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International Cuisine. THM -THS 244 Food Production Techniques.

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International cuisine
International Cuisine

Zeki Polatkesen


Thm ths 244 food production techniques

THM-THS 244 Food Production Techniques

This practical, hands-on course will enable the students in small groups to work in the a la carte kitchen of the practice restaurant. They will have the opportunity to, using the knowledge gained in food preparation techniques, apply standard recipes, prepare a selection of international dishes for service in the restaurant.

Syllabus

The course introduces students to the most common tools and equipment and basic methods used in the preparation of foods. These are the standards used in international kitchens of the hotel and restaurant industry. Students will be introduced to the various products used with common basic preparation methods; use and interpretation of recipes, as well as planning menus considering the traditional organization of medium to large kitchen operations.

THM 232 Food Production

Credits : 4

ECTS Credits : 4

Office Hours & Location : Wednezday 14.40 - 15.40 - RA 120

Name of Lecturer : Instructor Zeki Polatkesen

E-mail address : [email protected]

Homepage:http://www.satm.bilkent.edu.tr/~polatkesen

Ext. : 5041

Office : RC 207

Required Material

Status: Course Book

Type: Textbook

Title: International Cuisine

Author: Zeki Polatkesen

Year: 2010

1stEdition

Publisher:

Zeki Polatkesen Chef-Instructor


Course contents
Course Contents

1. Week

1-5 FebruraryOrientationion Kitchen

During the first day of orientation, students will tour the kitchen & restaurant. Uniforms, policies, procedures manuals, grading policies, and curriculum will be distributed. 11

2. Week

8-12 FebruaryMediterranean Cuisines (Turkish,Spanish,Portuguese, Italian, and French)Students will be introduced to the most common Mediterranean food and various products used with common basic preparation and cooking techniques for commercial consumption. Also students will be praper daily breads and desserts for guests. The student will learn skills in sanitation, safe food handling, safe equipment handling.

3. Week

15-19 FebruaryNorth American Cuisines

(Canadaian American)

Students will be introduced to the most common North American food and various products used with common basic preparation and cooking techniques for commercial consumption. Also students will be praper daily breads and desserts for guests. The student will learn skills in sanitation, safe food handling, safe equipment handling.

4. Week

22-26 FebruaryEast Asian Cuisines

(Chinese, Japanese,Korean, and Taiwan)

Students will be introduced to the most common East Asian Cuisines food and various products used with common basic preparation and cooking techniques for commercial consumption. Also students will be praper daily breads and desserts for guests. The student will learn skills in sanitation, safe food handling, safe equipment handling.

Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


1-5 March Northern European Cuisines

(British, Irish, Scandinavian)

Students will be introduced to the most common Northern Europeancuisines food and various products used with common basic preparation and cooking techniques for commercial consumption. Also students will be praper daily breads and desserts for guests. The student will learn skills in sanitation, safe food handling, safe equipment handling.

5. Week

6. Week

8-12 MarchCentral American Cuisines

(Mexican, Costa Rican,El Salvadorian, and Guatemalan)Students will be introduced to the most common Central American cuisines food and various products used with common basic preparation and cooking techniques for commercial consumption. Also students will be praper daily breads and desserts for guests. The student will learn skills in sanitation, safe food handling, safe equipment handling.

15-19 March Take home;

Write tree courses menu; Starter, Main course, Dessert, and recipes for two peoples.

7. Week

15-19 MarchSouth Asian Cuisines

(Indian, Nepali, Pakistani and Sri Lankan)

Students will be introduced to the most common South Asian cuisines (The art of seasoning and flavoring) food and various products used with common basic preparation and cooking techniques for commercial consumption. Also students will be praper daily breads and desserts for guests. The student will learn skills in sanitation, safe food handling, safe equipment handling.

8. Week

22-26 MarchCaribbean Cuisines

(Cuban, Dominican, Haitian, Puerto Rican, Trinidad and Tobago)

Students will be introduced to the most common Central American cuisines food and various products used with common basic preparation and cooking techniques for commercial consumption. Also students will be praper daily breads and desserts for guests. The student will learn skills in sanitation, safe food handling, safe equipment handling.

