The Effective Reader (Updated Edition) by D. J. Henry - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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The Effective Reader (Updated Edition) by D. J. Henry

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  1. The Effective Reader(Updated Edition)by D. J. Henry Chapter 10: The Basics of Argument PowerPoint Presentation by Gretchen Starks-Martin St Cloud State University, MN © 2004 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Longman Publishers

  2. Argument • An argument is made up of two types of statements: • Author’s claim: the main point of the argument • The supports: the evidence or reasons that support the author’s claim.

  3. Step 1: Identify the Author’s Claim and Supports. • Gladiatoris a movie worth seeing. • It was nominated for 12 Oscars and won 5. • It is a story about love, courage, and heroism. • It is full of non-stop action. These three statements support the author’s claim.

  4. Step 1: Identify the Author’s Claim and Supports. • Working long hours on the computer should be avoided. (claim) • While working on the computer our eyes don’t blink as often, and they dry out, causing eyestrain. (support) • Extended computer sessions may cause blurred vision and sensitivity to light. (support)

  5. Step 2: Decide Whether the Supports are Relevant. • Online shopping offers a lot of benefits. • You can shop anytime. • You don’t have to leave home. • You can’t try clothes on to see if they fit. • You have to pay postage for returned items. Which items are relevant?


  6. Step 2: Decide Whether the Supports are Relevant. • Online shopping offers a lot of benefits. • R You can shop anytime. • R You don’t have to leave home. • N-R You can’t try clothes on to see if they fit. • N-R You have to pay postage for returned items.

  7. Step 3: Decide Whether the Supports Are Adequate. • Not enough support: • “A vegetarian diet is a more healthful diet. I feel much better since I became a vegetarian.” The support is inadequate. It should include expert opinions and facts, not just personal opinion.

  8. Example of support: • “Muscles burn more calories than fat.” • One pound of muscle burns 50 calories a day. • One pound of fat burns 2 calories a day. • Two pounds of muscle can burn up 10 pounds of fat in one year.

  9. The Logic of Argument • Most textbooks rely on research by experts, and these experts may have differing views on the same topic. • Textbook arguments are usually well developed with supports that are relevant and adequate: studies, surveys, expert opinions, experiments, theories, examples, or reasons. • Textbooks may also offer graphs, charts, and photos as supports.

  10. Practice Complete the following: • Chapter Review • Applications • Review Tests • Mastery Tests • Remember to complete your scorecard for the Review Tests in this chapter.