point to remember is never to use which to refer to people. Choose the correct relative pronoun: Citizens (who, which)

  13. The main point to remember is never to use which to refer to people. Choose the correct relative pronoun: Citizens (who, which)

  14. Choose the correct relative pronoun: The horse (who, which)

  15. Choose the correct relative pronoun: The horse (who, which)

  16. Choose the correct relative pronoun: Any doctor (which, that)

  17. Choose the correct relative pronoun: Any doctor (which, that)

  18. Choose the correct relative pronoun: The school (which, who)

  19. Choose the correct relative pronoun: The school (which, who)

  20. Choose the correct relative pronoun: A bumblebee (which, who)

  21. Choose the correct relative pronoun: A bumblebee (which, who)

  22. Choose the correct relative pronoun: The nurse (who, which)

  23. Choose the correct relative pronoun: The nurse (who, which)

  24. How do we choose between who and whom? Which form depends on its use within the clause itself. Use who when the pronoun is the subject of the verb. Use whom when it is the object of a verb or preposition. Any player whocan beat Evert must be very good. The pronoun who is the subject of the verb ________.

  25. How do we choose between who and whom? Which form depends on its use within the clause itself. Use who when the pronoun is the subject of the verb. Use whom when it is the object of a verb or preposition. Any player whocan beat Evert must be very good. The pronoun who is the subject of the verb can beat.

  26. The relative pronoun that starts an adjective clause is not always the subject. Any player whom Rosscan beat must be very good. The subject of the verb can beat is not the pronoun whom, but the noun ____.

  27. The relative pronoun that starts an adjective clause is not always the subject. Any player whom Rosscan beat must be very good. The subject of the verb can beat is not the pronoun whom, but the noun Ross.

  28. Any player whom Rosscan beat must be very good. The relative pronoun whom stands for the noun ______.

  29. Any player whom Rosscan beat must be very good. The relative pronoun whom stands for the noun player.

  30. Keeping in mind that the pronoun whom stands for the noun player, let us straighten out the clause. Whom Ross can beat = Ross can beat whom In this clause, the subject of the verb can beat is Ross, and its direct object is the relative pronoun ____.

  31. Keeping in mind that the pronoun whom stands for the noun player, let us straighten out the clause. Whom Ross can beat = Ross can beat whom In this clause, the subject of the verb can beat is Ross, and its direct object is the relative pronoun whom.

  32. Here is a quick way to decide whether the clause signal is a subject or an object: When you see no other word before the verb that could possibly serve as its subject, then the relative pronoun is its subject, and who is correct. who escaped who were absent who brought our car The only word that could be the subject here is _____.

  33. Here is a quick way to decide whether the clause signal is a subject or an object: When you see no other word before the verb that could possibly serve as its subject, then the relative pronoun is its subject, and who is correct. who escaped who were absent who brought our car The only word that could be the subject here is who.

  34. If, on the other hand, the verb already has a subject, then the relative pronoun must be its object, and whom is correct. whom I admire whom we invited whom the dog bit The verbs in the above clauses already have subjects; therefore whom must be the (subject, object) in each clause.

  35. If, on the other hand, the verb already has a subject, then the relative pronoun must be its object, and whom is correct. whom I admire whom we invited whom the dog bit The verbs in the above clauses already have subjects; therefore whom must be the (subject, object) in each clause.

  36. whom I admire whom we invited whom the dog bit When the relative pronoun that stands for a person is the direct object of the verb within the clause, we use the object form (who, whom)

  37. whom I admire whom we invited whom the dog bit When the relative pronoun that stands for a person is the direct object of the verb within the clause, we use the object form (who, whom)

  38. Mr. Dolby is a person…worries about nothing. Since the clause has no other subject, the relative pronoun would have to be the subject. We would therefore choose the subject form (who, whom).

  39. Mr. Dolby is a person…worries about nothing. Since the clause has no other subject, the relative pronoun would have to be the subject. We would therefore choose the subject form (who, whom).

  40. Mr. Dolby is a person…nothing worries. Since the clause already has the subject nothing, the relative pronoun would have to be the object. We would therefore choose the object form (who, whom).

  41. Mr. Dolby is a person…nothing worries. Since the clause already has the subject nothing, the relative pronoun would have to be the object. We would therefore choose the object form (who, whom).

  42. Choose the correct relative pronoun after deciding whether it is used as the subject or the object of the verb: People (who, whom) are honest themselves usually trust others.

  43. Choose the correct relative pronoun after deciding whether it is used as the subject or the object of the verb: People (who, whom) are honest themselves usually trust others.

  44. Choose the correct relative pronoun: The speaker (who, whom) he introduced was embarrassed by so much praise.

  45. Choose the correct relative pronoun: The speaker (who, whom) he introduced was embarrassed by so much praise.

  46. Choose the correct relative pronoun: Lucille Clifton is the poet (who, whom) I selected for my report.

  47. Choose the correct relative pronoun: Lucille Clifton is the poet (who, whom) I selected for my report.

  48. When the relative pronoun is the object of a preposition, use the object form whom; for example, to whom, for whom, from whom. Choose the correct relative pronoun: Most of the candidates for (who, whom) I voted were elected.

  49. When the relative pronoun is the object of a preposition, use the object form whom; for example, to whom, for whom, from whom. Choose the correct relative pronoun: Most of the candidates for (who, whom) I voted were elected.

  50. Most of the candidates for whom I voted were elected. We use the object form whom because the relative pronoun is the object of the preposition ___.