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Sizzling Topics for the Summer of 2012:. Annual Leadership Conference for Special Education Administrators. Agenda: Using Effective Practices to Improve Outcomes for Students. Pending Regulations Emergency Safety Interventions Monitoring Kansas Integrated Accountability System Solutions:

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Sizzling topics for the summer of 2012

Sizzling Topics for the Summer of 2012:

Annual Leadership Conference for Special Education Administrators


Agenda using effective practices to improve outcomes for students
Agenda: Using Effective Practices to Improve Outcomes for Students

  • Pending Regulations

    • Emergency Safety Interventions

  • Monitoring

    • Kansas Integrated Accountability System

  • Solutions:

    • Raising the Bar: Kansas Common Core Standards and NAEP

    • Important Collaborations and New Staff

    • Early Childhood

    • MTSS: School Survey of Effective Instructional Practices



Process of development
Process of Development Students

Stakeholder Input

  • 3/14 – Kansas State Board of Education (KSBE) requests recommendation from SEAC

  • 3/16 – Dr. Ann Matthews, chair of SEAC, meets with Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE) staff to lay groundwork for how to proceed

  • 3/19 – Meeting with TASN providers who provide technical assistance in and for behaviors

  • 3/22- Meeting with Kansas Parents Information Regional Center (KPIRC) who work primarily with parents of students who are not identified or receiving special educations services

  • 3/23- Meeting with the Disability Rights Center (DRC) and Families Together

  • 3/23- Meeting with Kansas Association of School Boards (KASB) and United School Administrators (USA) of Kansas

  • 3/26 – Meeting with Project STAY, a contracted provider for technical assistance on behavior

  • 3/27 – Special Education Advisory Council (SEAC) Meeting via conference call to establish a roadmap leading to the SEAC meeting on 4/10

  • 3/27 - Meeting with a parent in Wichita, who provided testimony on the use of Emergency Safety Interventions with his son

  • 3/28– Follow up meeting with Families Together and KPIRC

  • 3/30- Teleconference with members of the Kansas Association of Special Education Administrators (KASEA)

  • 4/ 9 – Follow up meeting with DRC

  • 4/10 – Meeting of SEAC

  • 4/13 – Conference call with Families Together

  • 4/13 – Follow up meeting with DRC and Families Together

  • 4/17- Presentation of SEAC recommendations to KSBE; KSBE tasked KSDE staff to develop proposed regulations for consideration at May meeting of KSBE

  • 4/30 – Meeting with DRC

  • 4/30 – Phone conference with Families Together

  • 5/9 – Presentation of KSDE recommendations for proposed regulations on the use of Emergency Safety Interventions


Process of development1
Process of Development Students

Research

  • National - “Keeping All Students Safe Act” and Office of Civil Rights (OCR) report

    • Included a review of key stakeholder responses to the proposed legislation

    • Insight into what are the national trends on the use of seclusion and restraint in schools

  • State – State policies and practices across the Nation

    • Inclusion of a policy and procedure for data collection and review at the local level

  • Kansas

    • Review of the on-going process for the development of the Guidelines on Seclusion and Restraint from 2005 to the present

    • Reviewed notes and revisions made to draft versions for consideration

    • Studied HB 2444 to consider language and areas of difference from the Guidelines that addressed areas of concern

      Data Review

    • Data on the use of seclusion with students with disabilities collected since 2008

    • Data on the use of seclusion and restraint with all students is being collected, currently, in Kansas for the 2011-2012 school year

    • Data is presented annually to SEAC and the Kansas State Board of Education

    • The collection of data informs the provision of technical assistance to the field and policy recommendations


  • Special education advisory council seac recommendations
    Special Education Advisory Council (SEAC) StudentsRecommendations

    • Regulations are necessary.

    • Any regulations on the use of Emergency Safety Interventions (ESI) should be for all students.


    Four key standards
    Four Key StudentsStandards

    Proposed Regulations provide standards for:

    Communication

    Documentation

    Training

    Appropriateness

    Proposed Regulations speak directly to:

    What districts need to include and what is prohibited in policy;

    What is, and is not, an Emergency Safety Intervention;

    Where responsibilities lie at the local, district, and State level; and

    What each parent can expect in terms of information on Emergency Safety Interventions regardless of what school a child attends


    Additional standard considerations
    Additional StudentsStandard Considerations


    Local dispute resolution standard
    Local Dispute Resolution StudentsStandard

    • 91-42-2. Requirements.

      • (a)(6) Local dispute resolution processes.

