ESL High School Planning PLC Session 3 2013 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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ESL High School Planning PLC Session 3 2013

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  1. ESL High School Planning PLC • Session 3 • 2013

  2. Good Morning • Sign in at the table by the door. • Enjoy a snack. • Make a name tag. • Put the text: Fish Cheeks in order.

  3. Text Reformation • As a group decide on at least one sentence to move to change the order of the text. • Discuss the implications of the changes at your table. • Share your changes with the group.

  4. After-Reading Strategies: Scales A subjective, low-stress way to examine and discuss a text.

  5. After-Reading Strategies: Scales • Likert Scales -- similar to those seen on surveys Amy was rude at the New Year’s dinner: Strongly disagree disagree agree strongly agree The important thing is discussing why the student agrees/disagrees, not just the rating itself.

  6. After-Reading Strategies: Scales • Semantic Differential Scales – placing a character or event on a continuum between opposite descriptors. Amy was… Proud of her family ---------------------------- Embarrassed by her family. Again, the important thing is discussing why the student chose the position on the continuum.

  7. After-Reading Strategies: Retelling Somebody Wanted But So -- a template for retelling a narrative.

  8. After-Reading Strategies: Retelling Now complete the template for “Fish Cheeks”:

  9. Bloom’s Taxonomy, RevisedFormulating Questions Question Types Which type has more rigor? Passive questions: response mode, answered by student Active questions: questions asked by the student

  10. ELLs NEED MORE RIGOR ! Use Bloom’s Revised to help! Remember Understand Apply Analyze Evaluate Create

  11. Model different kinds of questionsthat stimulate HOTS. Low Level Thinking Skills Think about “Little Red Riding Hood” Low Level Thinking/Questions How many little girls are in the story? What happened first in the story? Did Little Red know where she was going?

  12. Now think “higher”… High Level Thinking Would you rather be the wolf or Little Red? Why? What other stories are similar to Little Red? Explain… What other endings to the story might be possible? Describe…

  13. Strategy: Think-Write-Share • Work with a partner. • Think about Fish Cheeks. • Write a “low level” list of questions on top of page. • Then…change them into HOT questions!

  14. Stragegy:“Give & Take Journal” Questioning & writing communication: Topic: Fish Cheeks Partner 1: Write a HOT question for partner to answer in writing. Partner 2: Answer partner’s question; then formulate a question for them to answer. Continue until complete Share verbally what you wrote and why with partner.

  15. Fractured Fairy Tales • Strategy: Add more rigor in thinking, comprehension, and writing. • Think about Fish Cheeks. • How could you extend the story, change the location, turn it into a fairy tale or another genre of story, change the setting, add more characters, instill humor, give it a twist, use modern day language…..all without changing the main premise of the original????

  16. Work in your small group… • Discuss how you will “fracture the story”. • Brainstorm the possibilities. • You must include the selected vocabulary words from the story . • Chart the story …….and then decide how you will share out with total class. Think HOTS !

  17. Jigsaw: Writing Strategies • Read your assigned strategy. • Explain your strategy to the group creatively. • Scaffold Argument Analysis Chart pages: 149-150 • Take a Stand p. 151 • Sequencing Flow Chart p. 160 • Paragraph Frames and Essay pages: 163-165 • Fact Cards p. 158

  18. How to Teach Students to Provide a Written Response with Organization and Development 1. Sentence Frames with or without word-level support Example: Question: What lesson did Tan learn over time? Answer: Over time, Tan learned _____________________.

  19. How to Teach Students to Provide a Written Response with Organization and Development Why did Tan’s mother serve her daughter’s favorite foods? Tan’s mother served her daughter’s favorite foodsbecause she wanted to please her. What foods did Tan’s mother serve on Christmas Eve? Tan’s mother served rock cod, tofu, fungus, and squid on Christmas Eve. How did Tan feel during dinner that night? Tan felt embarrassed during dinner that night.

  20. How to Teach Students to Provide a Written Response with Organization and Development 2. Paragraph Frames with or without word-level support Example: Question: Based on the text, how does the author describe Bobby in the text? According to the text, the author describes Bobby in __________ ways. First, in paragraph 4, the author says __________________. Next, in paragraph 7, the author used the words ______________ to describe Bobby. Finally, in paragraph 9, the author says _____________. Based on the text, I think Bobby is _list of character traits to refer to .