9. Week

29-02 AprilMiddle East Cuisines

(Turkish, Parsian, Levantine,and North African)

Students will be introduced to the most common Middle East cuisinesfood and various products used with common basic preparation and cooking techniques for commercial consumption. Also students will be praper daily breads and desserts for guests. The student will learn skills in sanitation, safe food handling, safe equipment handling.


05-09 AprilSpring Semester Break

10. Week

11. Week

12-16 AprilSoutheast Asian Cuisines

(Indonesian, Malaysian, Thailand, and Philippines)

Students will be introduced to the most common Southeast Asian cuisines food and various products used with common basic preparation and cooking techniques for commercial consumption. Also students will be praper daily breads and desserts for guests. The student will learn skills in sanitation, safe food handling, safe equipment handling.

12. Week

19-23 AprilEastern European Cuisines

(Russian, Polish, Hungarian, and Ukrainian)Students will be introduced to the most common Eastern European cuisines food and various products used with common basic preparation and cooking techniques for commercial consumption. Also students will be praper daily breads and desserts for guests. The student will learn skills in sanitation, safe food handling, safe equipment handling.

13. Week

26-30 AprilOpen Buffet

(International Cuisines)

Students will be introduced to the most common Open Buffet (International Cuisines) food and various products used with common basic preparation and cooking techniques for commercial consumption. Also students will be praper daily breads and desserts for guests. The student will learn skills in sanitation, safe food handling, safe equipment handling.

14. Week

Final Exam (Practical)

Write tree courses menu; Starter, Main course, Dessert, and prepare for two people in four hours.

Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


Assessment
ASSESSMENT

ComponentPercentage

Practical kitchen 65 %

Take home10 %

Final 25%

Evaluation

  • Evaluation of practical kitchen (food lab) work is based upon the fallowing (65%)

  • 1. Punctuality, ability to dress professionally (Grooming and Cleanlinnes of uniform)…10 Point

  • 2.Your ability to apply the theory to practise,as well as the ability to work with professional tools,and Interpretation of cooking methods and recipes............................................... 15 Point

  • 3. Quality of prepered food is evaluated as fallows........................................................15 Point

    • Taste

    • Use of herbs and spices

    • Consistency of the prepered food

    • Colour and texture

    • Temperature

    • Yeild

  • 4. Food sanitation, proper procedures fallowed in the preparation of the dishes, and clean up

  • after the session is completed.........................................................................................15 Point

  • 5. Ability to work indepently in an organised fashion. Attitude towards work and follow students............................................................................................................................10 Point

  • Each kitchen session will be evaluateted on the above, this will represent 60 % of the final mark given.

  • Mid term exam..........15 %

  • Final practical exam 25 %

  • Student must achieve 40% standing for passing gradeout of the practical kitchen performance.

Zeki Polatkesen Chef-Instructor


TOTAL:

25 Point

Bonus

Attitude

10

Cleanness

15

Food Prep

15

DAILY STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FORM

Wok Ability

15

Paunctuality

10

Stuudents

Name, Surename

No

3

10

1

5

6

2

4

7

8

9

Zeki Polatkesen Chef-Instructor


Student evaluation grading standard
Student Evaluation & Grading Standard

Student Evaluation:

The student will be evaluated on the degree to which student learning outcomes are achieved. A variety of methods may be used such as , class participation, In-class attendanceGrooming, Cleanness, Behaviors, assignments, etc.

See individual instructor’s course handouts for grading system and criteria (point value for each assessment component in course, e.g. tests, papers, attendance etc.), number of papers and examinations required in the course, and testing policy including make ups and/or retests.

GRADING STANDARD:

A Mastery of essential elements and related concepts, plus demonstrated excellence or originality.

B+ Mastery of essential elements and related concepts, showing higher level understanding.

B Mastery of essential elements and related concepts.

C+ Above average knowledge of essential elements and related concepts.

C Acceptable knowledge of essential elements and related concepts.

D Minimal knowledge of related concepts.

F Unsatisfactory progress. This grade may also be assigned in cases of academic misconduct, such as cheating or plagiarism, and/or excessive absences.

Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


Rules and regulations thm 61 323 and ths 52 222 section 1 to 5
Rules and RegulationsTHM 61 323 and THS 52 222 Section 1 to 5

Course:International Cuisine - Food Preparation

Location: Main Kitchen

Description:

Working as a team, prepare and cook food in a restaurant setting – sititation.

To fallow a recipe, in whole or in part, to produce a full menu as would be found in a large kitchen in the hospitality industry.

Objectives:

To work in co - operation with others, under pressure.

To display and understand professional use of kitchen tools.

To correctly and safely handlle small and large equipment.

Attendance

To : All Food Preparations Students

Attandence is a vital compenent in any educational setting. In culinary education, the participatory nature of instruction makes it absolutely essential. A student’s ability to learn

is jeopardized by lateness and absance.This emphasis on being present when required is equally important in the food service industry.

In order for the Hospitality Division to create and maintain high stanandards, each student is required to fallow the Division Rules and Regulations.

While on program you will comport yourself in the fallowing fashion:

PUNCTUALITY (At 8:40 A.M).All students must be in full uniform, with required student book or recipes, ready to start the kitchen assignment at 8:40 A.M.

Attendance will be taken at the begining of the class and no one will be allowed to partake in the class after commencement of the lesson, at the discretion of the Chef instructor.

If you miss the class without justifiable reason,as determined by the instructor. Fail to present will result in a ZERO MARK.

No cell phone in the kitchen.

Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


  • Each kitchen class missed will result in your having your kitchen mark reduce by 10 grade point a loss of 30 points is impossible to make up and will result in your having to repeat the course.

  • If more infermation is required, please speak to your advisor and/or instructor.

  • Remember you responsible for your attandance and assingments, wich may be handed out at the begining of the semester.

  • Students failing to comply will be refused admittance to the kitchen, and a mark of zero will be assesed.

  • Students who leave before class is ended will be marked “leaving early”. Which means you lose 5 point.

  • Three leaving early marks count early as one absent.

  • Sick Calls and Absence

  • Serious illness is the only the reason for absence from scheduled classes. Sick call messages should be leftfor your class advisor and / or instructor before 8:00 am.

  • At telephone number 290 5229.

  • A doctor’s note must accompany any absence

  • Students are expected to read the manual, text assingments and kitchen recipes for each new menu prior to coming to the session.

Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


Dress Code kitchen mark reduce by Proper attire is a reflection on pride one’s self and profession. In the food service industry, it is also a health concern. Students are required to be in uniform whenewer they are in the kitchen.

  • Student Dress Code

  • All student must wear a hairnet or (baseball cap) while in the kitchen.

  • It is also important to keep your hair contained, not just to keep it out of prepared foods, but also for your own safety - hair is flammable.

  • A full, clean Chef’s uniform will be worn at all times in the kitchen

  • Chef`s jacket.

  • Chef`s pants.

  • Chef`s neck tie and .

  • Apron (to be worn knee lenght).

  • Foodwear; Safe comfortable flat leather shoes with low heels.Clogs or sabots preferable with safety soles. Running shoes, sport shoes, sneakers, sandals or shoes or boots with high heels not be permitted in the kitchen at any time.Students will provide their own proper shoes.

  • Jewellery; No hair ornaments, earrings or facial jewellery to be worn in the kitchen.No rings, Chains, Bracelets, etc. Will not be permitted at all.

  • Hands and Nail; Hand must be washed, Nail be trimmed, clean and free of nail polish while working with food.

  • Long nails are dangerous in a kitchen; they harbor germs and interfere with proper knife skills.

  • Men shaved daily.

  • Hair must be clean, neat and generally well groomed.

  • Change room and locker; Each student will be provided with a locker to be used when attending the lesson. The student must provide a suitable padlock. The lockerwill be accessible at the begining and of the lesson.

Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


Hygiene
Hygiene kitchen mark reduce by

  • Pesonal hygiene

  • Wash your hands before work and, as necessery as during work, including; Proper food handling is essential. The main concerns are cleanliness, preventing cross-contamination, and keeping foods at safe temperatures. With just a little knowledge, you can save yourself a lot of misery.

