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Blocked discourse

Blocked discourse

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Blocked discourse

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  1. Blocked discourse How consent is made

  2. On communicative ethics

  3. On communicative ethics • In this model, ethics are in practices, not in people. • We’d ask, are our interactions more or less reciprocal and is it possible to challenge existing theories and assumptions?

  4. On communicative ethics • In this model, ethics are in practices, not in people. • We’d ask, are our interactions more or less reciprocal and is it possible to challenge existing theories and assumptions? • Ethics are a “positive” force, not merely a “speed limit” on self-interested communication

  5. On communicative ethics • In this model, ethics are in practices, not in people. • We’d ask, are our interactions more or less reciprocal and is it possible to challenge existing theories and assumptions? • Ethics are a “positive” force, not merely a “speed limit” on self-interested communication • Ethical communication can help arrive at solutions and innovations we couldn’t have found alone

  6. Blocked discourse

  7. Blocked discourse • “When discussion is thwarted, a particular view of reality is maintained at the expense of equally plausible ones usually to someone’s advantage.” (Deetz, 235)

  8. Blocked discourse • “When discussion is thwarted, a particular view of reality is maintained at the expense of equally plausible ones usually to someone’s advantage.” (Deetz, 235) • “…systems of domination are protected from careful exploration and political advantage is protected and extended.”

  9. Blocked discourse • “When discussion is thwarted, a particular view of reality is maintained at the expense of equally plausible ones usually to someone’s advantage.” (Deetz, 235) • “…systems of domination are protected from careful exploration and political advantage is protected and extended.”

  10. Blocked discourse • “quiet, repetitive micro practices done for innumerable reasons which function to maintain normalized conflict-free experience and social relations.” (235)

  11. Blocked discourse Deetz provides six ways of “blocking” conversations that ought to happen…

  12. Blocked discourse Deetz provides six ways of “blocking” conversations that ought to happen… • Disqualification • Naturalization • Neutralization • Topical avoidance • Subjectification of Experience • Meaning denial

  13. Disqualification

  14. Disqualification • Keeping important conversations from happening by denying someone’s right to speak, or denying the value of their speech

  15. Disqualification • Keeping important conversations from happening by denying someone’s right to speak, or denying the value of their speech

  16. Naturalization

  17. Naturalization • Keeping important conversations from happening by claiming that the current conditions are “Natural” or “just the way it is” or “the way we do things around here.”

  18. Neutralization

  19. Neutralization • Keeping conversations from happening by claiming that the current condition is “objective” or “value-free” and that only the alternatives are “political” and “biased”

  20. Neutralization • Keeping conversations from happening by claiming that the current condition is “objective” or “value-free” and that only the alternatives are “political” and “biased” • This hides the fact that every system is “political” and “biased”—and it protects the dominant values from scrutiny.

  21. Topical Avoidance

  22. Topical Avoidance • Keeping important conversations from happening by making certain topics “off-limits.”

  23. Subjectification of Experience

  24. Subjectificationof Experience • Keeping conversations from advancing by claiming that some position is “just my opinion” (or “just your opinion”)… and therefore not open to discussion

  25. Subjectificationof Experience • Keeping conversations from advancing by claiming that some position is “just my opinion” (or “just your opinion”)… and therefore not open to discussion • Free and open Communication would require that claims about our feelings and opinions should be the start not the end of the discussion

  26. Meaning Denial

  27. Meaning Denial • Keeping important conversation from happening by denying subtle or underlying meanings • This allows a person to get a message across without having to take responsibility for it

  28. Meaning Denial • Keeping important conversation from happening by denying subtle or underlying meanings • This allows a person to get a message across without having to take responsibility for it • Many forms of discrimination and sexual harassment work this way…

  29. Re-opening Conversation

  30. Re-opening Conversation • Metacommunication: Talk about talk– pointing to discourse blockages and working for greater reciprocity

  31. Re-opening Conversation • Metacommunication: Talk about talk– pointing to discourse blockages and working for greater reciprocity • Rhetoric: Directly challenging dominant meanings and interpretations

  32. Re-opening Conversation • Metacommunication: Talk about talk– pointing to discourse blockages and working for greater reciprocity • Rhetoric: Directly challenging dominant meanings and interpretations • Strategy: Civil disobedience, disrupting systems, forcing crises