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COMP Classroom Organization & Management Program. Presented By: Marie Angermiller, Lakeitha Bassett, Milton May, Katy Minton, and Nashika Stokes. Classroom Organization and Management Program Key Points.

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COMP Classroom Organization & Management Program


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    1. COMP Classroom Organization & Management Program Presented By: Marie Angermiller, Lakeitha Bassett, Milton May, Katy Minton, and Nashika Stokes

    2. Classroom Organization and Management Program Key Points Purpose: To help teachers create a positive learning environment through the development of a management framework within which a variety of academic activities take place, and where students learn to take responsibility for their decisions, actions, and learning Goals: To create conditions for learning so teachers can foster student achievement reduce discipline problems. To help teachers improve their overall instructional and behavioral management skills through planning, implementing, and maintaining effective classroom practices. Background and Research: 12 studies in regular and special education setting; grades K-12; spans 15 years; includes 4000 hours of observation in 580 classrooms in 100 schools; since 1989, the program has served 60,000 teachers and administrators in 33 states The Creators: Dr. Carolyn Evertson & Dr. Arlene Harris

    3. Classroom Organization and Management Program Key Points • COMP guides teachers in learning steps toward creating a well-organized classroom and approaches the process as teachers encounter it: • Focusing on planning in 7 KEY AREAS • Presenting strategies for implementing the plan • Establishing positive management policies • Learning methods for maintaining these procedures throughout the year • COMPprovides training modules in 7 KEY AREAS of classroom management. Each include: • a self-assessment checklist • a summary of related research • suggestions of ideas that work • case studies for problem solving • activities to help teachers apply ideas from key areas directly to the classroom • Results/Validation:COMP received validation by the US Department of Education’s National Diffusion Network

    4. Key Area Description“Organizing the Classroom”

    5. Organizing the Classroom • 5 Keys to Good Room Arrangement • Be consistent w/instructional goals. • Keep high traffic areas clear. • Keep all students visible. • Keep materials/supplies handy. • Keep all presentations visible.

    6. Arranging Classroom • Bulletin Boards/Walls • Floor space • Arrangement of student desks • Teacher’s desk, files, equipment • Computer workstations • Work areas, centers, bookcases • Pets, plants, aquariums, special items

    7. Storage Space & Supplies • Textbooks, instructional materials • Frequently used items • Teacher’s supplies • Other equipment • Seasonal & special projects

    8. Floaters Inspect each room for: • Overhead projector • Sufficient number of desks • Your own space on chalkboard, shelf, &/or cabinet

    9. Key Area Description“Planning and Teaching Rules and Procedures”

    10. Planning and Teaching Rules and Procedures • An effective classroom has patterns and routines, which are established through • Rules – Written expectations for behavior in a classroom • Procedures – Patterns for accomplishing classroom tasks • Expectations – Desired behaviors or outcomes • Norms – Familiar ways of interacting in a classroom

    11. Norms and Expectations • Four specific aspects of establishing classrooms norms and expectations: • Stating expectations clearly, • Implementing classroom rules and procedures, • Supporting expectations consistently, and • Reevaluating established norms.

    12. Stating Expectations Clearly The strategy of stating expectations clearly involves the explicit acknowledgement of expectations for students actions and/or interactions in ways that the students can understand and achieve. Tips for Implementation… • Know what you want students to do and at what level of achievement. Make sure it is something they can accomplish. • In understandable increments, state what the task is, why you are asking students to complete it, the steps involved, and how the task will be assessed. Provide written directions if possible. Model the action(s) requested.

    13. Implementing Classroom Rules and Procedures • Classroom rules and procedures are • connected in three ways: • Rules are the expectation boundaries within which procedures are followed. • Procedures form routines that help students meet the expectations stated in the rules. • Both rules and procedures must be taught, practiced, and consistently supported to be effective. In the classroom.