  • Wash hands thoroughly with hot soapy water, for a minimum of 20 seconds. Remember to lather up to the elbow. Pay special attention to nails and fingertips, one of the easiest and most crucial steps in food safety. Rings and bracelets can harbor germs, so either remove them or wash them carefully. It is important to wash hands in the following situations.

  • Before the start of food preparation

  • Between handling different food items, such as raw meat, poultry, or fish and vegetables (Don't forget to wipe off the faucet!).

    • After using the bathroom.

    • After tending to a sick person, blowing your nose, sneezing, or coughing.

    • After handling garbage.

    • After touching your face or hair.

    • After eating,drinking, or smoking.

    • After touching or handling anything that may be contaminated with bactaria.

    • Keep your hands away from your face,eyes, hair, and arms.

    • Do not smoke or chew gum while on duty.

    • Cover cuts or sores with BLUE bandages.

    • Do not sit on work tables.

    • No cellphone in the kitchen.

Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


General Hygiene For Kitchen kitchen mark reduce by

  • Safe steps in food handling, cooking, and storage are essential to prevent food borne illness. You can't see, smell, or taste harmful bacteria that may cause illness. In every step of food preparation, follow the four guidelines to keep food safe:

    • Clean—Wash hands and surfaces often.

    • Separate—Don't cross-contaminate.

    • Cook—Cook to proper temperatures.

    • Chill—Refrigerate promptly.

  • Kitchen counters

    • Wash well with hot soapy water and then use a disinfectant.

    • Do not let pets walk on work surfaces and don't sit on work surfaces.

    • Whenever you have finished working with one food, clean the counters well before introducing a new food.

  • Tasting food

    • When tasting food while cooking, always use a separate tasting spoon, and get a new one each time - do not double dip and do not eat off the utensil you are using to stir.

  • Do not use your fingers to taste.

    • It is not sanitary and can cause a burn if the food is very hot.

    • Always handle a tasting spoon by the stem, never by the scoop.

  • Preventing cross-contamination

    • Bacteria from raw meats that are spread to other foods, utensils, or surfaces are called

  • "Cross-contamination".

    • Mixing raw meats with ready to eat foods is the primary source of cross-contamination. This important and multi-faceted category includes the following components:

  • Raw meats, poultry, and fish

    • Always separate raw meats away from produce and ready to eat foods.

    • At the store, have the cashier bag raw meats separately.

    • Always store raw meats on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator, so meat juices won't drip on other foods.

Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


  • Cutting Board kitchen mark reduce by

    • It is a good idea to have separate cutting boards, one for meat, fish, poultry, and one for foods that will be served raw.

    • Plastic cutting boards should be sanitized with a bleach solution or by washing in the dishwasher. To make a bleach solution, use 1 tablespoon of bleach to one quart of cool water. Discard solution daily.

    • Sanitize wooden cutting boards by rubbing with distilled grain vinegar, then air-dry or microwave for ten minutes.

    • Cutting boards, especially wooden ones, should be visually checked to assure that food is not getting embedded in cracks or crevices.

    • Throw out cutting boards when they get excessively worn or hard to clean cracks appear.

    • Wash cutting boards with hot soapy water after each use.

  • Kitchen dishcloths, sponges, and aprons

    • Repeatedly using the same cloth or sponge to wipe counters spreads germs. Remember to wash towels in the washing machine daily and put sponges in the dishwasher.

    • Avoid wiping your hands on your apron, as you will pick up bacteria from the last time you wiped your hands.

    • When hand washing dishes, allow them to air-dry - don't use towels to dry them as this will spread germs.

Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


Kitchen dishcloths, sponges, and aprons kitchen mark reduce by

  • Repeatedly using the same cloth or sponge to wipe counters spreads germs. Remember to wash towels in the washing machine daily and put sponges in the dishwasher.

  • Avoid wiping your hands on your apron, as you will pick up bacteria from the last time you wiped your hands.

  • When hand washing dishes, allow them to air-dry - don't use towels to dry them as this will spread germs.

    Utensils and serving pieces for cooked and raw food

  • If you take raw meat, poultry, or fish to the grill, have a new container to put food in after it is cooked.

  • Wash or replace cutlery and utensils that were used while product was raw.

  • If your meat, poultry or seafood was in a marinade, bring marinade to a boil for at least 3 minutes before using as a sauce.

