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Quick & Simple Simulations That your employees will understand!. Gemba Kaizen Pass-the-ball. Gemba Kaizen Pass-the-ball. Gemba Kaizen Pass-the-ball. Gemba Kaizen Pass-the-ball. Lessons: Try ideas, don’t discuss to death – take action, “trystorming” vs. “brainstorming”

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gemba kaizen pass the ball4

Lessons:

  • Try ideas, don’t discuss to death – take action, “trystorming” vs. “brainstorming”
  • Batch (first run, no order) vs. “Cell” Lines (middle runs of circle, line, etc) vs. Continuous Flow (last run)
  • Moving the part vs. moving the people
  • Handling the part vs. free part movement
  • Proper work instructions – the benefit of good management leadership
  • Communication – working together (initial who has/hasn’t touched the ball)
  • Scrap/rework in departmentalized roles vs. Scrap/rework in flow line (quick response to problems)

Gemba KaizenPass-the-ball

ergonomic o k1

Ergonomic “O.K.”

See how strong a good ergonomic position can be?

ergonomic o k2

Ergonomic “O.K.”

The disability of bad ergonomic positioning

slide11

5s Number Game

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  • My workstation uses numbers from 1 to 30. Starting from 1, see how high you can circle the numbers from 1 to 30 in numerical order in 15 seconds.

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slide12

5s Number Game

  • Now I have SORTED my workstation (removed what is not needed). Now, see how high you can circle the numbers from 1 to 30 in numerical order in 15 seconds.

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slide13

5s Number Game

  • Now I have SIMPLIFIED my workstation (straightened and right side up). Now, see how high you can circle the numbers from 1 to 30 in numerical order in 15 sec.

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slide14

5s Number Game

  • Now my workstation is STANDARDIZED (in sequence and same size). See how easy it is to circle the numbers from 1 to 30 in numerical order in 15 seconds.

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slide15

5s Number Game

  • Now that my workstation is 5S’ed, what numbers are missing? See how easy it is to recognize abnormalities and SUSTAIN when your workstation is 5S’ed.

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toblerone1

What to see?

Toblerone

Toblerone originated in Bern, Switzerland – A city whose name is rumored to mean, “City of bears”.

what did you see

What did you see?

What YOU see vs. what TO see

standardized work
Standardized Work

On your blank piece of paper in front of you draw a pig

standardized work2
Standardized Work

Are all the pigs the same?

Were the work directions clear?

How was the training you were given to draw your pig?

Do you think we could improve the training and directions to get our result to be closer to the same?

Did anyone come around to watch and help you with your drawing

standardized work3
Standardized Work

This time let’s use a paper template

and standard work document

standardized work6
Standardized Work

Does everyone’s pig look similar?

Did the written standard work directions and or pictures help the result?

Were the instructions helpful? Did having a template help?

Any ideas to improve the process?

systems and processes
Systems and Processes

On the following activity sheet, attempt to circle the numbers 1 – 54 in numerical order in the less than 60 seconds.

There will be two rounds.

system complication
System Complication

Feel like you’re firefighting?

system simplification
System Simplification

What if you viewed it as a “Grid” System?

slide39

Systems and Processes

New environments often seem complex

It may be difficult at first, but you can perform effectively by learning and following organized systems & processes

Continuous Improvement plays a vital role in organized and simplified systems & processes.

quick simple simulations

Quick & Simple Simulations

              • Michael D. Thelen
              • SICP C.I. Leader
              • Wells Enterprises, Inc.
              • 1191 18th St SW
              • Le Mars, IA  51031
              • w. 712-548-5667
              • c. 712-540-6318
              • e. mdthelen@bluebunny.com
              • http://www.linkedin.com/in/michaeldthelen
  • http://www.wellsenterprises.com/; http://www.bluebunny.com/; http://www.bombpop.com/
another standardized work option
Another Standardized Work Option
  • Objective: To provide a classroom demonstration of standardized work and how to capture the current state of an operation. To accomplish this, a simulated repeatable operation will be shown, with specific key points for each section. The following points will be covered:
    • The definition of a work cycle
    • The breakdown of a work cycle into job elements
    • How to time work elements
    • The difference between cycle work, periodic work, and fluctuation
    • How to identify kaizen opportunities through time studies
    • The importance of standardized work
  • Equipment:
    • Dry Erase Board
    • Markers (5 or 6)
    • Chair
    • Table or podium
    • Operator
    • Observation Sheets
  • Timing: This exercise should take approximately 30-40 minutes.
  • Background: The operator on this process is tasked with walking up to the products and writing the part number on each box as it comes down the line.
  • To simulate this operation, the operator will write the word ‘Kaizen” on the dry erase board
slide42

Dry Erase Board

Table

Operator

Markers

Chair

Standardized Work

  • Layout:
slide43

Standardized Work

  • Scenario 1
  • Key Teaching Point: The definition of a work cycle
  • Execution: Explain to the audience that you will demonstrate a repeatable operation so that they can see a repeatable job cycle.
  • Starting seated in the chair,
    • Stand up
    • Walk to the table
    • Pick up marker
    • Walk to the board
    • Take off cap
    • Write Kaizen
    • Put cap back on marker
    • Walk to table
    • Put marker down
    • Walk to chair
    • Sit down
  • Repeat the operation 2-3 times to show how it is repeatable.
  • Key Points:
    • The cycle of work starts and ends at the same spot, the chair
    • There are certain elements that are necessary for completing the task of writing kaizen each time
    • Some waste exists in the system, but at this point it is not quantifiable (all “Walk” action)
slide44