    14. Sample Classroom Rules • Respect yourself, your peers, and their property. • Talk at appropriate times and use appropriate voices. • Be in your seat and ready for class when the bell rings. • Follow my directions. • Obey all school rules. Adapted from Evertson & Harris, 2003;Evertson, Emmer, & Worsham, 2003

    15. Example Rules and Procedures…

    16. Tips for Implementation… • Anticipate what students need to know and do in the classroom, both academically and socially, before the school year begins. Plan for the first days of school based on these learning goals. For example, if students’ prompt attendance is needed to maximize instructional time, then plan for corresponding classroom rules and procedures by responding to such question as. • - What time will class begin? • - How will I be prepared to begin class promptly? • - How will I present my expectations of promptness to students? • - What consequences will result from tardiness?

    17. Supporting Expectations Consistently Teachers must first teach students the classroom rules and procedures, provide students practice with them, and then consistently respond to student actions and interactions in regard to these rules and procedures. Tips for Implementation… • Know and understand both your expectations for students and your responses when students meet or do not meet these expectations. You should have responses for meeting your expectations (positive, or supporting, consequences) and for not meeting your expectations (negative, or deterring, consequences).

    18. Reevaluating Established Norms • Through norms • Clear communication of expectation • Consistent support of these expectation Tips for Implementation… • Regularly reflect on the classroom rules and procedures implemented in the classroom. Consider both the students’ actions and interactions as well as your own. Compare the accepted norms (what has become familiar in your classroom) with what is required for an effective classroom. • State your expectations clearly to students and support these expectations consistently.

    19. Key Area Description“Managing Student Academic Work”

    20. Tips for Managing Student Academic Work and Promoting Student Responsibility • Use rubrics to increase student accountability for work. • Create portfolios or folders of student work. • Have a folder filled with activities for students who finish their seatwork early.

    21. Tips for Managing Student Academic Work and Promoting Student Responsibility • To help students monitor their own progress on long-term projects, create a step-by-step checklist that breaks down the project. • Have an assignment and goal listed on the board each day for students to copy down and take home each night for their parents to sign and check off completed work.

    22. Key Area Description“Managing Good Student Behavior”

    23. Maintaining Good Student Behavior • Helps teachers develop and implement a system to maintain appropriate student behavior • Encouraging praise • Intervention strategies • Teacher’s actions influence students’ development

    24. Maintaining Good Student Behavior Build a sense of community • A “shared morality” emerges in the classroom • Students begin to develop autonomy. • Emphasis on student engagement, self-regulation and community responsibility with teacher guidance.

    25. Key Area Description“Planning For Instruction”

    26. Planning for Instruction • Encourages teachers to consider a variety of formats as they structure learning activities • Management, teaching, and learning are complimentary • Integrate management and instruction • Management is not a precondition of content instruction

    27. Planning for Instruction • Guide students by asking conceptual/ focusing questions • Gradually step back and withdraw • Classrooms must be arranged so that students have access to information resources • The use of time is a key element in any classroom.

    28. Planning for Instruction • Close and constant teacher monitoring of student work • Get students to construct knowledge • Foresee potential problems or barriers • Teachers must be learners themselves

    29. Key Area Description“Maintaining Momentum”

    30. Tips for Facilitating Instruction and Maintaining Momentum • Use rubrics to increase student accountability for work. • Create portfolios or folders of student work. • Have a folder filled with activities for students who finish their seatwork early.

    31. Tips for Facilitating Instruction and Maintaining Momentum • To help students monitor their own progress on long-term projects, create a step-by-step checklist that breaks down the project. • Have an assignment and goal listed on the board each day for students to copy down and take home each night for their parents to sign and check off completed work.  

    32. Key Area Description“Getting Off To A Good Year”

    33. Getting the year off to a good start • 4 Guiding Principles • Resolve student uncertainties. • Plan simple lessons. • Keep whole-class focus. • Be Available, Visible & In Charge.

    34. Plan for: • Book distribution • Required paperwork • Class rosters & seating • Rules & procedures • Course requirements • Time fillers

    35. 1st Day Activities • Before class • Administrative tasks • Get acquainted • Rules, Procedures, Requirements • Introductory lesson

    36. 2nd Day Activities • Identify and seat new students • Restate class routines, • rules & procedures, • requirements • Restate material organization • Do content activity • Close period