    Uncooked foods

  • Wash lettuce well (even pre-washed) by soaking in bowl of cool fresh drinkable water.

  • Clean berries and other fruits with running water; the friction of the water will brush off bacteria.

  • It is important to wash melons and other large fruits and vegetables that are not going to be cooked. Remember they came from a farm, grew on dirt, and have been handled by numerous people. If you cut an unwashed melon, the knife will push inside bacteria from the surface.

  • To prevent cross-contamination, always wash foods in a bowl, not in a water-filled sink.

  • If you wash raw chicken, meat, or fish, be sure to wash out the sink well to prevent cross-contamination.

  • When using a food thermometer, always wash it between probes.

  • Frequent hand washing is crucial in preventing cross contamination.

    Cooking

  • Cook ground meats to 160 °F; ground poultry to 165 °F.

  • Beef, veal, and lamb steaks, roasts, and chops may be cooked to 145 °F; all cuts of fresh pork, 170 °F.

  • Whole poultry should reach 180 °F in the thigh; breasts, 170 °F.

  • TemperatureBacteria grow rapidly between the temperatures of 40 degrees F and 140 degreesF. This temperature range is known as the "Danger Zone". To properly store, hold, and cook foods, it is imperative to minimize the amount of time foods are at these temperatures. Pathogenic bacteria thrive in the Danger Zone; certain strains can double in number every 20 minutes. These are the bacteria that cause food borne illnesses, but do not affect taste, smell, or appearance of the food.

  • Any foods that have been in this temperature range for two hours or more should be discarded; they might taste all right, but can make you very sick.

  • Don't marinate food at room temperature for longer than 1 hour.

  • Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


    Refrigeration kitchen mark reduce by

    • Your refrigerator is one of the most important items in your kitchen for keeping foods safe.

    • Always refrigerate perishable items immediately to minimize reproduction of pathogenic bacteria. Refrigeration will not, however, completely protect foods from spoilage bacteria. This family of bacteria can multiply at low temperatures, and diminish the quality of foods, contributing to off-flavors and aromas.

    • It is important to maintain the temperature of your refrigerator below 40 degrees F. Ideal refrigerator temperature is between (2-4C) 36 and 38 degrees F.

    • Frequently check the temperature with an appliance thermometer. If your refrigerator exceeds 40 degrees F for over two hours, dispose of all perishable foods.

    • When refrigerating cooked foods, divide food into smaller portions so they will chill faster.

    • It is also important not to overfill your refrigerator, as cold air circulation is necessary to keep foods chilled.

    • The door areas of the refrigerator have frequent temperature fluctuations from opening and closing, so don't store perishable foods on the door. Keep eggs in the carton inside the refrigerator instead of the egg rack, and don't store milk in the door racks.

    • If food spills in your refrigerator, wipe up the spill immediately and sanitize if necessary.

    • Do weekly checks to assure that food is not spoiling, and occasionally wash all surfaces with warm, soapy water. To keep odors from forming, leave opened box of baking soda on a shelf and change every few months.

  • Thawing Frozen Foods

    • There are three safe ways to thaw frozen food: in the refrigerator, in cold water, and in the microwave. Leaving food on a counter or thawing in hot water will cause food to be in the Danger Zone.

  • Refrigerator:

    • The refrigerator allows slow, safe thawing. Make sure thawing meat and poultry juices do not drip onto other food.

    • Refrigerator thawing can take a long time, but it is the safest method. Plan ahead, as large food items, such as a turkey, may take 24 hours for every 5 pounds. For smaller items, such as chicken breasts, put in the refrigerator in the morning for dinner that evening. Foods that are thawed in the refrigerator can be refrozen safely, with some loss in aesthetic quality.

    • Cold water thawing is faster, but can be more complicated. Meat should be wrapped in a leak-proof bag or else it will absorb the water. Keep water cold by changing it every 30 minutes. A bag of chicken breasts that weighs under a pound will defrost in less than an hour, and a large turkey takes 2 to 3 hours for every 5 pounds. Foods thawed in cold water must be cooked before refreezing.