  21. Color Coded Paragraph Frames Topic Sentence Supporting Details plus transition Elaboration Supporting Details plus transition Elaboration Supporting Details plus transition Conclusion

  22. Color Coded Paragraph Frames Why was the author embarrassed during dinner? The author was embarrassed during dinner several times. The first time she was embarrassed was when her relatives licked the ends of their chopsticks and reached across the table. They put their chopsticks into the plates of food. Secondly, she was embarrassed when her father poked his chopstick into the eye of the fish. She said she wanted to disappear after he said, “Amy, your favorite.” The final straw to her embarrassment, was when her father belched at the table. Even though he explained the custom, she was “stunned into silence”.The author was embarrassed many times during dinner because her culture was different from that of her guest.

  23. 6 Traits Writing Assessment: an Overview

  24. A model for teaching and assessing Developed when researchers asked the question, “What are the traits of good writing?” What is “6 Traits”?

  25. Language proficiency issues generate even more issues in developing good writing LEPs bring many different skill-levels to the process 6 Traits is flexible and standards-based, allowing you to evaluate each student against his or her own progress How Can 6 Traits Help LEPs?

  26. Holistic approach Address each trait separately Rubric Assessment

  27. Ideas Organization Voice Word Choice Sentence Fluency Conventions Introducing: The Traits

  28. The content of the piece. -- p. 35 Ideas

  29. Select an idea Narrow the idea Elaborate on the idea Discover the best information to convey the idea Ideas

  30. Select an idea (the topic) Narrow the idea (focus) Elaborate on the idea (development) Discover the best information to convey the idea (details) Ideas

  31. Ideas Rubric

  32. Organization is the internal structure of the piece, the thread of central meaning, the pattern of logic. -- p. 70 Organization

  33. An inviting introduction gets the reader started and gives clues about what is to come. Thoughtful transitions link key points and ideas. Sequencing should be logical, purposeful, and effective. Pacing – speeding up for wide angle and slowing down for close-ups – should be under control. A satisfying conclusion wraps it all up, yet leaves the reader with something to wonder about. Organization

  34. An inviting introduction gets the reader started and gives clues about what is to come. Thoughtful transitions link key points and ideas. Sequencing should be logical, purposeful, and effective. Pacing – speeding up for wide angle and slowing down for close-ups – should be under control. A satisfying conclusion wraps it all up, yet leaves the reader with something to wonder about. -- p. 71 Organization

  35. Organization Rubric

  36. Voice is the golden thread that runs through a piece of writing. It’s how the reader knows it is really you. -- p. 102 Voice

  37. Where the writer reveals their personality Very difficult to teach Use quality writing for examples Seems to be best achieved through honesty Voice

  38. At minimum, writing should evidence an awareness of: Audience Context Significance of the topic Attempting to connect the audience to the writing Voice

  39. Voice Rubric

  40. … the use of rich, colorful, precise language that communicates not just in a functional way, but also in a way that moves and enlightens the reader. -- p. 142 Word Choice

  41. Precision Clarity Variety “grade-level appropriateness” Word Choice

  42. An area of weakness for our students Strong vocabulary is developed through reading That vocabulary can be wonderfully reinforced through its application in writing Word Choice

  43. Word Choice Rubric

  44. Fluent writing is graceful, varied, rhythmic – almost musical. It’s easy to read aloud. -- p. 178 Sentence Fluency

  45. Is best described by what to avoid: Repetitive sentence structures Short, choppy sentences Incorrect sentence structures Sentence Fluency

  46. LEPs need to work on this trait Overtly teach varied sentence structures On rewrites, challenge students to use the same words in new ways Sentence Fluency

  47. Sentence Fluency Rubric

  48. Almost anything a copy editor deals with comes under the heading of conventions: punctuation, grammar and usage, capitalization, and paragraphing. -- p. 214 Conventions

  49. Spelling Grammar Punctuation Conventions

  50. Conventions Rubric