      • (a)(6)(A) Each local board of education shall develop policies that, at minimum, shall include:

        • (i) a complaint investigation procedure

        • (ii) a procedure for parents to present written complaints to the local board of education to initiate an investigation

        • (iii) a procedure for parents, the school, and the Kansas state department of education to receive written findings of fact and, if necessary, corrective action from the local board of education within thirty (30) days of the filing of the complaint.


    Reporting standard
    Reporting StudentsStandard

    • 91-42-2. Requirements.

      • (b)(A) Information maintained by the school shall be compiled and submitted, no less than bi-annually, to the district superintendent or district designee.

      • (b)(B) The Kansas state department of education may ask at any time for a school or a districts' documentation of the use of emergency safety interventions.

      • (b)(C) Districts shall report incidents of emergency safety interventions to the Kansas state department of education by the date and in the form established by the Kansas state department of education. The Kansas state department of education shall provide an annual report to the Kansas state board of education.


    Responsibilities of ksde
    Responsibilities of StudentsKSDE

    • Technical Assistance

      • Directing the assistance provided to the field

      • Coordinating with stakeholders to develop materials, trainings, etc.

    • Policy Development

      • Working with KASB and others to help districts develop policies

      • Supporting though Technical Assistance Providers how the policies look in application

    • Data

      • Looking at the Data at a whole

      • Providing guidance to schools and districts on how to use their data

        • Technical Assistance and Training

    • Education

      • Making an investment into providing the resources to parents and districts

        • Families Together

      • Presentations at Conferences, Webinars to the field and to parents

    • Review

      • Annual review of data

      • Presentation to the Board

      • On-going discussion about the regulations and what is translating to the field from stakeholder input

      • Quarterly updates to the Special Education Advisory Council (SEAC)


    Responsibilities of schools and school districts
    Responsibilities of StudentsSchools and School Districts

    • Development of policies consistent with regulations

    • Provide training consistent with regulation

    • Communicate with parents

    • Document any incidents of ESI and review incidents

    • Communicate with District regarding ESI incidents

    • FOLLOW the regulations


    Responsibilities of local school board
    Responsibilities of Local School StudentsBoard

    • Local Board of Education shall establish a local dispute resolution policy and process.

    • Policies must include:

      • Local BOE must establish a complaint investigation procedure.

      • Parent must submit a written complaint to the local BOE to initiate complaint investigation of local BOE

      • Local BOE investigates parent complaint and provides written findings of fact and corrective action, if necessary, to parent, school, and KSDE within 30 days.


    Responsibilities of parents and advocacy organizations
    Responsibilities of Parents and Advocacy StudentsOrganizations

    • Be aware of the regulations and guarantees afforded by the regulations

    • If regulations are not followed, communicate with the school and, if necessary, take action and utilize the local dispute resolution process

    • If no redress after utilizing the local process, then take additional action – district court, contacting authorities, etc.

    • Provide education and training opportunities


    Since the regulations
    Since the Regulations… Students

    • 15 Principles – U.S. Department of Education

    • Key themes:

      • Prevention and Training

      • Only used in situations where the child’s behavior poses an imminent danger (serious physical harm)

      • Policies should apply to all children.

      • A child should be treated with dignity, free from abuse.

      • Restraint or Seclusion should never be used as punishment or discipline or for convenience.

      • Review repeated use – student, teacher, classroom


    In the next few months
    In the Next Few Months Students

    Regulations are working their way through the approval process.

    Districts and schools should be operating under the principles of the Guidelines for the use of Emergency Safety Interventions with any student.

    15 principles provide information and direction for districts looking to move past the Guidelines in anticipation of regulation.

    Parent Guide is available for use by schools and families.



    Osep fiscal monitoring
    OSEP Fiscal Monitoring Students

    Notified on June 15, 2012 that OSEP will conduct monitoring of ALL states during Fall 2012

    Followed up with OSEP State Contact for Kansas and that monitoring will “officially” be conducted in October

    SES team currently reviewing all Fiscal processes in preparation of this Monitoring

    States will be notified be notified in January 2013 of monitoring results


    Kansas fiscal timeline
    Kansas Fiscal TimeLine Students

    Start

    July: Allocations Posted

    Aug: Fiscal File Review Opens

    Sept.: LEA App Part I opens

    October: Award letters sent and allocations opened

    February: Confirmations of LEA App Part II sent

    January: LEA App Part II Opens. Excess Cost will be released during MOE

    End


    Osep monitoring
    OSEP Monitoring Students

    • Kansas: State Maintenance of Financial Support (2009-10 and 2010-11)

    • OSEP is shifting to “results based” monitoring

    • Focus will be on Student Assessment Results

      • State Assessments

        • Participation

        • Performance

        • Gap

        • Relative Difficulty of State Assessments using the NAEP


    Chaos in kias federal and s tate g eneral s upervision u pdates

    Chaos in KIAS: Federal and Students State General Supervision Updates

    Stacie Martin

    [email protected]


    Office of special education programs osep federal
    Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP): Federal Students

    Monitoring of States

    New guidance on State Performance Plan(SPP)Indicator 13: Secondary Transition


    Spp indicator 13 secondary transition
    SPP Indicator 13: Secondary Transition Students

    • Education/Training and Employment goals are to be separated

    • Effective date for incorporating guidance for compliance review will be with the 2012-13 data collection (July 1,2012-June 30, 2013.)