    • If food is thawed with a microwave, it must be cooked immediately following the thawing. During this process, some of the surface areas might start cooking and are in the danger zone. For this reason, we don't recommend microwave defrosting. Foods thawed in the microwave must be cooked before refreezing.

  • Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


    Cooling kitchen mark reduce by Soups, Stocks, and Hot Liquids Quickly

    • When making a large batch of soup or stew, it can often take a long time to cool. Since foods should not be in the Danger Zone for more than 90 minutes, here are some pointers to cool foods down quickly.

    • Liquids are best cooled in metal containers. Plastic insulates heat and cools more slowly.

    • Set container in an ice-water bath that reaches the same level as the liquid in the container.

    • Stir ice-water bath occasionally to accelerate cooling.

    • Storage instructions and "use by" dates

    • Pay attention to storage instructions, such as "Refrigerate after opening" and dates on containers. If items have been stored improperly, it is safest to discard them instead of risking illness.

    • Always refrigerate perishable food within 2 hours (1 hour when the temperature is above 90 F.

    • Check the temperature of your refrigerator and freezer with an appliance thermometer. The refrigerator should be at 5 °C or below and the freezer at 18 °C or below.

    • Cook or freeze fresh poultry, fish, ground meats, and variety meats within 2 days; other beef, veal, lamb, or pork, within 3 days.

    • Perishable food such as meat and poultry should be wrapped securely to maintain quality and to prevent meat juices from getting onto other food.

    • To maintain quality when freezing meat and poultry in its original package, wrap the package again with foil or plastic wrap that is recommended for the freezer.

    • In general, high acid canned food such as tomatoes, grapefruit, and pineapple can be stored on the shelf for 12 to 18 months. Low acid canned food such as meat, poultry, fish, and most vegetables will keep 1 to 3 years -- if the can remains in good condition and has been stored in a cool, clean, and dry place. Discard cans that are dented, leaking, bulging, or rusted.

    Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


    Personal safety
    Personal Safety kitchen mark reduce by

    • Handle your knives properly:

    • Keep knives sharp.

      • Be alert when using a knife; don't get careless or distracted.

      • Never cut towards yourself; always cut away from yourself.

      • Don't hold food in your hand to cut it - keep it on a cutting board.

      • Use the correct knife for the job; i.e. Chef's knife for chopping, bread knife for breads and tomatoes, paring knife for peeling and small work.

      • Never put your guiding hand on the end of the knife blade for extra leverage; some people might do this when cutting cheese.

      • Never leave knives in the sink.

      • Never put knives in the dishwasher.

      • When walking with a knife, hold it with the side loosely pressed against your thigh.

      • Don't store knives loose in drawer.

      • Don't try to catch falling knives.

    • Preventing burns:

      • Always have kitchen towels, hot pads, or oven mitts readily accessible.

      • Never use a damp towel to hold a hot pot or pan.

      • Be cautious with steam; don't look into a hot pot when opening the lid, and let steam subside first.

      • Sauté or fry foods with high water content carefully; step back when submerging pieces into oil as the water content will cause the oil to spit and splatter.

      • When sautéing, put item in slowly, starting with end nearest yourself and slowly lower the item away from you.

      • Keep pan handles turned in and out of the path of people walking by.

      • Don't carry pots with hot oil; let oil return to room temperature before transporting.

    • Electrical appliances:

      • Dry hands before unplugging appliances.

      • Don't pull on cords to unplug.

      • Don't keep appliances next to a water source.

      • Have all frayed cords repaired by an electrician.

      • Don't plug too many items into one outlet.

    • Handling injuries

      • If you get cut, quickly put pressure on the cut and clean and bandage accordingly. Clean knife and cutting board accordingly.

      • Always wear latex or rubber gloves when you have bandages on your hands. Change bandage often.

      • Firs aid equipment; know where it is and how to use.

      • Report all burns or cuts to instructor immediately.

      • Accidents rarely happen to a calm, well order people.

    Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


    How to read a recipe
    How to Read a Recipe kitchen mark reduce by

    • Read The Recipe

      • Yes that would be the first step, wouldn't it? Read it - all of it, carefully. Make sure that you have all the ingredients in the ingredients list. Make sure that there aren't any ingredients required by the text of the recipe that aren't mentioned in the ingredients list (a major faux pas, but it happens to the best of us).