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Standardized Work

Scenario 1

slide45

Standardized Work

  • Scenario 2
  • Key Teaching Point: How to time a job cycle
  • Execution: Explain to the audience that now that they understand what a job cycle consists of, we will attempt to time each cycle. Have participants pick a starting point (usually when the operator is sitting in the chair) and start the stopwatch immediately when they start to stand up. Continue timing until the cycle is complete, and the operator is back in the seated position.
  • Starting seated in the chair,
    • Stand up
    • Walk to the table
    • Pick up marker
    • Walk to the board
    • Take off cap
    • Write Kaizen
    • Put cap back on marker
    • Walk to table
    • Put marker down
    • Walk to chair
    • Sit down
  • Repeat the operation 2-3 times to show how it is repeatable. On the first, verbalize when to stop and start the watches. On the second and third runs, allow them to try to start and stop on their own.
  • You may wish to break the participants into teams, and have them record their times on an observation sheet.
  • Key Points:
    • The cycle of work starts and ends at the same spot, the chair
    • There are certain elements that are necessary for completing the task of writing kaizen each time
    • Some waste exists in the system, but at this point it is not quantifiable (all “Walk” action)
    • The time for the cycle will be similar, but not exact. This difference is the fluctuation of the cycle time
slide46

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Standardized Work

Scenario 2

slide47

Standardized Work

  • Scenario 3
  • Key Teaching Point: How to break a job cycle into work elements
  • Execution: Explain to the audience that now that they understand what a cycle consists of and how to time an entire cycle, we will look at breaking a cycle into smaller pieces, called work elements. To identify improvement opportunities, we need to break work down into small pieces. These pieces will highlight the waste and fluctuations, which we can then attack through kaizen.
  • Starting seated in the chair,
    • Stand up
    • Walk to the table
    • Pick up marker
    • Walk to the board
    • Take off cap
    • Write Kaizen
    • Put cap back on marker
    • Walk to table
    • Put marker down
    • Walk to chair
    • Sit down
  • On this run, explain how overall cycle can be broken down into individual job elements. Elements can be best defined as break points in the operation. For this simulation, the above seven steps (not including “Walk” actions) are considered the elements of the operation. In each case the feet, hands, and/or eyes have changed position, indicating a new element. Also, elements are always action activities – stand, sit, pick, place, etc.
  • Have participants try to list the elements. Explain the difference between elements and “walk”. Have participants enter the elements on the observation sheets in both the layout area, as well as spelling out the individual elements in the work element section.
  • Key Points:
    • All work can be broken down into smaller elements, called work elements.
    • These elements are the key to improvement.
    • Elements are action activities separated typically by movement of the feet, hands, and/or eyes.
slide48

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Standardized Work

Scenario 3

slide49

Standardized Work

  • Scenario 4
  • Key Teaching Point: How to time work elements
  • Execution: Now that the audience is comfortable with the individual job elements, now we need to quantify each of the elements using time as the measurement.
  • Starting seated in the chair,
    • Stand up
    • Walk to the table
    • Pick up marker
    • Walk to the board
    • Take off cap
    • Write Kaizen
    • Put cap back on marker
    • Walk to table
    • Put marker down
    • Walk to chair
    • Sit down
  • Demonstrate the job cycle again. On the second run, have audience start timing when you stand up, and using the lap function, have them time each individual element. The first time they are using the watches, call out when to hit the button at the end of each element. Practice 3-5 times after that with them figuring out when to hit the lap button. Have them record their times on an observation sheet.
  • Key Points:
    • Work elements can be timed in order to look for improvement opportunities.
    • Each time the element starts and stops, the lap button is hit to capture the element times.
    • Walk time can also be captured using this technique.
    • Multiple observations will highlight the fluctuation in the process.
slide50

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Standardized Work

Scenario 4

slide51

Standardized Work

  • Scenario 5
  • Key Teaching Point: How to recognize the difference between cycle work, periodic work and fluctuation.
  • Execution: Explain to the audience that what they have focused on thus far is the normal cycle of this work. In the real workplace, other activities take place that impact our ability to complete the operation. As explained in the training, there are three types of work:
  • Cycle work – those elements that happen every time a part or service is performed.
  • Periodic work – functions that occur on an infrequent, but predictable manner. This work is necessary, but impacts the stability and flow of the work. Examples could include moving of boxes, replenishing supplies, etc.
  • Fluctuation – the differences in element times due to unpredictable activities. This would include dropping tools, reaching, etc.
  • Starting seated in the chair,
    • Stand up
    • Walk to the table
    • Pick up marker
    • Walk to the board
    • Take off cap
    • Write Kaizen
    • Put cap back on marker
    • Walk to table
    • Put marker down
    • Walk to chair
    • Sit down
  • To demonstrate cycle work, complete the operation as shown in every scenario thus far.
  • To demonstrate fluctuation, start another job cycle, but between elements 2&3, grab a marker,, return to table and get a different one, and continue through the remainder of the cycle (schedule change). In another cycle, spell “Kaizen” wrong and correct it (defect/rework).
  • Key Points:
    • Cycle work is repeatable on every execution of the job process.
    • Periodic work is necessary, but impacts the stability and flow of the operation, making the output unpredictable and impossible to really pace.
    • Fluctuation is the variation of the work elements due to unpredictable activities. It is waste, and needs to be eliminated in order to improve.
slide52

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Standardized Work

Scenario 5