    • Resources:

      • OSEP issued: Questions and Answers on Secondary Transition, updated September 2011

      • Posted on the www.ksde.org website under SES, Integrated Accountability, Indicators and Documents page)


    Spp indicator 13 secondary transition1
    SPP Indicator 13: Secondary Transition Students

    • Education/Training and Employment goals are to be separated

    • Effective date for incorporating guidance for compliance review will be with the 2012-13 data collection (July 1,2012-June 30, 2013.)

    • Resources:

      • OSEP issued: Questions and Answers on Secondary Transition, updated September 2011

      • Posted on the www.ksde.org website under SES, Integrated Accountability, Indicators and Documents page)


    Kansas integrated accountability system kias kansas general supervision system
    Kansas Integrated Accountability System (KIAS) Kansas General Supervision System

    • KIAS Updates

      • Overview

      • http://www.ksde.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=waFwuIcfyn4%3d&tabid=2037&mid=7706

      • Connecting the KIAS components and process

      • Results


    Monitoring file reviews
    Monitoring/File Reviews General Supervision System

    Updated/revised questions for IDEA Requirements, Gifted and Fiscal

    Clarification for Indicator 13: Secondary Transition


    Stakeholder involvement
    Stakeholder Involvement General Supervision System

    • KASEA region representative

      • Provide feedback and input into helping define processes within the KIAS components.


    Solutions raising the bar for effective practices to i mprove instruction summary of kccs and naep

    Solutions: Raising the Bar for Effective Practices to General Supervision SystemImprove Instruction: Summary of KCCS and NAEP

    Debbie Matthews

    [email protected]


    National assessment of educational progress
    National Assessment of Educational Progress General Supervision System

    • Reading and Mathematics

    • Administered in odd numbered years

    • Timed, Paper/Pencil Assessment (no computer)

    • Grades 4 & 8

    • Stratified sample of schools

    • Selected students take either reading or math – not both

    • State level results - no district, building or individual student results


    2011 grade 4
    2011 Grade 4 General Supervision System

    Kansas(top) compared to nation

    Math Reading


    2011 grade 4 students with disabilities
    2011 Grade 4 General Supervision SystemStudents with Disabilities

    Kansas (top) compared to nation

    Math Reading


    Students with disabilities reading participation
    Students with Disabilities General Supervision SystemReading Participation

    % of total exclusions must be = or < 5%

    classified student exclusions cannot exceed 15%


    Students with disabilities math participation
    Students with Disabilities General Supervision SystemMath Participation

    % of total exclusions must be = or < 5%

    classified student exclusions cannot exceed 15%


    Naep accommodations
    NAEP Accommodations General Supervision System

    • Slightly different than state assessments

      • No read aloud on the reading assessment

      • Calculators allowed with calculator block only

    • Similar to the accommodation recommendations for the new SBAC assessment

    • Enforced equally among all states

    • Kansas Students with Disabilities have demonstrated that they can take the NAEP – please give them the opportunity to participate.


    Increased visibility of naep
    Increased Visibility of NAEP General Supervision System

    Governor Brownback (Dec 7, 1011) “According to 2011 NAEP results, 29% of Kansas 4th graders read below the ‘basic’ level and 64% of 4th graders scored below the ‘proficient’ level.  We must do better and by working together and focusing on shared goals, I believe we can.”

    Governor Brownback’s established the following measureable objective: Kansas will be in the top 5 states for average 4th grade reading scores in 2014 (based on 2011 data, this would require an increase of 5 points, from 224 to 229, on Kansas NAEP scores).