      • Look at how the different ingredients need to be prepared. Do the onions need to be chopped, diced, irradiated with alpha particles, soaked in 12 year old Australian wine for six days and nights, or what? The difference between halved tomatoes and diced tomatoes can make or break a dish. How you prepare your ingredients is half the battle.

      • Next, does the recipe call for tools? How specifically? Generally if a good recipe mentions a tool very specifically there is a reason. If its a really good recipe that reason will be spelled out. By the same token, if the tool is only mentioned vaguely or not directly mentioned at all then you should be safe using whatever you like.

      • Next comes timing. How long will it take to prepare the various ingredients? How long will it take to prepare the whole recipe? This can be important. You don't want to put the biscuits into the oven at the same time as the turkey - one of these items will be finished a long time before the other and both are best served warm.

    • Prepare Your Ingredients

      • All right. You have all the tools and ingredients you need, you have the recipe handy, and you're ready to cook. First things first, you must prepare your ingredients. If you need half an onion diced, a bell pepper in strips, and two potatoes cubed, you don't want to be doing that while trying to cook. It will only distract you and create an unnecessary opportunity for you to make a mistake. Prepare all your ingredients before you begin cooking. It will make you happier in the long run and the happier you are the healthier you are. If the recipe calls for a preheated oven, this is probably the time for that as well (see note).

      • Now that you have all your ingredients prepared, glance at the recipe once more. The term "divided" may be used, which means that the item will be used more than once during preparation, so this is an important reason for CAREFULLY re-reading the recipe. Make sure you haven't forgotten anything. Now you can continue to cook in accordance with your recipe.

    Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


    Look Beyond The Recipe kitchen mark reduce by

    • Yes, recipes are a good and necessary thing. They allow us to accrue knowledge about cooking. However, as aMr. Einstein once put it, "Imagination is more important than knowledge."Even if you know nothing at all about cooking, stop and think about what you are doing. A little bit of creative thought can make a dish made from any recipe an original masterpiece.

      Notes:

    • On pre-heating ovens: If you are cooking in an oven it is nearly always necessary to preheat that oven. The problem here is twofold:

    • Many cooks do not preheat their ovens properly, or don't preheat them at all.

    • Many cooks think they are preheating properly when they are not.

    • When the pre-heat light on an oven turns off all that means is that the air temperature near the probe in the oven has reached the desired temperature. When you open the oven door a large part of that heat energy comes billowing out and, because the oven walls are still relatively cool, the oven takes between five and ten minutes to recover to its original temperature. The solution is to allow your oven to sit (unopened) for fifteen to twenty minutes after the preheating light turns off to allow the oven walls to absorb heat, thus reducing recovery time.

    • Consider how old the recipe is. A recipe from 1928 is likely to be different than a 1998 recipe. You may need a dictionary to determine what the ingredients are and if you can still get them. Note that many old recipes assume that you already know how to prepare them, listing only the ingredients. Some trial and error (as well as substitutions) may be needed.

    Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


    Take home
    Take home kitchen mark reduce by

    Student Name: Date:

    Student Surname: Student Number:

    Menu

    Starter

    Nicoise Salad

    Tuna Fish, Roasted Potatoes, Green Beans, Boiled Quil Eggs and Olive Oil Wine Winegar Dressing

    Main Course

    Veal Scaloppine Served with Marsala Sauce, Sauteed Baby Spinach with Garlic Chips, and Potato Pancakes

    Dessert

    Chocolate Mousse

    Served with Whipped Cream, Strawberries and Mint Leaves

    Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


    1. STARTER kitchen mark reduce by

    Nicoise Salad Tuna Fish, Roasted Potatoes, Green Beans, Boiled Quil Eggsand Olive Oil Wine Winegar Dressing

    Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


    2. MAIN COURSE kitchen mark reduce by Veal Scaloppine Served with Marsala Sauce, Sauteed Baby Spinach with Garlic Chips, and Potato Pancakes

