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Reliability. Chapter 4S. Learning Objectives. Define reliability Perform simple reliability computations Explain the purpose of redundancy in a system. Reliability. Reliability The ability of a product, part, or system to perform its intended function under a prescribed set of conditions

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Reliability


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    1. Reliability Chapter 4S

    2. Learning Objectives • Define reliability • Perform simple reliability computations • Explain the purpose of redundancy in a system

    3. Reliability • Reliability • The ability of a product, part, or system to perform its intended function under a prescribed set of conditions • Failure • Situation in which a product, part, or system does not perform as intended • Reliabilities are always specified with respect to certain conditions • Normal operating conditions • The set of conditions under which an item’s reliability is specified

    4. Reliability • Reliability is expressed as a probability: • (Single Component Reliability) The probability that a part, or a single component works. • The probability that the product or system will function when activated • The probability that the product or system will function for a given length of time

    5. Reliability – Single Component • We want to assess how likely this single component works. • This is because nothing always work for 100%. • Why? • Three sources of failure • Defect • End of life • Accident

    6. Defect

    7. End of Life

    8. Accident

    9. Reliability – When Activated • Finding the probability under the assumption that the system consists of a number of independent components • Requires the use of probabilities for independent events • Independent event • Events whose occurrence or non-occurrence do not influence one another

    10. Reliability – When Activated (contd.) • Rule 1 • If two or more events are independent and success is defined as the probability that all of the events occur, then the probability of success is equal to the product of the probabilities of the events (#1 works AND #2 works)

    11. Probability • P(A) : probability that event A occurs. • P(A) : probability that event A does not occur. • We have P(A) =1-P(A) • P(B) : probability that event B occurs. • Assume A and B are independent events, then: • We have: P(A and B) = P(A) * P(B) Instructor Slides

    12. Exercise • A machine has two components. In order for the machine to function, both components must work. One component has a probability of working of .95, and the second component has a probability of working of .88. • What’s the probability that the machine works? Component 1 .95 Component 2 .88

    13. Solution

    14. Reliability – When Activated (contd.) • Though individual system components may have high reliabilities, the system’s reliability may be considerably lower because all components that are in series must function • One way to enhance reliability is to utilize redundancy • Redundancy • The use of backup components to increase reliability

    15. Reliability – When Activated (contd.) • Rule 2 • If two events are independent and success is defined as the probability that at least oneof the events will occur, the probability of success is equal to the probability of either one(it works) plus (OR) 1.00 minus that probability (it fails…) multiplied by the other probability (AND the other works)

    16. Exercise • A restaurant located in area that has frequent power outages has a generator to run its refrigeration equipment in case of a power failure. The local power company has a reliability of .97, and the generator has a reliability of .90. • What’s the probability that the restaurant will have power ? Generator .90 Local Power .97

    17. Solution • Two Approaches:

    18. Reliability – When Activated (contd.) • Rule 3 • If two or more events are involved and success is defined as the probability that at least one of them occurs, the probability of success is 1 - P(all fail). 1 – (#1 fails AND #2 fails AND #3 fails)

    19. Exercise • A student takes three calculators (with reliabilities of .85, .80, and .75) to her exam. Only one of them needs to function for her to be able to finish the exam. What is the probability that she will have a functioning calculator to use when taking her exam? Calc. 3 .75 Calc. 2 .80 Calc. 1 .85

    20. Solution

    21. What is this system’s reliability? .85+(1-.85)*(.8+(1-.8)*.75) .75 .80 .70 .95+(1-.95)*.8 1-((1-.75)*(1-.8)*(1-.85)) .9+(1-.9)*.7 .80 .95 .99 .9925 .97 .90 .99*.9925*.97 .9531 .85

    22. Reliability – Over Time • In this case, reliabilities are determined relative to a specified length of time. • This is a common approach to viewing reliability when establishing warranty periods

    23. The Bathtub Curve

    24. Distribution and Length of Phase • To properly identify the distribution and length of each phase requires collecting and analyzing historical data • The mean time between failures (MTBF) in the infant mortality phase can often be modeled using the negative exponential distribution

    25. Exponential Distribution

    26. Exponential Distribution – Formula

    27. Exercise • A light bulb manufacturer has determined that its 150 watt bulbs have an exponentially distributed mean time between failures of 2,000 hours. What is the probability that one of these bulbs will fail before 2,000 hours have passed?

    28. Solution e-2000/2000 = e-1 From Table 4S.1, e-1 = .3679 So, the probability one of these bulbs will fail before 2,000 hours is 1 .3679 = .6321

    29. Normal Distribution • Sometimes, failures due to wear-out can be modeled using the normal distribution

    30. Availability • The fraction of time a piece of equipment is expected to be available for operation

    31. Availability MTBF MTR Repair or Maintenance Running Repair or Maintenance Running Repair or Maintenance Time

    32. Exercise • John Q. Student uses a laptop at school. His laptop operates 30 weeks on average between failures. It takes 1.5 weeks, on average, to put his laptop back into service. What is the laptop’s availability?

    33. Solution

    34. Recap