    Beth Fultz General Supervision System

    NAEP Consultant

    Career, Standards and Assessment Services

    Kansas State Department of Education

    785-296-2325

    [email protected]


    Ccss by ks assessed standards g r 5
    CCSS by KS Assessed Standards General Supervision SystemGr 5

    Alignment Index: 0.13

    Coarse Grain: 0.20

    KS Assessed Standards Gr. 5

    CCSS Gr. 5

    All Content Areas

    All Content Areas

    Phonemic awareness

    Phonics

    Vocabulary

    Awareness of text and print features

    Fluency

    Comprehension

    Critical Reading

    Author’s Craft

    Writing Processes

    Writing Components

    Writing Applications

    Language Study

    Listening and Viewing

    Speaking and Presenting

    Phonemic awareness

    Phonics

    Vocabulary

    Awareness of text and print features

    Fluency

    Comprehension

    Critical Reading

    Author’s Craft

    Writing Processes

    Writing Components

    Writing Applications

    Language Study

    Listening and Viewing

    Speaking and Presenting

    Evaluate

    Evaluate

    Analyze

    Analyze

    Explain

    Explain

    Generate

    Generate

    Recall

    Recall


    Ks bringing elar instruction into focus
    KS Bringing ELAR Instruction Into Focus General Supervision System

    Spec. Ed. Elem.

    Gr. 5 CCSS

    Gen. Ed. Elem.

    All Content Areas

    All Content Areas

    All Content Areas

    Phonemic awareness

    Phonics

    Vocabulary

    Awareness of text and print features

    Fluency

    Comprehension

    Critical Reading

    Author’s Craft

    Writing Processes

    Writing Components

    Writing Applications

    Language Study

    Listening and Viewing

    Speaking and Presenting

    Phonemic awareness

    Phonics

    Vocabulary

    Awareness of text and print features

    Fluency

    Comprehension

    Critical Reading

    Author’s Craft

    Writing Processes

    Writing Components

    Writing Applications

    Language Study

    Listening and Viewing

    Speaking and Presenting

    Evaluate

    Evaluate

    Evaluate

    Analyze

    Analyze

    Analyze

    Explain

    Explain

    Explain

    Generate

    Generate

    Generate

    Recall

    Recall

    Recall


    Benefits for students
    Benefits for Students General Supervision System

    • Student mobility—comparable education regardless of zip code

    • Increased alignment between K-12 and post-secondary - narrows gap between high school, college, and career readiness


    Benefits to schools
    Benefits to Schools General Supervision System

    • New and better assessments that better measure student learning

    • Student mobility—increased likelihood of comparable assessments between states allows for longitudinal data tracking

    • Easier collaboration among states on curriculum, instruction, and assessment

    • Shifting of resources to focus on improving instructional practices


    English Language Arts General Supervision System

    and

    Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects


    Kansas advantages to common core standards in ela
    Kansas Advantages to Common Core Standards General Supervision Systemin ELA

    • A focus on college and career readiness (CCR)

    • Inclusion of the four strands of English Language Arts:

      • Reading

      • Writing

      • Listening and speaking

      • Language

  • The benefits of an integrated literacy approach – all Kansas educators have a shared responsibility for literacy instruction, regardless of discipline or content area.


  • An integrated model of literacy
    An Integrated Model of Literacy General Supervision System

    • An advantage to Kansas over our now-retired, isolated standards in reading; writing; and speaking, listening, and viewing.

    • The four “strands” of the Kansas Common Core Standards are woven together to show the inter-connected nature of communication processes.

    • Examples:

      • Writing standard #9 requires that students write about what they read

      • Speaking and Listening standard #4 sets the expectation that students will share findings from their research

    Adapted from “Key Design Considerations” (page 4 of the Standards)


    Key advances for english language arts and literacy
    Key Advances General Supervision Systemfor English Language Arts and Literacy

    Reading

    • Balance of literature and informational texts

    • A focus on appropriate levels of text complexity

      Writing

    • Emphasis on argument and informative/explanatory writing

    • Writing about sources and supplying evidence for claims and ideas

      Standards for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects

    • Complement rather than replace content standards in those subjects

    • Shared responsibility of all educators regardless of discipline


    Mathematics General Supervision System


    Mathematical practices
    Mathematical Practices General Supervision System

    • Rewards instructional best practices

    • Clear vision of how students should approach and learn mathematics.

    • Shifts focus to ensuring mathematical understanding over computation skills


    About the critical areas
    About the Critical Areas General Supervision System

    • Broad topics that can be used to organize instruction around for the entire year

    • Closely aligned to NCTM’s Focal Points document


    Resources
    Resources General Supervision System

    KSDE Trainer of Trainers

    Multi Tiered System of Supports (MTSS)

    Language Essentials for Teachers of Reading and Spelling (LETRS)

    Kansas Technical Assistance System Network (TASN)

    Kansas Learning Network (KLN)

    Kansas Guide to Learning Literacy(KGLL)