    Ingredients:   Portion Size: 300 gr Portions: 2  Yield: 600 gr 

    Amount

    Unit

    Ingredient

    Preparation

    ------

    -----

    Protein ------------------

    (150-160 gr) each portion ------------

    290

    gr

    Small veal scaloppine

    50 g each

    3

    gr

    Salt

    2

    gr

    White pepper

    5

    gr

    Flour

    dredging

    20

    ml

    Corn oil

    ------

    -----

    Marsala Sauce -------

    (50-60 ml) each portion ------------

    30

    ml

    Marsala wine

    60

    ml

    Strong veal stock

    10

    gr

    Butter

    ------

    -----

    For Garnish -----------

    (5 to 10 gr) each portion ------------

    10

    gr

    Parsley chopped

    Procedure:  

    1. Lightly flatten each piece of veal with a meat mallet. Do not pound hard, or you may tear the meat.

    2. Dry the meat, season it with salt and pepper, and dredge in flour. Shake off excess. (Do not do

    this step until immediately before cooking.) 3. Heat the oil in a large sauté pan until very hot. Add the veal and sauté over high heat just until

    lightly browned on both sides. (If necessary, sauté the meat in several batches.) 4. Remove the meat from the pan and drain the excess oil. 5. Add the Marsala to the pan and deglaze. 6. Add the stock and reduce over high heat by about half. 7. Add the pieces of butter and swirl the pan until they are melted and blended with the sauce. 8. Add the veal to the pan and bring just to the simmer. Turn the meat to coat it with the sauce. 9. Serve immediately, 3 pieces per portion, sprinkled with chopped parsley.

    Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


    Sauteed baby spinach with garlic chips

    Potato Pancakes kitchen mark reduce by

    Sauteed Baby Spinach with Garlic Chips


    3 dessert chocolate mousse served with whipped cream strawberries and mint leaves
    3. Dessert kitchen mark reduce by Chocolate Mousse Served with Whipped Cream, Strawberries and Mint Leaves

    Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


    Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor kitchen mark reduce by


    Final exam practical
    Final kitchen mark reduce by Exam(Practical)

    Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


    Student Name: kitchen mark reduce by …………………….Date:………………………………

    Student Surname:………………… Student Number:…………………

    Menu

    Starter

    Main Course

    Dessert

    Note: I don’t want to Turkish Menu or Recipes

    Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


    • International Cuisine and Food Production II kitchen mark reduce by

    • Final Exam Evaluation Form

    • Student Name, Surname:……………………………………… Student No:……………………

    • Starter:4Points

    • Starter Must be 150 – 160 gr / Dressing :40 to 50 ml / Garnish:10 gr

    • Starter total weight between: 180-200 gr (If it’s a soup 250 ml)

    • Timing-Temperature:

    • Appearance (Color and Texture):

    • Yield:

    • Taste: Total:

    • Main Dish: 10 Points

    • Total weight between: 300 – 350 gr

    • Protein:150-160 gr /Vegetable:50 gr / Carbohydrate:50 gr /Sauce:40-50ml / Garnish:10 gr

    • Temperature:

    • Appearance (Color and Texture):

    • Yield:

    • Taste:Total:

    • Dessert: 4 Points

    • Total weight between: 200 – 250 gr

    • Dessert: 150–160 gr : Sauce:50 ml - Garnish:10 gr

    • Temperature:

    • Appearance (Color and Texture):

    • Yield:

    • Taste:Total:

    • During the working in the lab:3 Points

    • Set up your Mice en Place

    • Organization

    • CleannessTotal:

    • Creativity or Imaginations:4 Points

      • Total:

    Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


    Acknowledgement
    Acknowledgement kitchen mark reduce by

    Sutudent Name and Surname: ______________________________________ .

    Student number: __________________________ .

    Confirm that I have read the rules and regulations for the Food Production

    Techniques, and Food Preparation course pertaining to dress, conduct and

    assesment.

    That I will only bring into the kitchen for each class, the required text book and will

    not use the kitchen office as a storage area for handbags or other materials.

    Mobile phones will be taken away and must be collected at the Chairmen’s office

    after class.

    _________________________________

    Signature

    To be returned before the

    Together with a passport size Photograph.

    Grades will not be released until the above has been received.

    Date: / /

    Zeki Polatkesen - Chef - Instructor


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