    Co-Teaching

    Foundation Training for Math


    Some helpful websites
    Some Helpful General Supervision SystemWebsites

    • www.corestandards.org

    • www.ksde.org/kscommoncore

    • www.ksde.org/Default.aspx?tabid=4605


    Timeline
    Timeline General Supervision System

    Formative Processes, Tools, and Practices Development Begins

    Summative Master Work Plan Developed and Work Groups Launched

    Writing and Review of Pilot Items/Tasks (including Cognitive Labs and Small-Scale Trials)

    Writing and Review

    of Field Test Items/Tasks

    (throughout the

    school year)

    Field Testing of Summative and Interim Items/Tasks Conducted

    Final Achievement Standards (Summative) Verified and Adopted

    Procurement Plan Developed

    Content and Item Specifications Development

    Pilot Testing of Summative and Interim Items/Tasks Conducted

    Preliminary Achievement Standards (Summative) Proposed and Other Policy Definitions Adopted

    Operational Summative Assessment Administered

    Common Core State Standards Adopted by All Member States


    Solutions important collaborations and new staff
    Solutions: Important Collaborations and New Staff General Supervision System

    • Diane, Brad, Dale

      • Scott Myers, Tom Foster, Pam Coleman, Sandy Guidry

    • Dean Zajic, Jana Bradfield, Legal EPC, Fiscal

      • SES Team: Small, but mighty!

    • What else has the SES team been doing lately?

      • Accreditation, School Improvement, ESEA waiver, TASNintegration, Early Childhood and MTSS


    Solutions early childhood

    Solutions: Early Childhood General Supervision System

    Gayle Stuber

    [email protected]


    Early learning services unit
    Early Learning Services Unit General Supervision System

    • Early Childhood Success in School and Foundations for School Success— web-based applications for data collection, birth to kindergarten

    • Revision of Kansas Early Learning Standards to align with Kansas common core standards

    • Revised MOA between KDHE and KSDE regarding new Part C regulations which took effect July 1st!


    • MTSS--Ongoing General Supervision Systemimplementation of Four year old at-risk/school-based preschool classrooms

    • School Readiness Framework & Indicators/data elements—Endorsed by KSDE leadership

    • Early Learning Race to The Top Challenge – We learned a lot!


    Solutions mtss

    Solutions: MTSS General Supervision System

    www.kansasmtss.org


    Kansas mtss school survey of effective instructional practices
    Kansas General Supervision SystemMTSS School Survey of Effective Instructional Practices

    1346 Public School Buildings

    656 Valid responses received

    48.7% response rate

    289 Public School Districts

    233 Valid responses received

    80.6% response rate

    329 responses from schools trained by MTSS Recognized Facilitator


    Limitations of survey and data
    Limitations of Survey and Data General Supervision System

    Schools not implementing MTSS less likely to respond to survey

    Data is self reported


    Topical areas surveyed
    Topical Areas Surveyed General Supervision System

    • Introductory Questions

    • Leadership and Empowerment

    • Assessment Practices

    • Curricular and Instructional Practices

    • Data Based Decision Making

    • Tiered Interventions

    • Student Outcomes

    • Professional Development

    • Barriers and Supports to Implementation

    • Integration and Sustainability


    Results
    Results General Supervision System

    • Survey provided a snapshot of MTSS implementation in schools across Kansas

    • 73% of responding schools reported they are currently implementing MTSS

      • Vast majority Reading: 90.4%

      • Math: 63.2%

      • Behavior: 42%


    Professional development
    Professional Development General Supervision System

    An essential feature for ALL staff

    This is true for any support that will benefit students and educators – needs to be ongoing


    Barriers to implementation
    Barriers to implementation General Supervision System

    Time to implement

    Skill level of staff

    Lack of perceived fiscal resources at school level


    Supports to implementation
    Supports to Implementation General Supervision System

    Quality of MTSS training Materials

    Quality of Recognized MTSS Facilitators

    Quality of MTSS Training Sessions

    Structuring Process

    Quality of MTSS Tools

    Building Leadership Support


    Integration and sustainability
    Integration and Sustainability General Supervision System

    Resources are being aligned

    MTSS principles, framework and practices were institutionalized

    MTSS is integrated with other school improvement efforts

    Ongoing professional development is provided

    Leadership and support are available


    Integration and sustainability1
    Integration and Sustainability General Supervision System

    MTSS is being implemented in 88.2% responding schools

    97% of responding schools reported that staff support the ongoing implementation of MTSS


    Moving forward
    Moving forward General Supervision System

    • Less $$

    • More Accountability

    • KSDE is committed to providing resources (TASN)

    • Reminders:

      • Every Student Counts

      • There is a sense of urgency to do whatever we can to improve STUDENT Outcomes


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